2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621983
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Changing Attitudes With a Gerontological Nursing Course
Other Titles:
Gerontological Nursing Care
Author(s):
Tenhunen, Monica L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Nu
Author Details:
Monica L. Tenhunen, DNP, GNP-BC, ANP-C, Professional Experience: 19 years as a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner in Long Term Care and Home Visits. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty for 13 years. Past President of Iota Eta Chapter. Currently Counselor for Iota Nu at-Large Chapter Author Summary: Dr. Monica Tenhunen is Assistant Professor in the Nursing Department at Texas A&M University-Commerce and has been teaching nursing students for over 13 years. She is a certified Gerontological and Adult Nurse Practitioner. Her practice has been in the care of older adults in nursing homes and in their own homes.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The purpose of the study was to determine baccalaureate nursing student attitudes toward older adults and if a gerontological nursing course changes their attitudes. In 2013, older adults comprised 14.1% of the population and by 2040 are expected to be 21.7% of the population (Agency on Aging, n.d.). The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) requires nursing programs to provide relevant knowledge about aging and states education needs to address incorporation of attitudes in providing care (AACN, 2010).

Multiple studies indicate nursing students do not desire to work with older adults and that their attitudes about this population influence this desire (Henderson, Kelton, Paterson, Siegloff, & Xiao, 2008; Matarese, Dhurata, & Federic, 2010; Matarese, Lommi, Pedone, Alvaro & De Marinis, 2013; Shen & Xiao, 2012). A systematic review competed in 2013 by Liu, et al., indicated inconsistent attitudes among nursing students regarding older adults and that there were not any consistent predictors of attitude.

Education can increase knowledge on a topic. Mattos, et al. (2015), completed a study that showed the knowledge level of students increased with a course on gerontological nursing but there was no change in attitudes. Another study showed an increase in knowledge along with more positive beliefs about older adults (Baumbusch, Dahlke, & Phinney, 2012). There is limited research in the United States on nursing student attitudes regarding older adults.

As the older adult population increases, nursing education needs to focus on preparing graduates to not only understand the special needs of the population, but also to value positions in care of older adults. This study increases evidence regarding how education can influence attitudes in undergraduate nursing students and could promote the advancement of health for older adults.

Methods:

The study includes approximately 55 nursing students in two different cohorts enrolled in an undergraduate baccalaureate-nursing program who consented to participate in the study. The nursing program added a one-semester unit gerontological nursing course to the curriculum, which was not included in the first cohort of students’ curriculum. University Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Instruments included are a demographic survey, Palmore’s Facts on Aging Quiz (FAQ) and Kogan’s Old People Scale (OPS). Permission was obtained to use both of these scales. The FAQ and OPS were shown to be reliable and valid in previous studies (Mangen & Peterson, 1982; Matarese, et al., 2013; Palmore, 1980; Yen, et al., 2008).

The instruments are completed at four different times during the program for students that have the gerontological nursing course as part of their program. The instruments were completed at the end of the program only for the cohort that did not have the course. Data entry was completed by a trained research assistant and verified by a statistician.

Results:

Data analysis using SPSS to determine ANOVA with repeated measures and t-tests to analyze changes in attitudes will be completed for the cohort graduating in December 2016. The 2016 cohort will be compared to the 2015 cohort at the end of their program for further analysis regarding the benefit of the course on influencing attitudes. Results will be compared with other studies to determine consistency of findings.

Conclusion:

Limitations of the study include a small sample size, the study was completed in only one university nursing program, and other factors may have influenced the attitudes of the nursing students. Plans are to continue the study with additional cohorts of students and involve another university nursing program for comparison. The results of this study add to the evidence regarding how education influences attitudes. Educators can use the results to plan and implement teaching to advance future nursing practice.

