Demoralization Syndrome Affects Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in Patients With Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622029
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Demoralization Syndrome Affects Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in Patients With Heart Failure
Other Titles:
Cardiac Disease Health Promotion
Author(s):
Chen, Hsing-Mei; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Shie, Yun-Han
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Hsing-Mei Chen, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: After working as a critical care nurse for eight years and a nursing instructor for four years,I enrolled to The University of Texas at Austin doctoral program in fall, 2003, and received my PhD in nursing in may 2007.My specialty focuses on cardiovascular nursing and critical care. Currently, My published articles involving several areas including sleep, heart failure, pacemaker care, and quality of life. Author Summary: Dr. Hsing-Mei Chen currently is assistant professor in Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. Her specialties are cardiovascular nursing and critical care nursing. She has devoted herself to the heart failure research for 10 years. Her current study focuses on self-care intervention to improve self-care, quality of life, and readmission of the patients.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important outcome measure for guiding appropriate and effective therapeutic interventions for patients with heart failure (HF). Demoralization syndrome consists of a cluster of emotional symptoms including loss of meaning, dysphoria, disheartenment, helplessness, and sense of failure. Patients with demoralization syndrome may have poor quality of life. To date, information about the relationship between demoralization syndrome and HRQOL in patients with HF, however, is still lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between demoralization syndrome and HQROL in patients with HF.

Methods:

A cross-sectional correlational research design was employed, and a convenience sample of 120 heart failure participants was recruited from a medical center located in southern Taiwan. Measurements included Demoralization Scale, and Left Ventricular Dysfunction questionnaire. Bivariate analysis and hierarchical multiple regression analysis were carried out to test the relationship between demoralization syndrome and HRQOL.

Results:

The mean age was 64.95 (SD 13.67) years with a majority of male (71%), married (80%), unemployed (68%), sufficient financial status (84%), and New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II (74%). The bivariate analyses showed that HRQOL was significantly associated with age (r = 0.22, p < 0.05), education (F = 3.08, p < 0.05), employment status (F=6.08, p<0.001), NYHA Class (t = -3.80, p < 0.001), and all demoralization domains and total score (r = 0.26, p <0.01 to r = 0.53, p <0.001). A two-step hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that the significant determinants of HRQOL were age (β= 0.24, CI = 0.04-0.22), financial status (β= -0.29, CI = -8.62- -2.05), NYHA Class (0.17, CI = 0.13-5.44), demoralization-disheartenment (β= 0.40, CI = 0.33-1.16), and demoralization-sense of failure (β= 0.21, CI = 0.06-0.41). The total model explained 40.2% of the variance in HRQOL, with demoralization domains accounting for 12.1% of the variance.

Conclusion:

HF participants who were elderly, had poor financial status, identified as NYHA Class III and IV, reported higher disheartenment, and perceived greater sense of failure experienced poor HRQOL. The study suggests demoralization syndrome is common in patients with HF and should be early identified to maintain HRQOL of the patients.

Keywords:
demoralization syndrome; health-related quality of life; heart failure
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17D14
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleDemoralization Syndrome Affects Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in Patients With Heart Failureen_US
dc.title.alternativeCardiac Disease Health Promotionen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hsing-Meien
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Liang-Miinen
dc.contributor.authorShie, Yun-Hanen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsHsing-Mei Chen, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: After working as a critical care nurse for eight years and a nursing instructor for four years,I enrolled to The University of Texas at Austin doctoral program in fall, 2003, and received my PhD in nursing in may 2007.My specialty focuses on cardiovascular nursing and critical care. Currently, My published articles involving several areas including sleep, heart failure, pacemaker care, and quality of life. Author Summary: Dr. Hsing-Mei Chen currently is assistant professor in Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. Her specialties are cardiovascular nursing and critical care nursing. She has devoted herself to the heart failure research for 10 years. Her current study focuses on self-care intervention to improve self-care, quality of life, and readmission of the patients.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622029-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important outcome measure for guiding appropriate and effective therapeutic interventions for patients with heart failure (HF). Demoralization syndrome consists of a cluster of emotional symptoms including loss of meaning, dysphoria, disheartenment, helplessness, and sense of failure. Patients with demoralization syndrome may have poor quality of life. To date, information about the relationship between demoralization syndrome and HRQOL in patients with HF, however, is still lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between demoralization syndrome and HQROL in patients with HF.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p><span lang="EN-US">A cross-sectional correlational research design was employed, and a convenience sample of 120 heart failure participants was recruited from a medical center located in southern Taiwan. Measurements included Demoralization Scale, and Left Ventricular Dysfunction questionnaire. Bivariate analysis and hierarchical multiple regression analysis were carried out to test the relationship between demoralization syndrome and HRQOL.</span></p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The mean age was 64.95 (SD 13.67) years with a majority of male (71%), married (80%), unemployed (68%), sufficient financial status (84%), and New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II (74%). The bivariate analyses showed that HRQOL was significantly associated with age (r = 0.22, p < 0.05), education (F = 3.08, p < 0.05), employment status (F=6.08, p<0.001), NYHA Class (t = -3.80, p < 0.001), and all demoralization domains and total score (r = 0.26, p <0.01 to r = 0.53, p <0.001). A two-step hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that the significant determinants of HRQOL were age (β= 0.24, CI = 0.04-0.22), financial status (β= -0.29, CI = -8.62- -2.05), NYHA Class (0.17, CI = 0.13-5.44), demoralization-disheartenment (β= 0.40, CI = 0.33-1.16), and demoralization-sense of failure (β= 0.21, CI = 0.06-0.41). The total model explained 40.2% of the variance in HRQOL, with demoralization domains accounting for 12.1% of the variance.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>HF participants who were elderly, had poor financial status, identified as NYHA Class III and IV, reported higher disheartenment, and perceived greater sense of failure experienced poor HRQOL. The study suggests demoralization syndrome is common in patients with HF and should be early identified to maintain HRQOL of the patients.</p>en
dc.subjectdemoralization syndromeen
dc.subjecthealth-related quality of lifeen
dc.subjectheart failureen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T19:39:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T19:39:24Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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