Gaps in Palliative Care Provision in Saskatchewan, Canada: Learning From Palliative Care Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621986
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Gaps in Palliative Care Provision in Saskatchewan, Canada: Learning From Palliative Care Management
Author(s):
Fowler-Kerry, Susan Eva; Racine, Louise
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Mu Sigma
Author Details:
Susan Eva Fowler-Kerry, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Full Professor with Tenure, College of Nursing 30 years. Taught in both undergraduate and graduate programs. Research focus, pediatric pain, palliative care and Global Health. Received funding from local, national and International founding counsels. Invited consultant for WHO, PAHO, European Union, Middle East Cancer Consortium and George Soros Foundation. Director of the Royal Bank of Canada, Nurses for Kids Program. Editor of 2 texts, numerous refereed publications and reports. Forty Invited Keynotes nationally and internationally. Developed two International Interdisciplinary practicums in Philippines and Uganda focus maternal-Child care. Currently sits on three boards, Saskatchewan Palliative Care, International Children’s Palliative Care Network (ICPCN) and the University of Saskatchewan Faculty Association. Author Summary: Dr. Susan Fowler-Kerry, RN, PhD is a Tenured Full-Professor. Her program of research focuses on Global issues in Child Health,a specialty in Pediatric Pain and Palliative care. Her international experiences are directed at developing and evaluating pediatric palliative community based programs. She has published over 78 reviewed articles, and edited 2 books. Thru her international collaborations she has learned the art and craft of creativity, original thinking, and most importantly thinking, “Outside the box”.
Abstract:

Purpose:  This study is part of an ongoing project to develop a working knowledge about the long-standing uneven development and delivery of palliative care in Saskatchewan, Canada; subsequently providing a foundation for continuing study and facilitating practical improvement of palliative care programs.

Methods: The results to be presented are based on the current stage of this project, the analysis of longitudinal survey data which were collected from the management personnel of palliative care in each health region in 1998, 1999 and 2002. The three surveys are composed of both close-ended and open-ended questions, therefore both quantitative and qualitative analysis are conducted

Results:

 The results in this study have shown that 1) the disproportion of palliative care services among health regions and between rural and urban areas have been persistent from 1998 to 2002; 2) there has been no significant improvement in terms of the undersupplied and/or understaffed services in vast majority of the health regions throughout the survey period, for example, pain/symptom management, physician and nurse support, and designated funding are the top three on the list; 3) there have been several prominent concerns regarding the palliative care system, such as, lack of palliative care training programs or clear guidance for nurses and physicians, ineffective communication between facilities as well as communities due to geographic distance, and a lack of functional collaborations within palliative care team or advisory committee. Nevertheless, the analysis is also able to identify some primary strategies adopted by the palliative care management to improve palliative care in their regions, for instance, organizing activities to enhance community involvement and public awareness, establishing an information center to collect resources from all health regions, and developing systematic networks for palliative care support with other health regions especially the resourceful metropolitan health regions.

Despite the rich information obtained from the current study, some major knowledge gaps can be identified: for example, surveys were only designed to target the palliative care management personnel thus perspectives from palliative care providers, patients and their family caregivers have been largely ignored; the differences between rural/remote and urban areas especially in terms of palliative care accessibility and portability are not directly addressed; information related to culturally-diverse health practices in palliative care has been missing in all current

Conclusion:

The current study provides the knowledge base and inspiration for a new study, which is not only comparable with the current longitudinal data but also able to generate critical new information which has been neglected in the current data. Upon completing this project, both the current and new study would provide practical knowledge to inform health professionals regarding the current situation and prominent issues regarding palliative care in Saskatchewan, and to allow health policy makers to develop feasible educational and service programs to enhance accessibility, portability, and cultural-safety in palliative care delivery to meet the professional and public demands.