Keywords:
gerontological nursing; nursing student attitude; undergraduate nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17N06
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleChanging Attitudes With a Gerontological Nursing Courseen_US
dc.title.alternativeGerontological Nursing Careen
dc.contributor.authorTenhunen, Monica L.en
dc.contributor.departmentIota Nuen
dc.author.detailsMonica L. Tenhunen, DNP, GNP-BC, ANP-C, Professional Experience: 19 years as a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner in Long Term Care and Home Visits. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty for 13 years. Past President of Iota Eta Chapter. Currently Counselor for Iota Nu at-Large Chapter Author Summary: Dr. Monica Tenhunen is Assistant Professor in the Nursing Department at Texas A&M University-Commerce and has been teaching nursing students for over 13 years. She is a certified Gerontological and Adult Nurse Practitioner. Her practice has been in the care of older adults in nursing homes and in their own homes.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621983-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of the study was to determine baccalaureate nursing student attitudes toward older adults and if a gerontological nursing course changes their attitudes. In 2013, older adults comprised 14.1% of the population and by 2040 are expected to be 21.7% of the population (Agency on Aging, n.d.). The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) requires nursing programs to provide relevant knowledge about aging and states education needs to address incorporation of attitudes in providing care (AACN, 2010).</p> <p>Multiple studies indicate nursing students do not desire to work with older adults and that their attitudes about this population influence this desire (Henderson, Kelton, Paterson, Siegloff, & Xiao, 2008; Matarese, Dhurata, & Federic, 2010; Matarese, Lommi, Pedone, Alvaro & De Marinis, 2013; Shen & Xiao, 2012). A systematic review competed in 2013 by Liu, et al., indicated inconsistent attitudes among nursing students regarding older adults and that there were not any consistent predictors of attitude.</p> <p>Education can increase knowledge on a topic. Mattos, et al. (2015), completed a study that showed the knowledge level of students increased with a course on gerontological nursing but there was no change in attitudes. Another study showed an increase in knowledge along with more positive beliefs about older adults (Baumbusch, Dahlke, & Phinney, 2012). There is limited research in the United States on nursing student attitudes regarding older adults.</p> <p>As the older adult population increases, nursing education needs to focus on preparing graduates to not only understand the special needs of the population, but also to value positions in care of older adults. This study increases evidence regarding how education can influence attitudes in undergraduate nursing students and could promote the advancement of health for older adults.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>The study includes approximately 55 nursing students in two different cohorts enrolled in an undergraduate baccalaureate-nursing program who consented to participate in the study. The nursing program added a one-semester unit gerontological nursing course to the curriculum, which was not included in the first cohort of students’ curriculum. University Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Instruments included are a demographic survey, Palmore’s Facts on Aging Quiz (FAQ) and Kogan’s Old People Scale (OPS). Permission was obtained to use both of these scales. The FAQ and OPS were shown to be reliable and valid in previous studies (Mangen & Peterson, 1982; Matarese, et al., 2013; Palmore, 1980; Yen, et al., 2008).</p> <p>The instruments are completed at four different times during the program for students that have the gerontological nursing course as part of their program. The instruments were completed at the end of the program only for the cohort that did not have the course. Data entry was completed by a trained research assistant and verified by a statistician.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Data analysis using SPSS to determine ANOVA with repeated measures and t-tests to analyze changes in attitudes will be completed for the cohort graduating in December 2016. The 2016 cohort will be compared to the 2015 cohort at the end of their program for further analysis regarding the benefit of the course on influencing attitudes. Results will be compared with other studies to determine consistency of findings.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Limitations of the study include a small sample size, the study was completed in only one university nursing program, and other factors may have influenced the attitudes of the nursing students. Plans are to continue the study with additional cohorts of students and involve another university nursing program for comparison. The results of this study add to the evidence regarding how education influences attitudes. Educators can use the results to plan and implement teaching to advance future nursing practice.</p>en
dc.subjectgerontological nursingen
dc.subjectnursing student attitudeen
dc.subjectundergraduate nursing educationen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T15:32:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T15:32:26Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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