Association Between Age-Related Hearing Loss and Disability in Older Adults: A Systematic Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622020
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Association Between Age-Related Hearing Loss and Disability in Older Adults: A Systematic Review
Other Titles:
Declining Functional Status in the Aging Adult
Author(s):
Lin, Tzu-Chia; Yen, Miaofen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Tzu-Chia Lin, MS, Professional Experience: 2016-present--PhD Student, National Cheng Kung University,Tainan City, Taiwan 2011-present--Registered Nurse,Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan 2009-2011 -- Master Student, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan 2007-2009-- Research Assistant, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 2005-2007--Registered Nurse,Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Author Summary: Tzu-Chia Lin, as a PhD student and registered nurse in Chiayi christian hospital, is familiar with geriatric nursing, chronic kidney disease management, plastic surgical care, instrumental design, quality improvement project, rehabilitation, institutionalized care, long-term care, evidence-based nursing.
Abstract:

Purpose:  Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the loss of hearing or proportional to the degree of hearing impairment that gradually occurs as we grow older. ARHL management also consumes an increasing portion of healthcare expenditures given the rising mean age of people. Previous studies have investigated the association of ARHL and disability in older adults, but the results are inconsistent. However, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors such as hearing loss would provide a substantial public health benefit. Therefore, the aim of the study was to comprehensively evaluate the evidence connecting ARHL to disability in older adults.

Methods:  Studies were identified through systematic searches of the electronic databases of Medline, Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane library, Airiti library. Bibliographic of retrieved articles were also searched. The following Mesh subject terms and keywords were used: hearing impairment, hearing loss, presbycusis, hearing handicap, deafness, disability, activities of daily living, older adults, elderly, aged, aging, senior. Two reviewers independently reviewed the abstract and selected studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were: (1) the study population involved individuals with age-related hearing loss/hearing impairment/presbycusis; (2) there was a predetermined definition of hearing loss/hearing impairment/presbycusis and reported disability outcome assessment; (3) cohort study. Exclusion criteria were: (1) non-English nor Chinese publication; (2) not primary research; (3) outcome not of interest. Retrieved articles were independently assessed by two raters for reporting quality using Newcastle Ottawa quality assessment scale (NOS).

Results:  Ten eligible studies were identified. Only one of the 10 studies used gold-standard audiometric testing (inability to hear a tone of 40 dB or greater at 2,000 Hz frequency in the better ear is regarded as having ARHL) to evaluate hearing loss, whereas the other nine studies relied on self-report hearing problems with various questionnaires. The ARHL prevalence was from 15.7% to 28.0%. 8.6% to 57.1% participants with ARHL at baseline became disability. Compare to those without ARHL at baseline, the percentage of becoming disability is higher in participants with ARHL. The odds of disability were 0.80-7.93 times greater among older adults with hearing loss than older adults with normal hearing. However, most studies reveals that ARHL was not associated with increased odds of disability among participants with ARHL at baseline, after adjusting the covariates.

Conclusion: In the published literature, ARHL was not associated with a significantly increased odds of disability in older adults. However, HL is a gradual condition, and the limit between normal and not normal must be defined along a continuous scale.

Keywords:
age-related hearing loss; disability; elderly
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17E13
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleAssociation Between Age-Related Hearing Loss and Disability in Older Adults: A Systematic Reviewen_US
dc.title.alternativeDeclining Functional Status in the Aging Adulten
dc.contributor.authorLin, Tzu-Chiaen
dc.contributor.authorYen, Miaofenen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsTzu-Chia Lin, MS, Professional Experience: 2016-present--PhD Student, National Cheng Kung University,Tainan City, Taiwan 2011-present--Registered Nurse,Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan 2009-2011 -- Master Student, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan 2007-2009-- Research Assistant, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 2005-2007--Registered Nurse,Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Author Summary: Tzu-Chia Lin, as a PhD student and registered nurse in Chiayi christian hospital, is familiar with geriatric nursing, chronic kidney disease management, plastic surgical care, instrumental design, quality improvement project, rehabilitation, institutionalized care, long-term care, evidence-based nursing.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622020-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the loss of hearing or proportional to the degree of hearing impairment that gradually occurs as we grow older. ARHL management also consumes an increasing portion of healthcare expenditures given the rising mean age of people. Previous studies have investigated the association of ARHL and disability in older adults, but the results are inconsistent. However, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors such as hearing loss would provide a substantial public health benefit. Therefore, the aim of the study was to comprehensively evaluate the evidence connecting ARHL to disability in older adults.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> Studies were identified through systematic searches of the electronic databases of Medline, Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane library, Airiti library. Bibliographic of retrieved articles were also searched. The following Mesh subject terms and keywords were used: hearing impairment, hearing loss, presbycusis, hearing handicap, deafness, disability, activities of daily living, older adults, elderly, aged, aging, senior. Two reviewers independently reviewed the abstract and selected studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were: (1) the study population involved individuals with age-related hearing loss/hearing impairment/presbycusis; (2) there was a predetermined definition of hearing loss/hearing impairment/presbycusis and reported disability outcome assessment; (3) cohort study. Exclusion criteria were: (1) non-English nor Chinese publication; (2) not primary research; (3) outcome not of interest. Retrieved articles were independently assessed by two raters for reporting quality using Newcastle Ottawa quality assessment scale (NOS).</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> Ten eligible studies were identified. Only one of the 10 studies used gold-standard audiometric testing (inability to hear a tone of 40 dB or greater at 2,000 Hz frequency in the better ear is regarded as having ARHL) to evaluate hearing loss, whereas the other nine studies relied on self-report hearing problems with various questionnaires. The ARHL prevalence was from 15.7% to 28.0%. 8.6% to 57.1% participants with ARHL at baseline became disability. Compare to those without ARHL at baseline, the percentage of becoming disability is higher in participants with ARHL. The odds of disability were 0.80-7.93 times greater among older adults with hearing loss than older adults with normal hearing. However, most studies reveals that ARHL was not associated with increased odds of disability among participants with ARHL at baseline, after adjusting the covariates.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>In the published literature, ARHL was not associated with a significantly increased odds of disability in older adults. However, HL is a gradual condition, and the limit between normal and not normal must be defined along a continuous scale.</p>en
dc.subjectage-related hearing lossen
dc.subjectdisabilityen
dc.subjectelderlyen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T17:37:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T17:37:17Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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