Need for Mental Health and Addiction Curriculum in Undergraduate Nursing Education in Canada and Globally

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621980
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Need for Mental Health and Addiction Curriculum in Undergraduate Nursing Education in Canada and Globally
Author(s):
Kent-Wilkinson, Arlene E.; Blaney, Leigh; Groening, Marlee; Santa Mina, Elaine E.; Rodrigue, Carmen; Hust, Carmen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Lambda
Author Details:
Arlene E. Kent-Wilkinson, PhD, RN, CPMHN(C), Professional Experience: The following describes Dr. Kent-Wilkinson’s (PI) expertise and years of training specific to this educational activity: • 2008-Current: Set up a study abroad reciprocal nursing student exchange with Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. • 2013-Current: Initiated the International Research Group (IRG), University of Saskatchewan. • 2013-2017, PI: Launched longitudinal survey, of Study abroad: Factors influencing nursing student decisions to apply for study abroad; wrote first draft of survey questions, ethics application and annual renewal; first author on 2013 technical report, 2015 peer reviewed publication, and abstracts for oral and poster presentations at related conferences. • 2016, PI: Study Abroad in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Perceived impact on RN Nursing Practice; conducted literature review; wrote first draft of grant application, survey questions, qualitative interview questions, budget, timeline, and ethics application; hired research assistant; contracted transcription services; participated in thematic analysis, and write-up of findings; and wrote 1st draft of paper for publication. Author Summary: Arlene Kent-Wilkinson RN, CPMHN(C) BSN, MN, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. Prior to becoming a faculty member, Arlene worked in the clinical areas of emergency, addictions, mental health, correctional, and forensic psychiatric nursing. Dr. Kent-Wilkinson is an Executive member, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Sciences and Justice Studies (CFBSJS) Research Centre, University of Saskatchewan. Arlene is a member of the Xi-Lambda Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, Winnipeg, MB.
Abstract:

Purpose: Mental health and addiction conditions persist in 2017 as serious health concerns that affect the lives of one in every five Canadians and their families. Nurses, as the largest group of health care providers are significant stakeholders in meeting the mental health and addiction care needs of citizens globally. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of inclusion of mental health and addiction content in the curricula of all undergraduate nursing programs, addressing the need for entry-to-practice competencies; and, discussing the responsibility of nursing education and professional associations.

Need/Issue: The complexity of concurrent disorders supports the need for entry-level undergraduate nursing education in Canada to prepare all new RNs to identify, care for, and manage mental health and addiction disorders. Results of an environmental scan in 2015 revealed that 22 percent of Canada’s 46 undergraduate nursing programs lacked a designated mental health theory course in their curriculum, and 28 percent of the nursing programs did not offer a clinical placement in mental health. How will new graduate nurses be able to advocate for persons with mental health conditions and addictions if they have not had theoretical and clinical nursing exposure in their undergraduate nursing program? Education (both theoretical knowledge and psychomotor/psychosocial clinical skills) in mental health and addiction for all undergraduate nursing students is essential. Although it is common for undergraduate nursing students to feel apprehensive about transitioning into the graduate nursing role in any area of nursing, entry-to-practice core competencies in mental health and addictions are needed in undergraduate nursing programs. When approximately 50 percent of people with a mental health disorder also have an addiction problem, and at least 20 percent of people with an addiction problem also have a mental health disorder, education is needed. The undergraduate education of all registered nurses (RNs) must provide student nurses with the ability to also recognize co-existing physical and mental health conditions and the interconnections between them. Future graduates entering nursing, the largest component of the health care workforce, need education in mental health and addiction to provide many workplace settings with health promotion education, access to preventive health services, and links to primary, secondary, and tertiary health care.

Responsibility of Nursing Education and Professional Associations: In 2015, the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN) partnered with members of the Canadian Federation of Mental Health Nurses (CFMHN) to develop the Entry-to-Practice Mental Health and Addiction Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum.  Members of the CFMHN Education Committee focused their CFMHN (2016) 3rd position statement and paper on this crucial need in nursing education: Mental health and Addiction Curriculum in Undergraduate Nursing Education in Canada. The scope and complexity of mental health conditions and addiction issues provides a clear justification for including mental health and addiction competencies within all nursing undergraduate programs in Canada and globally. In this presentation, the author(s) will argue that it is reprehensible for schools of nursing to graduate nursing students who have limited knowledge of caring for at least 20 percent of the population in Canada, and similar rates globally, who live with mental health and addiction conditions.

