De-Stigmatization of Mental Illness and Addiction Requires Increased Content in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula Globally

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621979
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
De-Stigmatization of Mental Illness and Addiction Requires Increased Content in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula Globally
Author(s):
Kent-Wilkinson, Arlene E.; Blaney, Leigh; Groening, Marlee; Santa Mina, Elaine E.; Rodrigue, Carmen; Hust, Carmen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Lambda
Author Details:
Arlene E. Kent-Wilkinson, PhD, RN, CPMHN(C), Professional Experience: The following describes Dr. Kent-Wilkinson’s (PI) expertise and years of training specific to this educational activity: • 2008-Current: Set up a study abroad reciprocal nursing student exchange with Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. • 2013-Current: Initiated the International Research Group (IRG), University of Saskatchewan. • 2013-2017, PI: Launched longitudinal survey, of Study abroad: Factors influencing nursing student decisions to apply for study abroad; wrote first draft of survey questions, ethics application and annual renewal; first author on 2013 technical report, 2015 peer reviewed publication, and abstracts for oral and poster presentations at related conferences. • 2016, PI: Study Abroad in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Perceived impact on RN Nursing Practice; conducted literature review; wrote first draft of grant application, survey questions, qualitative interview questions, budget, timeline, and ethics application; hired research assistant; contracted transcription services; participated in thematic analysis, and write-up of findings; and wrote 1st draft of paper for publication. Author Summary: Arlene Kent-Wilkinson RN, CPMHN(C) BSN, MN, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. Prior to becoming a faculty member, Arlene worked in the clinical areas of emergency, addictions, mental health, correctional, and forensic psychiatric nursing. Dr. Kent-Wilkinson is an Executive member, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Sciences and Justice Studies (CFBSJS) Research Centre, University of Saskatchewan. Arlene is a member of the Xi-Lambda Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, Winnipeg, MB.
Abstract:
Problem: In 2017, stigma towards persons with mental health conditions and addiction still occurs around the world, unconfined by demographics or national boundaries. Societal stigma towards persons with mental health conditions and addiction remains an overwhelming barrier to safe, comprehensive mental health assessment and care. Issue of project: Canadian undergraduate nursing curricula contains limited mental health and addiction content in some nursing education programs. Furthermore, nurse educators may perpetuate societal stigma if their programs do not expose students enough to persons and families experiencing mental health conditions and addictions. Brief description/ Background: Mental health conditions and addictions persist as serious health concerns that affect the lives of 20% of Canadians. Attempts by patients to access mental health and addiction services continue to be met with widespread stigma in hospitals, workplaces, and schools, and in both rural and urban communities. Tragically, persons who seek help for mental health conditions report that they often experience some of the most deeply felt stigma from front-line health care personnel. For this reason, health care providers remain one of the target groups of anti-stigma initiatives. Negative beliefs and attitudes exist among health care providers (including nurses) towards persons with mental health challenges and mental illnesses. Nursing students, like all members of society, are not immune to societal perceptions and discrimination towards people with mental health and addiction challenges. Solutions/De-stigmatization through evidence-informed education: Reducing stigma in society requires education, and a change in behaviour and attitudes so that people living with mental illnesses can be assured of acceptance, respect, and equitable treatment. The most effective response to increase knowledge and decrease stigma is to ensure evidence-informed education of future nurses through a significant increase of psychiatric mental health and addictions theory and practice in undergraduate nursing curricula. Relevance: The author(s) will overview the national stigma campaigns and the role and responsibility of nursing and nursing education in the de-stigmatization of mental illness and addiction. The quality and quantity of mental health and addiction education in undergraduate nursing curricula is critical to de-stigmatization, and to the visibility and advancement of the overall mental health of people globally. Application to other settings: Because nursing professionals constitute a strong and influential stakeholder group that can change both mental health care and social attitudes, pre-practice mental health educational programs would benefit nurses, and communities in which they practice.