Keywords:
Health Care Policy; Longitudinal Data; Palliative Care
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST88
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleGaps in Palliative Care Provision in Saskatchewan, Canada: Learning From Palliative Care Managementen_US
dc.contributor.authorFowler-Kerry, Susan Evaen
dc.contributor.authorRacine, Louiseen
dc.contributor.departmentMu Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsSusan Eva Fowler-Kerry, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Full Professor with Tenure, College of Nursing 30 years. Taught in both undergraduate and graduate programs. Research focus, pediatric pain, palliative care and Global Health. Received funding from local, national and International founding counsels. Invited consultant for WHO, PAHO, European Union, Middle East Cancer Consortium and George Soros Foundation. Director of the Royal Bank of Canada, Nurses for Kids Program. Editor of 2 texts, numerous refereed publications and reports. Forty Invited Keynotes nationally and internationally. Developed two International Interdisciplinary practicums in Philippines and Uganda focus maternal-Child care. Currently sits on three boards, Saskatchewan Palliative Care, International Children’s Palliative Care Network (ICPCN) and the University of Saskatchewan Faculty Association. Author Summary: Dr. Susan Fowler-Kerry, RN, PhD is a Tenured Full-Professor. Her program of research focuses on Global issues in Child Health,a specialty in Pediatric Pain and Palliative care. Her international experiences are directed at developing and evaluating pediatric palliative community based programs. She has published over 78 reviewed articles, and edited 2 books. Thru her international collaborations she has learned the art and craft of creativity, original thinking, and most importantly thinking, “Outside the box”.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621986-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> </span><span lang="EN-CA">This study is part of an ongoing project to develop a working knowledge about the long-standing uneven development and delivery of palliative care in Saskatchewan, Canada; subsequently providing a foundation for continuing study and facilitating practical improvement of palliative care programs.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>The results to be presented are based on the current stage of this project, the analysis of longitudinal survey data which were collected from the management personnel of palliative care in each health region in 1998, 1999 and 2002. The three surveys are composed of both close-ended and open-ended questions, therefore both quantitative and qualitative analysis are conducted</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p> The results in this study have shown that 1) the disproportion of palliative care services among health regions and between rural and urban areas have been persistent from 1998 to 2002; 2) there has been no significant improvement in terms of the undersupplied and/or understaffed services in vast majority of the health regions throughout the survey period, for example, pain/symptom management, physician and nurse support, and designated funding are the top three on the list; 3) there have been several prominent concerns regarding the palliative care system, such as, lack of palliative care training programs or clear guidance for nurses and physicians, ineffective communication between facilities as well as communities due to geographic distance, and a lack of functional collaborations within palliative care team or advisory committee. Nevertheless, the analysis is also able to identify some primary strategies adopted by the palliative care management to improve palliative care in their regions, for instance, organizing activities to enhance community involvement and public awareness, establishing an information center to collect resources from all health regions, and developing systematic networks for palliative care support with other health regions especially the resourceful metropolitan health regions.</p> <p>Despite the rich information obtained from the current study, some major knowledge gaps can be identified: for example, surveys were only designed to target the palliative care management personnel thus perspectives from palliative care providers, patients and their family caregivers have been largely ignored; the differences between rural/remote and urban areas especially in terms of palliative care accessibility and portability are not directly addressed; information related to culturally-diverse health practices in palliative care has been missing in all current</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The current study provides the knowledge base and inspiration for a new study, which is not only comparable with the current longitudinal data but also able to generate critical new information which has been neglected in the current data. Upon completing this project, both the current and new study would provide practical knowledge to inform health professionals regarding the current situation and prominent issues regarding palliative care in Saskatchewan, and to allow health policy makers to develop feasible educational and service programs to enhance accessibility, portability, and cultural-safety in palliative care delivery to meet the professional and public demands.</p>en
dc.subjectHealth Care Policyen
dc.subjectLongitudinal Dataen
dc.subjectPalliative Careen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T16:07:29Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T16:07:29Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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