Identifying Acute Cardiac Deterioration in a Critical Care Setting and Establishing a New Recognition Protocol

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622001
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Identifying Acute Cardiac Deterioration in a Critical Care Setting and Establishing a New Recognition Protocol
Author(s):
Power, Sarah A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Sigma
Author Details:
Sarah A. Power, BS, Professional Experience: Graduate Assistant, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois | 09/07/2016-Present Work in the skills lab to assist students in practicing nursing skills and abilities. Patient Care Technician | Northshore Hospital Systems 08/08/2016-Present Assist patients with activities of daily living and support nursing staff. Albert Schweitzer Fellow, Health & Medicine Research and Policy Group, Chicago, Illinois | 04/01/2016- Present Work to address health disparity in the Chicago community through creating health based programs to promote wellness. Mercy Outpatient Pharmacy Technician, Mercy Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa | 2013-2015 Assisted in dispensing duties, answered patient questions, and restocked inpatient Accudose machines. Scientific Researcher, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa | 2014-2015 Conducted trials on anti-malaria medication (Coartem) to evaluate its effectiveness under Dr. John Gitua. Iowa Department of Public Health Intern, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines, Iowa | 2014-2015 Prepared non-profit hospitals for the changes being implemented through The Affordable Care Act. Author Summary: Sarah Power is a current MS in nursing student at DePaul University. Sarah's background education is a bachelors in science degree from Drake University in Biology and Public Health. At Drake, she worked with Dr. Gitua to research the effects of Coartem on malaria prevention. After completing her nursing degree, she hopes to pursue a career within the intensive care unit (ICU).
Abstract:

Background: The early detection of clinical signs indicating cardiac deterioration can reduce the risk of adverse outcomes (Jones et al., 2013). Worsening physiological symptoms can easily go overlooked or unmanaged, if professionals are not educated properly. When these symptoms are not addressed, patients can experience treatment delays and mortality (Preece et al., 2012). The early detection of cardiac deterioration’s clinical signs can reduce the risk worsening condition, or death. Defining a unit protocol for nurses would allow a systematic way to evaluate patients and their health status.

Objectives: The purpose of an integrative literature review was to identify signs and symptoms that precede acute cardiac deterioration within a critical care setting, and to establish a new recognition protocol to ameliorate patient care outcomes. Cardiac deterioration is a major public health problem with over 350,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests happening each year in the United States (American Heart Association, 2016). Nurses need to be better educated on the signs and symptoms that antecede a cardiac arrest, and have a protocol to identify and to initiate intervention.

Method: An integrative literature review was conducted undergoing an extensive integrative search to identify acute cardiac deterioration within a critical care setting and recognizing protocol measures. Whittemore and Knafl’s (2005) approach to amalgamate review writing was used as a framework to synthesize and organize the literature found.

Results: Vital signs, level of consciousness, lab values, EKG, and age were found to be the most supported symptoms, which lead to acute cardiac deterioration within a critical care setting (Soar & Subbe, 2012; Hodgetts, et al, 2006; Preece et al., 2012). It is unknown if the the current protocols for nurses to recognize these signs are effective in treating patients. Recommendations for a new protocol include the development of an early warning score system.

Conclusions: This review found five clinical symptoms related to cardiac deterioration; however, these symptoms in current nursing protocol programs are not well addressed. Thus, there is a need to develop an appropriate prevention program incorporating these symptoms to help decrease the risk for cardiac deterioration with the intensive care unit.

Keywords:
Cardiac Deterioration; Cardiac Arrest; Nursing Protocol
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST39
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleIdentifying Acute Cardiac Deterioration in a Critical Care Setting and Establishing a New Recognition Protocolen_US
dc.contributor.authorPower, Sarah A.en
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsSarah A. Power, BS, Professional Experience: Graduate Assistant, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois | 09/07/2016-Present Work in the skills lab to assist students in practicing nursing skills and abilities. Patient Care Technician | Northshore Hospital Systems 08/08/2016-Present Assist patients with activities of daily living and support nursing staff. Albert Schweitzer Fellow, Health & Medicine Research and Policy Group, Chicago, Illinois | 04/01/2016- Present Work to address health disparity in the Chicago community through creating health based programs to promote wellness. Mercy Outpatient Pharmacy Technician, Mercy Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa | 2013-2015 Assisted in dispensing duties, answered patient questions, and restocked inpatient Accudose machines. Scientific Researcher, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa | 2014-2015 Conducted trials on anti-malaria medication (Coartem) to evaluate its effectiveness under Dr. John Gitua. Iowa Department of Public Health Intern, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines, Iowa | 2014-2015 Prepared non-profit hospitals for the changes being implemented through The Affordable Care Act. Author Summary: Sarah Power is a current MS in nursing student at DePaul University. Sarah's background education is a bachelors in science degree from Drake University in Biology and Public Health. At Drake, she worked with Dr. Gitua to research the effects of Coartem on malaria prevention. After completing her nursing degree, she hopes to pursue a career within the intensive care unit (ICU).en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622001-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong><span>The early detection of clinical signs indicating cardiac deterioration can reduce the risk of adverse outcomes (Jones et al., 2013). Worsening physiological symptoms can easily go overlooked or unmanaged, if professionals are not educated properly. When these symptoms are not addressed, patients can experience treatment delays and mortality (Preece et al., 2012). The early detection of cardiac deterioration’s clinical signs can reduce the risk worsening condition, or death. Defining a unit protocol for nurses would allow a systematic way to evaluate patients and their health status.</span></p> <p><strong>Objectives: </strong>The purpose of an integrative literature review was to identify signs and symptoms that precede acute cardiac deterioration within a critical care setting, and to establish a new recognition protocol to ameliorate patient care outcomes. Cardiac deterioration is a major public health problem with over 350,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests happening each year in the United States (American Heart Association, 2016). Nurses need to be better educated on the signs and symptoms that antecede a cardiac arrest, and have a protocol to identify and to initiate intervention.</p> <p><strong>Method: </strong>An integrative literature review was conducted undergoing an extensive integrative search to identify acute cardiac deterioration within a critical care setting and recognizing protocol measures. Whittemore and Knafl’s (2005) approach to amalgamate review writing was used as a framework to synthesize and organize the literature found.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Vital signs, level of consciousness, lab values, EKG, and age were found to be the most supported symptoms, which lead to acute cardiac deterioration within a critical care setting (Soar & Subbe, 2012; Hodgetts, et al, 2006; Preece et al., 2012). It is unknown if the the current protocols for nurses to recognize these signs are effective in treating patients. Recommendations for a new protocol include the development of an early warning score system.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions:</strong> This review found five clinical symptoms related to cardiac deterioration; however, these symptoms in current nursing protocol programs are not well addressed. Thus, there is a need to develop an appropriate prevention program incorporating these symptoms to help decrease the risk for cardiac deterioration with the intensive care unit.</p>en
dc.subjectCardiac Deteriorationen
dc.subjectCardiac Arresten
dc.subjectNursing Protocolen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T20:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T20:06:42Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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