Somatic Countertransference Experiences of Nurse Therapeutic Touch Practitioners: A Content Analysis, Part 1: Body

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622010
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Somatic Countertransference Experiences of Nurse Therapeutic Touch Practitioners: A Content Analysis, Part 1: Body
Author(s):
Monetti, Catherine Jirak; Ezomo, Doris; Nwosonyiri, Dorothy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Iota
Author Details:
Catherine Jirak Monetti, PhD, RN, CNE, QTTP, Professional Experience: Catherine Jirak Monetti, PhD, RN, CNE, QTTP, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar, earned her Doctor of Philosophy from Rutgers, College of Nursing in May, 2014. She is trained in Gestalt Psychotherapy and EMDR Trauma Therapy. A former student of Dee Krieger, PhD, RN, she has been practicing TT and teaching undergraduate nursing since 1991; doctoral students since 2015. Her doctoral dissertation research was presented by poster at the 2014 CANS (Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science) State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research: Optimizing Health by Addressing Complexity, Washington, DC, September 17 - 20, 2014. For further information, please contact Dr. Monetti at cmj@monetti.com. Author Summary: Catherine Jirak Monetti, PhD, RN, CNE, QTTP, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar, earned her Doctor of Philosophy from Rutgers, College of Nursing in May, 2014. She is trained in Gestalt Psychotherapy and EMDR Trauma Therapy. A former student of Dee Krieger, PhD, RN, she has been practicing TT and teaching undergraduate nursing since 1991; doctoral students since 2015.
Abstract:

Abstract

Title: SOMATIC COUNTERTRANSFERENCE EXPERIENCES OF NURSE THERAPEUTIC TOUCH PRACTITIONERS: A CONTENT ANALYSIS. PART 1: BODY

This qualitative study describes somatic countertransference (SCT) experiences of nurse Therapeutic Touch practitioners. Defined by Orbach and Carroll (2006), SCT is “the therapist’s awareness of their own body, of sensations, images, impulses, and feelings that offer a link to the client’s healing process” (p. 64).

Purpose:

Use of purposeful sampling recruited eight experts. Audiotaped sixty-minute face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide with six open-ended questions. Sandelowski’s (2010)

Methods:

Preferred method of latent content analysis produced codes and subcategories grounded exclusively in the saturated data (Krippendorff, 2004). Ten subcategories and three categories were inductively generated. Consensus on coding and data analysis led to the emergent theme, “A Language for Healing Trauma.” Consistent with social science communication research (Krippendorff, 1989),

Results:

SCT was found to be a factor in the healing of trauma, experienced during the verbal and nonverbal communication of one group of nurse TT practitioners in interaction with traumatized clients.

Conclusion:

The results of this study demonstrate the phenomenon of SCT is indeed real and that it occurs in nurse TT practitioners. Importantly, it can be articulated and conceptualized as a language to describe a process of nonverbal communication whereby useful clinical information is garnered from clients’ somatic memory. In other words, TT can access the knowledge of the body beyond the use of words. The findings validate Leddy’s (2004) conclusion that actual physical touch and exchange of energy are not needed for energetic healing. This further articulation of SCT increases the limited expression of the non-linear experience of TT (Samarel, 1992). Given the multitude of trauma experiences in the clinical population, these findings contribute to knowledge about the phenomenon of SCT and the significant role TT plays in trauma treatment. Of course, further description of SCT is needed, as well as related outcomes.

Keywords:
therapeutic touch practitioners; somatic countertransference; trauma therapy
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST143
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleSomatic Countertransference Experiences of Nurse Therapeutic Touch Practitioners: A Content Analysis, Part 1: Bodyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMonetti, Catherine Jiraken
dc.contributor.authorEzomo, Dorisen
dc.contributor.authorNwosonyiri, Dorothyen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Iotaen
dc.author.detailsCatherine Jirak Monetti, PhD, RN, CNE, QTTP, Professional Experience: Catherine Jirak Monetti, PhD, RN, CNE, QTTP, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar, earned her Doctor of Philosophy from Rutgers, College of Nursing in May, 2014. She is trained in Gestalt Psychotherapy and EMDR Trauma Therapy. A former student of Dee Krieger, PhD, RN, she has been practicing TT and teaching undergraduate nursing since 1991; doctoral students since 2015. Her doctoral dissertation research was presented by poster at the 2014 CANS (Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science) State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research: Optimizing Health by Addressing Complexity, Washington, DC, September 17 - 20, 2014. For further information, please contact Dr. Monetti at cmj@monetti.com. Author Summary: Catherine Jirak Monetti, PhD, RN, CNE, QTTP, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar, earned her Doctor of Philosophy from Rutgers, College of Nursing in May, 2014. She is trained in Gestalt Psychotherapy and EMDR Trauma Therapy. A former student of Dee Krieger, PhD, RN, she has been practicing TT and teaching undergraduate nursing since 1991; doctoral students since 2015.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622010-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Abstract</strong></p> <p class="APA" align="center">Title: SOMATIC COUNTERTRANSFERENCE EXPERIENCES OF NURSE THERAPEUTIC TOUCH PRACTITIONERS: A CONTENT ANALYSIS. PART 1: BODY</p> <p>This qualitative study describes somatic countertransference (SCT) experiences of nurse Therapeutic Touch practitioners. Defined by Orbach and Carroll (2006), SCT is “the therapist’s awareness of their own body, of sensations, images, impulses, and feelings that offer a link to the client’s healing process” (p. 64).</p> <p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Use of purposeful sampling recruited eight experts. Audiotaped sixty-minute face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide with six open-ended questions. Sandelowski’s (2010)</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>Preferred method of latent content analysis produced codes and subcategories grounded exclusively in the saturated data (Krippendorff, 2004). Ten subcategories and three categories were inductively generated. Consensus on coding and data analysis led to the emergent theme, “A Language for Healing Trauma.” Consistent with social science communication research (Krippendorff, 1989),</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>SCT was found to be a factor in the healing of trauma, experienced during the verbal and nonverbal communication of one group of nurse TT practitioners in interaction with traumatized clients.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The results of this study demonstrate the phenomenon of SCT is indeed real and that it occurs in nurse TT practitioners. Importantly, it can be articulated and conceptualized as a language to describe a process of nonverbal communication whereby useful clinical information is garnered from clients’ somatic memory. In other words, TT can access the knowledge of the body beyond the use of words. The findings validate Leddy’s (2004) conclusion that actual physical touch and exchange of energy are not needed for energetic healing. This further articulation of SCT increases the limited expression of the non-linear experience of TT (Samarel, 1992). Given the multitude of trauma experiences in the clinical population, these findings contribute to knowledge about the phenomenon of SCT and the significant role TT plays in trauma treatment. Of course, further description of SCT is needed, as well as related outcomes.</p>en
dc.subjecttherapeutic touch practitionersen
dc.subjectsomatic countertransferenceen
dc.subjecttrauma therapyen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T16:07:38Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T16:07:38Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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