Development Trajectory of a Fall Detection Device Involving Community-Dwelling Older People

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622023
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Development Trajectory of a Fall Detection Device Involving Community-Dwelling Older People
Other Titles:
Factors Influencing Patient Care for the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse
Author(s):
Thilo, Friederike J. S.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Halfens, Ruud J. G.; Hahn, Sabine
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Friederike J. S. Thilo, MScN, RN, Professional Experience: Co-investigator in a research project exploring both the use and non-use of fall detection technologies in daily life, from the perspective of community-dwelling older people, relatives and health professionals. Involved as research associate in three research projects, two of which are completed, focusing on user involvement in the development of a health-related technologies. Author Summary: Friederike J.S. Thilo is PhD-Student of Maastricht University, Netherlands and is a research associate of Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland. Her research interests are health literacy, falls, eHealth, meaningful use and user involvement in the development of health-related Technologies.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The aim of the study was to explore and consider the needs, requirements, feasibility and usability aspects of daily life from the perspective of community-dwelling older people, by involving them interactively in the development of a wearable fall detection sensor, including its smartphone application.

Methods:

A qualitative descriptive study was chosen. Community-dwelling older people, 75 years and older, were involved in two stages of device development using the theoretical framework of Shah et al. (2009). They were involved in the device design and mock-up evaluation stage and in the real field prototype testing stage of the fall detection device. In the first stage, the needs and requirements of the participants regarding the mock-up (not functional prototype) were explored using focus group interviews. Based on those findings the fall detection prototype was developed. One year later, participants tested its feasibility and usability for nine days in daily life, and participated in a focus group interview. Data was analysed using content analysis with the application of deductive coding.

Results:

22 participants took part in the device design and mock-up evaluation, and 15 participants tested the fall detection prototype for nine days in their daily life. The average age was 80.7 years.

The 24 hour wearing comfort of the lightweight, waterproof, body-worn sensor was high. The automatic alerting process in case of a fall met the needs of the participants. The manual alerting option was useful, as other emergency situations might occur. It was recommended that blinking lights be added in order to locate the sensor more easily. However, the smartphone did not adequately meet the needs of the participants due to: high battery consumption; difficulties using the touch-screen; and limited range between smartphone and sensor of eight to ten meters which was considered as limiting activities in daily life. In general, the smartphone application satisfied the requirements of participants as it was easy to manipulate, false alerts could be manually stopped and the design and acoustics were pleasant.

Having several contact persons in case of an alert was required by the participants. It was emphasized that at least one health professional should be included in order to verify a reply in case of an alert, which would increase the feeling of security. Utilizing relatives, friends or neighbours as contacts may lead to the feeling of being a bother, which may be a barrier for use of a fall detection device. Additionally, the participants highlighted that they would prefer more coaching and training in using this fall detection device.

The added value of user involvement was amongst others that it enabled the focus to remain on the most needed aspects from the perspective of users, instead of focusing solely on the technological aspects. The challenges of user involvement were the establishment of a shared language with engineers and financial and time resources.

Conclusion:

The study demonstrated that older people contribute in a «needs-driven» way, to the development of a fall detection device. Involving users is valuable because it enables researchers to go beyond factors related to the technology itself, by identifying barriers and facilitators in the daily use of fall detection devices. It is important that nurses are aware of and familiar with new technologies, since they have a key role in instructing and supporting patients in their use.

Keywords:
fall detection device; qualitative descriptive study; user involvement
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17E06
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleDevelopment Trajectory of a Fall Detection Device Involving Community-Dwelling Older Peopleen_US
dc.title.alternativeFactors Influencing Patient Care for the Advanced Practice Registered Nurseen
dc.contributor.authorThilo, Friederike J. S.en
dc.contributor.authorSchols, Jos M. G. A.en
dc.contributor.authorHalfens, Ruud J. G.en
dc.contributor.authorHahn, Sabineen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsFriederike J. S. Thilo, MScN, RN, Professional Experience: Co-investigator in a research project exploring both the use and non-use of fall detection technologies in daily life, from the perspective of community-dwelling older people, relatives and health professionals. Involved as research associate in three research projects, two of which are completed, focusing on user involvement in the development of a health-related technologies. Author Summary: Friederike J.S. Thilo is PhD-Student of Maastricht University, Netherlands and is a research associate of Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland. Her research interests are health literacy, falls, eHealth, meaningful use and user involvement in the development of health-related Technologies.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622023-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The aim of the study was to explore and consider the needs, requirements, feasibility and usability aspects of daily life from the perspective of community-dwelling older people, by involving them interactively in the development of a wearable fall detection sensor, including its smartphone application.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>A qualitative descriptive study was chosen. Community-dwelling older people, 75 years and older, were involved in two stages of device development using the theoretical framework of Shah et al. (2009). They were involved in the device design and mock-up evaluation stage and in the real field prototype testing stage of the fall detection device. In the first stage, the needs and requirements of the participants regarding the mock-up (not functional prototype) were explored using focus group interviews. Based on those findings the fall detection prototype was developed. One year later, participants tested its feasibility and usability for nine days in daily life, and participated in a focus group interview. Data was analysed using content analysis with the application of deductive coding.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>22 participants took part in the device design and mock-up evaluation, and 15 participants tested the fall detection prototype for nine days in their daily life. The average age was 80.7 years.</p> <p>The 24 hour wearing comfort of the lightweight, waterproof, body-worn sensor was high. The automatic alerting process in case of a fall met the needs of the participants. The manual alerting option was useful, as other emergency situations might occur. It was recommended that blinking lights be added in order to locate the sensor more easily. However, the smartphone did not adequately meet the needs of the participants due to: high battery consumption; difficulties using the touch-screen; and limited range between smartphone and sensor of eight to ten meters which was considered as limiting activities in daily life. In general, the smartphone application satisfied the requirements of participants as it was easy to manipulate, false alerts could be manually stopped and the design and acoustics were pleasant.</p> <p>Having several contact persons in case of an alert was required by the participants. It was emphasized that at least one health professional should be included in order to verify a reply in case of an alert, which would increase the feeling of security. Utilizing relatives, friends or neighbours as contacts may lead to the feeling of being a bother, which may be a barrier for use of a fall detection device. Additionally, the participants highlighted that they would prefer more coaching and training in using this fall detection device.</p> <p>The added value of user involvement was amongst others that it enabled the focus to remain on the most needed aspects from the perspective of users, instead of focusing solely on the technological aspects. The challenges of user involvement were the establishment of a shared language with engineers and financial and time resources.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The study demonstrated that older people contribute in a «needs-driven» way, to the development of a fall detection device. Involving users is valuable because it enables researchers to go beyond factors related to the technology itself, by identifying barriers and facilitators in the daily use of fall detection devices. It is important that nurses are aware of and familiar with new technologies, since they have a key role in instructing and supporting patients in their use.</p>en
dc.subjectfall detection deviceen
dc.subjectqualitative descriptive studyen
dc.subjectuser involvementen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T18:14:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T18:14:33Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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