Complementary Medicine and Spirituality: Practices to Attain and Maintain Health Among Indian Immigrants

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622009
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Complementary Medicine and Spirituality: Practices to Attain and Maintain Health Among Indian Immigrants
Author(s):
Joseph, Rachel Abraham; Fernandes, Samantha Anne; Derstine, Sarah; McSpadden, Micaela
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Rachel Abraham Joseph, PhD, RN, CCRN, Professional Experience: 2013-Present West Chester University, West Chester PA 2010-Present Wilmington University, New Castle, DE 2009-Present Neonatal Nurse, Christiana Hospital, Newark, DE 2009-2013 University of DE, Newark, DE (clinical faculty) 1998-2009: Multiple roles (Staff Nurse, Clinical educator and quality improvement)at Nemours, Wilmington, DE 1985-1998 Multiple roles (Staff Nurse, Manager, program facilitator) Qaboos Hospital, Salalah, Oman. 2010-2013 Immaculata university (clinical & Classroom faculty) Author Summary: Dr. Rachel Joseph obtained her BSN from India, MSN from Wilmington University and PhD from Duquesne University, PA. She also participated in Summer Genetics Institute by the national Institute for Nursing Research in 2014. This study What makes a nurse was conducted in partnership with a student as part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Institute at West Chester University, PA where Rachel in a fulltime nursing faculty. She is also a NICU nurse.
Abstract:

Purpose: About five percent of immigrants to the United States are from India (Zong, Jie & Batalova, 2015). The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are quite common among Indians and upon migration to the U.S, they may continue to use CAM therapy for routine care, and access modern health care services for emergencies only (Rao, 2006). This can result in a lack of screening for certain diseases which may then delay diagnosis and treatment of that disease. The health seeking behaviors of Indian immigrants and their frequency of accessing preventative screening were not found in literature.

Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was initiated after obtaining the West Chester University (WCU) Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. Participants are being recruited using snowball method (word of mouth). Twenty in person interviews are planned and data collection is near completion. Data on demographics, current health and lifestyle, prevalence of chronic illness, factors that affect access to health care as well as health beliefs and attitudes are collected.

Results: The findings from this pilot study will guide evidenced based practice for Indian immigrants. Knowledge about the patient/family preference will help nurse clinicians to provide optimum care to clientele of Indian origin. Prevalence of CAM therapy may alert nurses to verify drug interactions and resources can be provided to meet their spiritual need. It is also important to identify the role that spirituality has health care behaviors so that health care professionals are able to create effective therapeutic regimes when caring for these individuals. This will enhance patient experience, promote excellence in nursing, and increase patient/family satisfaction.

Conclusion: Insurance plays a major role in the kind of healthcare that the family access. Many Indian immigrant families may prefer natural and Ayurveda treatment options as compared to pharmaceuticals and are more likely to turn to CAM first before seeking medical treatment. The role of faith and spirituality plays a major role in the overall health and healing of an individual.

Keywords:
Healthcare; Indians; Spirituality
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST393
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleComplementary Medicine and Spirituality: Practices to Attain and Maintain Health Among Indian Immigrantsen_US
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Rachel Abrahamen
dc.contributor.authorFernandes, Samantha Anneen
dc.contributor.authorDerstine, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorMcSpadden, Micaelaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsRachel Abraham Joseph, PhD, RN, CCRN, Professional Experience: 2013-Present West Chester University, West Chester PA 2010-Present Wilmington University, New Castle, DE 2009-Present Neonatal Nurse, Christiana Hospital, Newark, DE 2009-2013 University of DE, Newark, DE (clinical faculty) 1998-2009: Multiple roles (Staff Nurse, Clinical educator and quality improvement)at Nemours, Wilmington, DE 1985-1998 Multiple roles (Staff Nurse, Manager, program facilitator) Qaboos Hospital, Salalah, Oman. 2010-2013 Immaculata university (clinical & Classroom faculty) Author Summary: Dr. Rachel Joseph obtained her BSN from India, MSN from Wilmington University and PhD from Duquesne University, PA. She also participated in Summer Genetics Institute by the national Institute for Nursing Research in 2014. This study What makes a nurse was conducted in partnership with a student as part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Institute at West Chester University, PA where Rachel in a fulltime nursing faculty. She is also a NICU nurse.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622009-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>About five percent of immigrants to the United States are from India (Zong, Jie & Batalova, 2015). The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are quite common among Indians and upon migration to the U.S, they may continue to use CAM therapy for routine care, and access modern health care services for emergencies only (Rao, 2006). This can result in a lack of screening for certain diseases which may then delay diagnosis and treatment of that disease. The health seeking behaviors of Indian immigrants and their frequency of accessing preventative screening were not found in literature.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>This cross-sectional descriptive study was initiated after obtaining the West Chester University (WCU) Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. Participants are being recruited using snowball method (word of mouth). Twenty in person interviews are planned and data collection is near completion. Data on demographics, current health and lifestyle, prevalence of chronic illness, factors that affect access to health care as well as health beliefs and attitudes are collected.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The findings from this pilot study will guide evidenced based practice for Indian immigrants. Knowledge about the patient/family preference will help nurse clinicians to provide optimum care to clientele of Indian origin. Prevalence of CAM therapy may alert nurses to verify drug interactions and resources can be provided to meet their spiritual need. It is also important to identify the role that spirituality has health care behaviors so that health care professionals are able to create effective therapeutic regimes when caring for these individuals. This will enhance patient experience, promote excellence in nursing, and increase patient/family satisfaction.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Insurance plays a major role in the kind of healthcare that the family access. Many Indian immigrant families may prefer natural and Ayurveda treatment options as compared to pharmaceuticals and are more likely to turn to CAM first before seeking medical treatment. The role of faith and spirituality plays a major role in the overall health and healing of an individual.</p>en
dc.subjectHealthcareen
dc.subjectIndiansen
dc.subjectSpiritualityen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T14:43:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T14:43:17Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.