Keywords:
de-stigmatization; mental health and addiction; nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST327
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleDe-Stigmatization of Mental Illness and Addiction Requires Increased Content in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula Globallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKent-Wilkinson, Arlene E.en
dc.contributor.authorBlaney, Leighen
dc.contributor.authorGroening, Marleeen
dc.contributor.authorSanta Mina, Elaine E.en
dc.contributor.authorRodrigue, Carmenen
dc.contributor.authorHust, Carmenen
dc.contributor.departmentXi Lambdaen
dc.author.detailsArlene E. Kent-Wilkinson, PhD, RN, CPMHN(C), Professional Experience: The following describes Dr. Kent-Wilkinson’s (PI) expertise and years of training specific to this educational activity: • 2008-Current: Set up a study abroad reciprocal nursing student exchange with Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. • 2013-Current: Initiated the International Research Group (IRG), University of Saskatchewan. • 2013-2017, PI: Launched longitudinal survey, of Study abroad: Factors influencing nursing student decisions to apply for study abroad; wrote first draft of survey questions, ethics application and annual renewal; first author on 2013 technical report, 2015 peer reviewed publication, and abstracts for oral and poster presentations at related conferences. • 2016, PI: Study Abroad in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Perceived impact on RN Nursing Practice; conducted literature review; wrote first draft of grant application, survey questions, qualitative interview questions, budget, timeline, and ethics application; hired research assistant; contracted transcription services; participated in thematic analysis, and write-up of findings; and wrote 1st draft of paper for publication. Author Summary: Arlene Kent-Wilkinson RN, CPMHN(C) BSN, MN, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. Prior to becoming a faculty member, Arlene worked in the clinical areas of emergency, addictions, mental health, correctional, and forensic psychiatric nursing. Dr. Kent-Wilkinson is an Executive member, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Sciences and Justice Studies (CFBSJS) Research Centre, University of Saskatchewan. Arlene is a member of the Xi-Lambda Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, Winnipeg, MB.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621979-
dc.description.abstract<div class="sectionbox"> <div class="section paperreviewdisplay paperdefaultdisplay reviewdisplay defaultdisplay"> <div class="columnwrapper"> <div class="displayinfo leftcolumn"> <div class="section"> <div class="item"><strong>Problem: </strong>In 2017, stigma towards persons with mental health conditions and addiction still occurs around the world, unconfined by demographics or national boundaries. Societal stigma towards persons with mental health conditions and addiction remains an overwhelming barrier to safe, comprehensive mental health assessment and care. <strong>Issue of project: </strong>Canadian undergraduate nursing curricula contains limited mental health and addiction content in some nursing education programs. Furthermore, nurse educators may perpetuate societal stigma if their programs do not expose students enough to persons and families experiencing mental health conditions and addictions. <strong>Brief description/ Background: </strong>Mental health conditions and addictions persist as serious health concerns that affect the lives of 20% of Canadians. Attempts by patients to access mental health and addiction services continue to be met with widespread stigma in hospitals, workplaces, and schools, and in both rural and urban communities. Tragically, persons who seek help for mental health conditions report that they often experience some of the most deeply felt stigma from front-line health care personnel. For this reason, health care providers remain one of the target groups of anti-stigma initiatives. Negative beliefs and attitudes exist among health care providers (including nurses) towards persons with mental health challenges and mental illnesses. Nursing students, like all members of society, are not immune to societal perceptions and discrimination towards people with mental health and addiction challenges. <strong>S</strong><strong>olutions/</strong><strong>De-stigmatization through evidence-informed education:</strong><strong> </strong>Reducing<strong> </strong>stigma in society requires education, and a change in behaviour and attitudes so that people living with mental illnesses can be assured of acceptance, respect, and equitable treatment. The most effective response to increase knowledge and decrease<strong> </strong>stigma is to ensure evidence-informed education of future nurses through a significant increase of psychiatric mental health and addictions theory and practice in undergraduate nursing curricula. <strong>Relevance: </strong>The author(s) will overview the national stigma campaigns and the role and responsibility of nursing and nursing education in the de-stigmatization of mental illness and addiction. The quality and quantity of mental health and addiction education in undergraduate nursing curricula is critical to de-stigmatization, and to the visibility and advancement of the overall mental health of people globally. <strong>Application to other settings: </strong>Because nursing professionals constitute a strong and influential stakeholder group that can change both mental health care and social attitudes, pre-practice mental health educational programs would benefit nurses, and communities in which they practice.</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>en
dc.subjectde-stigmatizationen
dc.subjectmental health and addictionen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T15:10:09Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T15:10:09Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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