Educating Healthcare Providers to Identify and Heal Victims of Sex Trafficking

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621984
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Educating Healthcare Providers to Identify and Heal Victims of Sex Trafficking
Author(s):
Ackerman-Barger, Kupiri; Murray-Garcia, Jann L.; Goldstein, Ellen E.; Nutor, Jerry John
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Eta-at-Large
Author Details:
Kupiri Ackerman-Barger, PhD, MSN, RN, TNAC, Professional Experience: 2013-Present University of California, Davis Assistant Clinical Professor 2007-2012 Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA Assistant Professor 2006-2007 Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA Lecturer Nursing 2001-2010 College of the Redwoods, Eureka, CA Lecturer 2014-2015 Promoting Inclusion, Cognitive Diversity & Health Equity through Faculty Development: Workshop style in four blocks across a 10-month period of time, UCDAVIS 2014-Present Grant: Enhancing Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care (Co-researcher) HRSA Funding $646,279 Improving Cultural Competence in NPPA Education Ackerman-Barger, K., Bakerjian, D., Latimore, D. (2016). How Health Professions Educators can Mitigate Underrepresented Students’ Experience of Marginalization: Stereotype Threat, Internalized Bias, & Microaggressions, Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity. Ackerman-Barger, K. & Hummel, F. (2015).Critical Race Theory as a Lens for Exploring Inclusion and Equity in Nursing Education, Journal of Theory Construction & Testing Ackerman-Barger, P. (2010) Embracing multiculturalism in nursing learning environments, Journal of Nursing Education, 46 (12) p. 677-682 Author Summary: Dr. Ackerman-Barger teaches teaching methodology in health sciences, social determinants of health, collaborative practice and organizational change. She also provides faculty development on nursing pedagogy, inter-professional education and education equity. She conducts research and serves as a national consultant and speaker on strategies to optimize student success for underserved and underrepresented groups in health professions..
Abstract:

Purpose:

Human trafficking is recognized as a gross violation of human rights that victimizes tens of millions of vulnerable women, men and children worldwide (Ahn et al., 2013). A United States Congressional Research Service report estimated the number of victims who are trafficked at any one time worldwide may reach as high as 27 million (Siskin & Wyler, 2013)Millions of trafficked victims are unaccounted for and remain invisible to law enforcement, medical providers and other professionals. A lack of awareness of this invisible population has meant missed opportunities to improve both the health of individuals, including minors, and population health. Sex trafficking, a specific type of human trafficking, is a priority health issue because of the physical and mental health risks and outcomes faced by the victims. Sex trafficking occurs when “…a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or when the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of age (U.S Department of State, 2014, p. 29).  Research suggests that sex trafficking victims, in many instances, have had contact with a health care provider. However, most health care professionals have difficulty recognizing and have limited education and training to appropriately respond to victims of sex trafficking.

Aims: This study aimed to 1) assess and increase knowledge, ability and confidence of healthcare providers to identify and heal victims of sex trafficking; 2) assess and build institutional capacity to appropriately and constructively serve victims of sex trafficking.

Methods:

IRB approval was obtained prior to the workshop. A four-hour workshop was provided that featured the lived experience from a sex trafficking survivor; statistics and referrals from local nonprofit community organizations; trauma-informed primary care; and law enforcement actively working on mitigating and ameliorating the impact that sex trafficking has had on the lives of individuals. The structure of the workshop was intended to provide specific information to healthcare providers, but intentionally recruited community members, advocates and healthcare consumers to brainstorm and develop a collective effort to create structures, practices and resources to help and heal victims of sex trafficking. Paper pre- and post-event surveys with a 4-point Likert scale were administered to participants who identified as health professionals or health professional students to assess their perceived levels of knowledge, ability, and confidence during clinical encounters with patients who are victims of sex trafficking. Pre- and post- surveys with open-ended questions were administered to both health care professionals and non-health care professional participants to assess perceptions of institutional capacity. A brainstorming session was conducted to gather data regarding perceptions of potential solutions to better serve the needs of sex trafficking victims and survivors.

Results:

Of the 67 participants who completed the questionnaire, 52 were healthcare providers and 15 were staff, administrators or community members. Pre-event distributions indicated that 47.8% (22) healthcare providers had heard that sex trafficking may be a problem, but did not know more than that. Results from the study indicated that the workshop increased knowledge, ability and confidence and promoted a desire to advocate on behalf of sex trafficking victims. The results of a thematic analysis of qualitative participant responses resulted in five prominent themes that included: training, community and institutional capacity, awareness and advocacy, knowledge of local resources, and coordination of care.

Conclusion:

Although equipping individual healthcare providers with knowledge, awareness and confidence is critical, workshops like this will yield little without institutional support, resource availability, and community partnerships. The findings from this study add to the existing literature by demonstrating that building institutional capacity and collective efficacy are critical to provide and sustain optimal care for sex trafficking victims and to make critical change in the harm created by sex-trafficking.

