Upward Violence in Nursing: A Scoping Review of a Phenomenon of Importance for Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622033
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Upward Violence in Nursing: A Scoping Review of a Phenomenon of Importance for Nursing
Other Titles:
Civility in Education and Practice
Author(s):
Gaudine, Alice Pauline; Patrick, Linda J.; Busby, Lorraine A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Alice Pauline Gaudine, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have a master's degree in nursing and a doctoral degree in administration (organizational behaviour). My clinical area of expertise is mental health nursing. I have written a textbook on nursing leadership that includes violence among nurses. Author Summary: Alice Gaudine is Dean and professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland School of Nursing. Her research interests are in the area of nursing leadership, and the ethical conflicts of nurses and other health professionals. She has published on topics such as ethical conflicts of nurses, nurses’ work life, absenteeism and turnover. She is also co-author with Dr. Marianne Lamb of Nursing Leadership and Management: Working in Canadian Healthcare Organizations, a textbook for senior nursing students.
Abstract:

Purpose:

To describe what is known about upward violence in the workplace through a scoping review of the literature. Upward violence includes violence that is directed from staff to people in positions of authority including staff nurses to nurse managers (Branch, Ramsey & Barker, 2013; Gaudine and Lamb 2015). Upward violence may include physical violence and property damage, but it can also be demonstrated through verbal threats and behaviours such as rudeness, socially ostracizing, bullying, mobbing, or passive aggressive behaviours.

The specific objectives of this presentation are: 1) to define and to describe upward violence; 2) to identify related nursing literature about upward violence and other literature to frame key issues through presenting the findings of a scoping review on upward violence; 3) to identify implications for nursing practice and research.

Background:

There is a growing body of literature on violence in the workplace including among nurses (e.g., Budin, Brewer & Kovner, 2013; Chen, Ku & Yang, 2012). Recent research in this area includes the widespread prevalence of this phenomenon (e.g.,Dumont, Meisinger, Whitacre & Corbin, 2012). Registered nurses have recognized violence in their profession as a major problem since Meissner (1986) first coined the term “nurses eat their young” in her landmark article. Meissner’s work led to recognition of vertical violence, or the violence of senior nurses to new nurses. Since the 1970s, the terms horizontal violence, lateral violence, bullying, incivility, and mobbing have been used to describe the violence of nurses towards other nurses. Traditionally, vertical violence among nurses was viewed as the behavior of nurse managers towards their employees, or the violence of nurse instructors towards their students. This violence can be described as downward violence.

Methods:

We will present the findings of a scoping review of the literature that addressed the question “What is known about upward violence in the workplace?” The search strategy included literature on workplace violence, workplace conflict, and 360-degree performance appraisals from 2006 to the present. We also considered legal cases of employees against managers. From this review of the literature, we outline key concepts related to upward violence. We also identify what is known and what is not known about the phenomenon of upward violence.

Results:

Upward violence is the violence that nursing students may direct to a nursing instructor, that nurses direct to a nurse manager, or that nursing faculty members direct towards their nursing director or dean. Upward violence has the potential to be a major threat to nurses entering and remaining in leadership positions. Upward violence is contrary to the assumption that vertical violence is directed downward because nurse managers and nurse instructors are in positions of authority and are the ones with the “tools” to cause harm to their subordinates. In reality, vertical violence that is upward can cause harm to nurse leaders and be a significant issue for practice. In today’s context, nurses are often unionized and students are in programs with regulations that protect them.

Conclusion:

The results of this scoping review provide working definitions, and conceptual boundaries of upward violence. The research gaps identified are useful to inform future studies. The implications of upward violence for nursing practice and education will be outlined in the presentation.

Keywords:
Nursing; Scoping Review; Upward Violence
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17M12
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleUpward Violence in Nursing: A Scoping Review of a Phenomenon of Importance for Nursingen_US
dc.title.alternativeCivility in Education and Practiceen
dc.contributor.authorGaudine, Alice Paulineen
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, Linda J.en
dc.contributor.authorBusby, Lorraine A.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsAlice Pauline Gaudine, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have a master's degree in nursing and a doctoral degree in administration (organizational behaviour). My clinical area of expertise is mental health nursing. I have written a textbook on nursing leadership that includes violence among nurses. Author Summary: Alice Gaudine is Dean and professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland School of Nursing. Her research interests are in the area of nursing leadership, and the ethical conflicts of nurses and other health professionals. She has published on topics such as ethical conflicts of nurses, nurses’ work life, absenteeism and turnover. She is also co-author with Dr. Marianne Lamb of Nursing Leadership and Management: Working in Canadian Healthcare Organizations, a textbook for senior nursing students.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622033-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose:</strong></strong></p> <p>To describe what is known about upward violence in the workplace through a scoping review of the literature. Upward violence includes violence that is directed from staff to people in positions of authority including staff nurses to nurse managers (Branch, Ramsey & Barker, 2013; Gaudine and Lamb 2015). Upward violence may include physical violence and property damage, but it can also be demonstrated through verbal threats and behaviours such as rudeness, socially ostracizing, bullying, mobbing, or passive aggressive behaviours.</p> <p>The specific objectives of this presentation are: 1) to define and to describe upward violence; 2) to identify related nursing literature about upward violence and other literature to frame key issues through presenting the findings of a scoping review on upward violence; 3) to identify implications for nursing practice and research.</p> <p><strong>Background:</strong><strong></strong></p> <p>There is a growing body of literature on violence in the workplace including among nurses (e.g., Budin, Brewer & Kovner, 2013; Chen, Ku & Yang, 2012). Recent research in this area includes the widespread prevalence of this phenomenon (e.g.,Dumont, Meisinger, Whitacre & Corbin, 2012). Registered nurses have recognized violence in their profession as a major problem since Meissner (1986) first coined the term “nurses eat their young” in her landmark article. Meissner’s work led to recognition of vertical violence, or the violence of senior nurses to new nurses. Since the 1970s, the terms horizontal violence, lateral violence, bullying, incivility, and mobbing have been used to describe the violence of nurses towards other nurses. Traditionally, vertical violence among nurses was viewed as the behavior of nurse managers towards their employees, or the violence of nurse instructors towards their students. This violence can be described as downward violence.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>We will present the findings of a scoping review of the literature that addressed the question “What is known about upward violence in the workplace?” The search strategy included literature on workplace violence, workplace conflict, and 360-degree performance appraisals from 2006 to the present. We also considered legal cases of employees against managers. From this review of the literature, we outline key concepts related to upward violence. We also identify what is known and what is not known about the phenomenon of upward violence.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Upward violence is the violence that nursing students may direct to a nursing instructor, that nurses direct to a nurse manager, or that nursing faculty members direct towards their nursing director or dean. Upward violence has the potential to be a major threat to nurses entering and remaining in leadership positions. Upward violence is contrary to the assumption that vertical violence is directed downward because nurse managers and nurse instructors are in positions of authority and are the ones with the “tools” to cause harm to their subordinates. In reality, vertical violence that is upward can cause harm to nurse leaders and be a significant issue for practice. In today’s context, nurses are often unionized and students are in programs with regulations that protect them.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The results of this scoping review provide working definitions, and conceptual boundaries of upward violence. The research gaps identified are useful to inform future studies. The implications of upward violence for nursing practice and education will be outlined in the presentation.</p>en
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectScoping Reviewen
dc.subjectUpward Violenceen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T20:30:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T20:30:32Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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