Effects of Mindfulness on Outcomes in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants: A Pilot Study

12.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622008
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Effects of Mindfulness on Outcomes in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants: A Pilot Study
Author(s):
Turrise, Stephanie L.; Falsafi, Nasrin; Pond, Richard S. Jr.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Omega
Author Details:
Stephanie L. Turrise, PhD, RN, BC, APRN, CNE, Professional Experience: I have been a nurse for 22 years. I am a certified medical surgical nurse and certified nurse educator. I have worked as an educator in the hospital working on hospital policies, patient education and staff education around cardiac care. I am currently an assistant professor and have taught in all levels of programs (ADN-Doctorate)and done face-to-face, hybrid, fully online and clinical education. My research focus is outcomes research, specifically in people with chronic heart disease as well as the use of self-regulation theory in populations with heart failure and in nursing education. Author Summary: Dr. Turrise is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at UNCW. She earned a PhD and MSN, Adult Nurse Practitioner from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark. She earned a post-Master’s certificate in Nursing Education and is a Certified Nurse Educator. Research interests include self-regulation in nursing education and in individuals with cardiovascular disease. She teaches across programs at UNCW.
Abstract:

Purpose:  The purpose of this pilot study is to assess the effectiveness of a mindfulness intervention compared to a non-intervention, control group (treatment as usual) on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in a sample of cardiac rehabiliation participants.

Methods: This study utilizes a quasi-experimental, repeated-measures design with participants randomly assigned by cohort to one of two groups: a mindfulness practices (including self-compassion) intervention group or a wait-list control group (i.e. treatment as usual). Fifty participants (25 per group) are being recruited from two sites with a phase II cardiac rehabilitation program in Southeastern North Carolina. Participants in the mindfulness intervention group receive eight weeks of assigned interventions in a group by a doctorally prepared psychiatric clinical nurse specialist who is also board certified as an advanced holistic nurse. Participants are asked to practice their mindfulness intervention for 20 minutes each day. They also receive a book on mindfulness and an MP3 player with soft music and audio-guided meditations on mindfulness and self-compassion. Participants in the control group receive treatment as usual, which includes general information on stress management and deep breathing exercises. All participants are given a journal to document their daily home practice and any important event related to their daily life and emotional state. For both groups, outcome measures are collected at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks (i.e., 4 weeks post intervention completion) and 24 weeks (i.e., 3 months post intervention completion). Outcomes include anxiety measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory short version (STAI), depression assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), anger measured with the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), hostility assessed with the hostility subscale of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect expanded version (PANAS-X; Watson & Clark, 1994), stress measured with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and health related quality of life measured by the MacNew Heart Disease Health Related Quality of Life questionnaire. Physiologic outcomes include body mass index and blood pressure. Rate of CR program completion will also be obtained.

Results: Pending completion of data collection and analysis.

Conclusion: Pending completion of data collection and analysis

Keywords:
Cardiac Rehabilitation; Chronic Illness; Mindfulness
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST676
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEffects of Mindfulness on Outcomes in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants: A Pilot Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurrise, Stephanie L.en
dc.contributor.authorFalsafi, Nasrinen
dc.contributor.authorPond, Richard S. Jr.en
dc.contributor.departmentNu Omegaen
dc.author.detailsStephanie L. Turrise, PhD, RN, BC, APRN, CNE, Professional Experience: I have been a nurse for 22 years. I am a certified medical surgical nurse and certified nurse educator. I have worked as an educator in the hospital working on hospital policies, patient education and staff education around cardiac care. I am currently an assistant professor and have taught in all levels of programs (ADN-Doctorate)and done face-to-face, hybrid, fully online and clinical education. My research focus is outcomes research, specifically in people with chronic heart disease as well as the use of self-regulation theory in populations with heart failure and in nursing education. Author Summary: Dr. Turrise is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at UNCW. She earned a PhD and MSN, Adult Nurse Practitioner from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark. She earned a post-Master’s certificate in Nursing Education and is a Certified Nurse Educator. Research interests include self-regulation in nursing education and in individuals with cardiovascular disease. She teaches across programs at UNCW.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622008-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> The purpose of this pilot study is to assess the effectiveness of a mindfulness intervention compared to a non-intervention, control group (treatment as usual) on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in a sample of cardiac rehabiliation participants.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>This study utilizes a quasi-experimental, repeated-measures design with participants randomly assigned by cohort to one of two groups: a mindfulness practices (including self-compassion) intervention group or a wait-list control group (i.e. treatment as usual). Fifty participants (25 per group) are being recruited from two sites with a phase II cardiac rehabilitation program in Southeastern North Carolina. Participants in the mindfulness intervention group receive eight weeks of assigned interventions in a group by a doctorally prepared psychiatric clinical nurse specialist who is also board certified as an advanced holistic nurse. Participants are asked to practice their mindfulness intervention for 20 minutes each day. They also receive a book on mindfulness and an MP3 player with soft music and audio-guided meditations on mindfulness and self-compassion. Participants in the control group receive treatment as usual, which includes general information on stress management and deep breathing exercises. All participants are given a journal to document their daily home practice and any important event related to their daily life and emotional state. For both groups, outcome measures are collected at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks (i.e., 4 weeks post intervention completion) and 24 weeks (i.e., 3 months post intervention completion). Outcomes include anxiety measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory short version (STAI), depression assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), anger measured with the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), hostility assessed with the hostility subscale of the Positive Affect and Negative Affect expanded version (PANAS-X; Watson & Clark, 1994), stress measured with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and health related quality of life measured by the MacNew Heart Disease Health Related Quality of Life questionnaire. Physiologic outcomes include body mass index and blood pressure. Rate of CR program completion will also be obtained.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Pending completion of data collection and analysis.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Pending completion of data collection and analysis</p>en
dc.subjectCardiac Rehabilitationen
dc.subjectChronic Illnessen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T14:21:52Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T14:21:52Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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