Keywords:
Prevention; Sex-Trafficking; Trauma
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST348
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEducating Healthcare Providers to Identify and Heal Victims of Sex Traffickingen_US
dc.contributor.authorAckerman-Barger, Kupirien
dc.contributor.authorMurray-Garcia, Jann L.en
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Ellen E.en
dc.contributor.authorNutor, Jerry Johnen
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Eta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsKupiri Ackerman-Barger, PhD, MSN, RN, TNAC, Professional Experience: 2013-Present University of California, Davis Assistant Clinical Professor 2007-2012 Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA Assistant Professor 2006-2007 Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA Lecturer Nursing 2001-2010 College of the Redwoods, Eureka, CA Lecturer 2014-2015 Promoting Inclusion, Cognitive Diversity & Health Equity through Faculty Development: Workshop style in four blocks across a 10-month period of time, UCDAVIS 2014-Present Grant: Enhancing Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care (Co-researcher) HRSA Funding $646,279 Improving Cultural Competence in NPPA Education Ackerman-Barger, K., Bakerjian, D., Latimore, D. (2016). How Health Professions Educators can Mitigate Underrepresented Students’ Experience of Marginalization: Stereotype Threat, Internalized Bias, & Microaggressions, Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity. Ackerman-Barger, K. & Hummel, F. (2015).Critical Race Theory as a Lens for Exploring Inclusion and Equity in Nursing Education, Journal of Theory Construction & Testing Ackerman-Barger, P. (2010) Embracing multiculturalism in nursing learning environments, Journal of Nursing Education, 46 (12) p. 677-682 Author Summary: Dr. Ackerman-Barger teaches teaching methodology in health sciences, social determinants of health, collaborative practice and organizational change. She also provides faculty development on nursing pedagogy, inter-professional education and education equity. She conducts research and serves as a national consultant and speaker on strategies to optimize student success for underserved and underrepresented groups in health professions..en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621984-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Human trafficking is recognized as a gross violation of human rights that victimizes tens of millions of vulnerable women, men and children worldwide (<a title="Ahn, 2013 #10" href="file:///C:/Users/kackermanbarger1/Documents/Documents/Grants,%20Conferences,%20Awards/STTI/Ireland%202017/Sex-Trafficking%20STTI,%20Ireland%202017.docx#_ENREF_1">Ahn et al., 2013</a>). A United States Congressional Research Service report estimated the number of victims who are trafficked at any one time worldwide may reach as high as 27 million (<a title="Siskin, 2013 #35" href="file:///C:/Users/kackermanbarger1/Documents/Documents/Grants,%20Conferences,%20Awards/STTI/Ireland%202017/Sex-Trafficking%20STTI,%20Ireland%202017.docx#_ENREF_13">Siskin & Wyler, 2013</a>)<strong>. </strong>Millions of trafficked victims are unaccounted for and remain invisible to law enforcement, medical providers and other professionals.<strong> </strong>A lack of awareness of this invisible population has meant missed opportunities to improve both the health of individuals, including minors, and population health. Sex trafficking, a specific type of human trafficking, is a priority health issue because of the physical and mental health risks and outcomes faced by the victims. Sex trafficking occurs when “…a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or when the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of age (U.S Department of State, 2014, p. 29).<strong> </strong> Research suggests that sex trafficking victims, in many instances, have had contact with a health care provider. However, most health care professionals have difficulty recognizing and have limited education and training to appropriately respond to victims of sex trafficking.</p> <p><strong>Aims:</strong> This study aimed to 1) assess and increase knowledge, ability and confidence of healthcare providers to identify and heal victims of sex trafficking; 2) assess and build institutional capacity to appropriately and constructively serve victims of sex trafficking.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>IRB approval was obtained prior to the workshop. A four-hour workshop was provided that featured the lived experience from a sex trafficking survivor; statistics and referrals from local nonprofit community organizations; trauma-informed primary care; and law enforcement actively working on mitigating and ameliorating the impact that sex trafficking has had on the lives of individuals. The structure of the workshop was intended to provide specific information to healthcare providers, but intentionally recruited community members, advocates and healthcare consumers to brainstorm and develop a collective effort to create structures, practices and resources to help and heal victims of sex trafficking. Paper pre- and post-event surveys with a 4-point Likert scale were administered to participants who identified as health professionals or health professional students to assess their perceived levels of knowledge, ability, and confidence during clinical encounters with patients who are victims of sex trafficking. Pre- and post- surveys with open-ended questions were administered to both health care professionals and non-health care professional participants to assess perceptions of institutional capacity. A brainstorming session was conducted to gather data regarding perceptions of potential solutions to better serve the needs of sex trafficking victims and survivors.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Of the 67 participants who completed the questionnaire, 52 were healthcare providers and 15 were staff, administrators or community members. Pre-event distributions indicated that 47.8% (22) healthcare providers had heard that sex trafficking may be a problem, but did not know more than that. Results from the study indicated that the workshop increased knowledge, ability and confidence and promoted a desire to advocate on behalf of sex trafficking victims. The results of a thematic analysis of qualitative participant responses resulted in five prominent themes that included: training, community and institutional capacity, awareness and advocacy, knowledge of local resources, and coordination of care.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Although equipping individual healthcare providers with knowledge, awareness and confidence is critical, workshops like this will yield little without institutional support, resource availability, and community partnerships. The findings from this study add to the existing literature by demonstrating that building institutional capacity and collective efficacy are critical to provide and sustain optimal care for sex trafficking victims and to make critical change in the harm created by sex-trafficking.</p>en
dc.subjectPreventionen
dc.subjectSex-Traffickingen
dc.subjectTraumaen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T15:54:11Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T15:54:11Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.