Public Health, the Environment, and Nursing Practice: Health Promotion in a Toxic World

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622017
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Public Health, the Environment, and Nursing Practice: Health Promotion in a Toxic World
Author(s):
Boros, Hacah U.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Upsilon-at-Large
Author Details:
Hacah U. Boros, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: 2013-present--Environmental Health Coordinator, CT Nurses’ Association, Berlin, CT 2013-present--Nursing Faculty, Adjunct, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT 2012-2013--Clinical Supervisor,Allpointe Homecare, Cheshire, CT 2008-2012--Case management, Staff Development Coordinator, Willcare/Patient’s Choice Home Care, Wethersfield, CT Author Summary: Hacah Boros, RN MSN has been a nurse for over 18 years. Since 2013 she has been the Environmental Health Coordinator for the CT Nurses’ Association. Coordinating with CNA’s government relations committee, national environmental health groups, and the Coalition for a Safe and Healthy CT to pass health protective policies in Connecticut. This includes educating nurses and communities across the state on the health impacts of exposures to toxic chemicals.
Abstract:

Purpose: Nurses are at the forefront of community and preventative health as educators and practitioners. It is imperative that they provide comprehensive, quality care as it relates to environmental health issues; acknowledging advances in research that are exposing the correlation between chemicals and our body burden. The incidence of many serious diseases and disorders are on the rise and understanding the link to environmental exposures is critical. There is growing consensus among the scientific and medical community that exposure to toxic chemicals in our every day environment including those found in building products, plastics, personal care products and household cleaners, are linked to the rise of many of these diseases. The President’s Cancer Panel Report (2010) noted the link between chemicals and cancer has actually been significantly underestimated, as over 80,000 chemicals in commerce have been largely unregulated and untested. The Panel wrote: “the American people—even before they are born—are bombarded continually with myriad combinations of these dangerous exposures…that needlessly increase health care costs, cripple our Nation’s productivity, and devastate American lives.” [1] Through review of research there is a knowledge gap within nursing as it relates to this body of knowledge; which impacts nursing care and population health.

Methods: Surveys are being created for distribution to nursing schools and hospitals, within the state of Connecticut (USA), that will assess for the need for inclusion of curriculum, annual education and continuing education offerings to assess for environmental health issues, and the nurse's role in assessment and care. An educational webinar is also being offered to provide information on environmental health issues and related nursing interventions, with a pre/post test to assess for competency.

Results: This project is in process, however based on current research it is apparent that there remains a needs gap. The gap shows enhanced education requirements to create competency and nursing leadership in public health.

Conclusion: Environmental factors often disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations. Exposure to toxic, environmental chemicals during critical windows of development (even prenatally) are linked to adverse health outcomes that span a lifetime and also impact fertility and pregnancy. In addition to the health impacts of chemical exposure, the economic impacts are staggering. The NIH projects that cancer costs will reach at least $158 billion by 2020. [2] Nurses are well suited to be leaders in protecting the public through environmental health education, evaluation, and research to incorporate this expanded view of environmental health. Therefore it is imperative that this knowledge be interwoven into nursing curriculum and offered as continuing education in all practice areas within nursing to improve competency.

Keywords:
education; environmental toxins; public health
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST564
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePublic Health, the Environment, and Nursing Practice: Health Promotion in a Toxic Worlden_US
dc.contributor.authorBoros, Hacah U.en
dc.contributor.departmentIota Upsilon-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsHacah U. Boros, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: 2013-present--Environmental Health Coordinator, CT Nurses’ Association, Berlin, CT 2013-present--Nursing Faculty, Adjunct, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT 2012-2013--Clinical Supervisor,Allpointe Homecare, Cheshire, CT 2008-2012--Case management, Staff Development Coordinator, Willcare/Patient’s Choice Home Care, Wethersfield, CT Author Summary: Hacah Boros, RN MSN has been a nurse for over 18 years. Since 2013 she has been the Environmental Health Coordinator for the CT Nurses’ Association. Coordinating with CNA’s government relations committee, national environmental health groups, and the Coalition for a Safe and Healthy CT to pass health protective policies in Connecticut. This includes educating nurses and communities across the state on the health impacts of exposures to toxic chemicals.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622017-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Nurses are at the forefront of community and preventative health as educators and practitioners. It is imperative that they provide comprehensive, quality care as it relates to environmental health issues; acknowledging advances in research that are exposing the correlation between chemicals and our body burden. The incidence of many serious diseases and disorders are on the rise and understanding the link to environmental exposures is critical. There is growing consensus among the scientific and medical community that exposure to toxic chemicals in our every day environment including those found in building products, plastics, personal care products and household cleaners, are linked to the rise of many of these diseases. The President’s Cancer Panel Report (2010) noted the link between chemicals and cancer has actually been significantly underestimated, as over 80,000 chemicals in commerce have been largely unregulated and untested. The Panel wrote: “the American people—even before they are born—are bombarded continually with myriad combinations of these dangerous exposures…that needlessly increase health care costs, cripple our Nation’s productivity, and devastate American lives.” [1] Through review of research there is a knowledge gap within nursing as it relates to this body of knowledge; which impacts nursing care and population health.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>Surveys are being created for distribution to nursing schools and hospitals, within the state of Connecticut (USA), that will assess for the need for inclusion of curriculum, annual education and continuing education offerings to assess for environmental health issues, and the nurse's role in assessment and care. An educational webinar is also being offered to provide information on environmental health issues and related nursing interventions, with a pre/post test to assess for competency.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>This project is in process, however based on current research it is apparent that there remains a needs gap. The gap shows enhanced education requirements to create competency and nursing leadership in public health.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Environmental factors often disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations. Exposure to toxic, environmental chemicals during critical windows of development (even prenatally) are linked to adverse health outcomes that span a lifetime and also impact fertility and pregnancy. In addition to the health impacts of chemical exposure, the economic impacts are staggering. The NIH projects that cancer costs will reach at least $158 billion by 2020. [2] Nurses are well suited to be leaders in protecting the public through environmental health education, evaluation, and research to incorporate this expanded view of environmental health. Therefore it is imperative that this knowledge be interwoven into nursing curriculum and offered as continuing education in all practice areas within nursing to improve competency.</p>en
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectenvironmental toxinsen
dc.subjectpublic healthen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T17:02:21Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T17:02:21Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.