Keywords:
competencies; mental health and addiction; nursing education curriculum
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST526
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleNeed for Mental Health and Addiction Curriculum in Undergraduate Nursing Education in Canada and Globallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKent-Wilkinson, Arlene E.en
dc.contributor.authorBlaney, Leighen
dc.contributor.authorGroening, Marleeen
dc.contributor.authorSanta Mina, Elaine E.en
dc.contributor.authorRodrigue, Carmenen
dc.contributor.authorHust, Carmenen
dc.contributor.departmentXi Lambdaen
dc.author.detailsArlene E. Kent-Wilkinson, PhD, RN, CPMHN(C), Professional Experience: The following describes Dr. Kent-Wilkinson’s (PI) expertise and years of training specific to this educational activity: • 2008-Current: Set up a study abroad reciprocal nursing student exchange with Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. • 2013-Current: Initiated the International Research Group (IRG), University of Saskatchewan. • 2013-2017, PI: Launched longitudinal survey, of Study abroad: Factors influencing nursing student decisions to apply for study abroad; wrote first draft of survey questions, ethics application and annual renewal; first author on 2013 technical report, 2015 peer reviewed publication, and abstracts for oral and poster presentations at related conferences. • 2016, PI: Study Abroad in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Perceived impact on RN Nursing Practice; conducted literature review; wrote first draft of grant application, survey questions, qualitative interview questions, budget, timeline, and ethics application; hired research assistant; contracted transcription services; participated in thematic analysis, and write-up of findings; and wrote 1st draft of paper for publication. Author Summary: Arlene Kent-Wilkinson RN, CPMHN(C) BSN, MN, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. Prior to becoming a faculty member, Arlene worked in the clinical areas of emergency, addictions, mental health, correctional, and forensic psychiatric nursing. Dr. Kent-Wilkinson is an Executive member, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Sciences and Justice Studies (CFBSJS) Research Centre, University of Saskatchewan. Arlene is a member of the Xi-Lambda Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, Winnipeg, MB.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621980-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Mental health and addiction conditions persist in 2017 as serious health concerns that affect the lives of one in every five Canadians and their families. Nurses, as the largest group of health care providers are significant stakeholders in meeting the mental health and addiction care needs of citizens globally. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of inclusion of mental health and addiction content in the curricula of all undergraduate nursing programs, addressing the need for entry-to-practice competencies; and, discussing the responsibility of nursing education and professional associations.</span></p> <p><strong>Need/Issue:</strong> The complexity of concurrent disorders supports the need for entry-level undergraduate nursing education in Canada to prepare all new RNs to identify, care for, and manage mental health and addiction disorders. Results of an environmental scan in 2015 revealed that 22 percent of Canada’s 46 undergraduate nursing programs lacked a designated mental health theory course in their curriculum, and 28 percent of the nursing programs did not offer a clinical placement in mental health. How will new graduate nurses be able to advocate for persons with mental health conditions and addictions if they have not had theoretical and clinical nursing exposure in their undergraduate nursing program? Education (both theoretical knowledge and psychomotor/psychosocial clinical skills) in mental health and addiction for all undergraduate nursing students is essential. Although it is common for undergraduate nursing students to feel apprehensive about transitioning into the graduate nursing role in any area of nursing, entry-to-practice core competencies in mental health and addictions are needed in undergraduate nursing programs. When approximately 50 percent of people with a mental health disorder also have an addiction problem, and at least 20 percent of people with an addiction problem also have a mental health disorder, education is needed. The undergraduate education of all registered nurses (RNs) must provide student nurses with the ability to also recognize co-existing physical and mental health conditions and the interconnections between them. Future graduates entering nursing, the largest component of the health care workforce, need education in mental health and addiction to provide many workplace settings with health promotion education, access to preventive health services, and links to primary, secondary, and tertiary health care.</p> <p><strong>Responsibility of Nursing Education and Professional Associations: </strong>In 2015, the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN) partnered with members of the Canadian Federation of Mental Health Nurses (CFMHN) to develop the <em>Entry-to-Practice Mental Health and Addiction Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum. </em> Members of the CFMHN Education Committee focused their CFMHN (2016) 3<sup>rd</sup> position statement and paper on this crucial need in nursing education: <em>Mental health and Addiction Curriculum in Undergraduate Nursing Education in Canada.</em> The scope and complexity of mental health conditions and addiction issues provides a clear justification for including mental health and addiction competencies within all nursing undergraduate programs in Canada and globally. In this presentation, the author(s) will argue that it is reprehensible for schools of nursing to graduate nursing students who have limited knowledge of caring for at least 20 percent of the population in Canada, and similar rates globally, who live with mental health and addiction conditions.<strong><br /></strong></p>en
dc.subjectcompetenciesen
dc.subjectmental health and addictionen
dc.subjectnursing education curriculumen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T15:16:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T15:16:20Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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