State of the Science on Clinical Evaluation of Competence in Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622034
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
State of the Science on Clinical Evaluation of Competence in Nursing Education
Other Titles:
Clinical Competency Progression
Author(s):
Van Horn, Elizabeth; Lewallen, Lynne Porter
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Zeta
Author Details:
Elizabeth Van Horn, PhD, RN, CNE, Professional Experience: I hold a PhD in nursing science, and have been a faculty member in nursing education programs for 12 years. I have been a co-investigator on a NLN-funded study in nursing education science on the topic of clinical evaluation. Author Summary: Dr. Van Horn is an Associate Professor and Faculty Excellence Coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro School of Nursing. She is a Certified Nurse Educator and has 12 years of experience as a nursing faculty in graduate and undergraduate programs. She has over 27 years of experience as a critical care nurse. She has published and presented on a variety of nursing education topics including clinical evaluation and innovative teaching strategies.
Abstract:

Purpose: This presentation will describe the state of the science on clinical evaluation of competence in nursing education and address issues related to instrumentation and methods used in clinical evaluation globally.

Methods: A NLN-funded research synthesis was conducted to identify published research and dissertations on clinical evaluation of nursing students. Cooper’s (2010) method of conducting a research synthesis was used to guide the study. Search methods included literature searches of nursing, educational, and health sciences databases; dissertation abstracts; review of table of contents of 7 leading nursing education journals from 2005-2015; and review of the reference lists of 6 review articles on clinical evaluation (e.g. Cant, McKenna, & Cooper, 2013). The full search resulted in 177 articles, of which 77 met the study criteria related to research on clinical evaluation of nursing students. From these, a total of 30 studies focused on clinical evaluation of competence, which was defined as the measurement or evaluation of competence in general or in a specific area. Data analyses included creation of a matrix for comparison of study data and narrative synthesis of study data.

Results: The 30 studies were published between the years 1988-2015 and used quantitative (n = 26), qualitative (n = 1), and mixed methods (n = 3). The studies were conducted in eight different countries including Australia, Finland, Ireland, Sweden, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the Unites States, providing information useful for evaluating diverse populations of students in various clinical settings including international venues.

The majority of the studies aimed to measure global competence at the end of a nursing program. Studies frequently measured student progress over time with pre and post-measures administered before and after an entire program, semester, clinical rotation, or specific event, such as a summer precepted experience. Seven studies focused on competence in a specific area including medication calculation (Macdonald, Weeks, & Mosely, 2013), vaccinations (Nikula, Puukka, & Leino-Kilpi, 2012), critical thinking (Pitt, Powis, Levett-Jones, & Hunter, 2015), psychiatric nursing skills (Glass & Ward, 2008), culturally specific care (Jeffreys & Dogan, 2013), and interpersonal communication (Klakovich & Cruz, 2006).

Most of the studies (n = 21) used researcher-developed instruments, and some also conducted psychometric testing of the study instrument (e.g. Hsu & Hsieh, 2013). Data for analyses included student-self reports (Kajander-Unkuri et al., 2014), faculty or preceptor evaluations of student performance (Cassidy et al., 2012). Many studies examined comparisons among these types of evaluations, while others compared either specific exam scores or grades in didactic courses with the clinical measures. A majority of the studies used descriptive, correlational, or comparative methods, and were classified as levels 4 or 6 according to Melnyk and Fineout-Overhalt’s (2011) levels of evidence.

Conclusion: Clinical evaluation in nursing education has been an ongoing area of educational research for decades and includes evaluation of competence in specific skills or nursing practice specialty areas, and in general competence. Despite the use of standardized licensing exams for entry into practice in many countries globally, a review of the research literature reveals clinical evaluation of competence lacks standardization of measures or methods, and a lack of replication of studies and instrument testing to build the science of nursing education related to evaluation of clinical competence. The common use of student self-evaluation and researcher-created measures is problematic for determining reliability and validity of instruments and comparison of findings across studies. The use of predominately descriptive research decreases the ability to use the research findings as evidence to guide nursing faculty in clinical evaluation methods. Imperative areas for future research and practice are the need to accurately and efficiently measure competence in the clinical area, the need for reliable and valid instruments, and the elevation of nursing research rigor in clinical evaluation of competence to include quasi-experimental and experimental research methods.

Keywords:
clinical evaluation; competence; nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17D15
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleState of the Science on Clinical Evaluation of Competence in Nursing Educationen_US
dc.title.alternativeClinical Competency Progressionen
dc.contributor.authorVan Horn, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorLewallen, Lynne Porteren
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Zetaen
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Van Horn, PhD, RN, CNE, Professional Experience: I hold a PhD in nursing science, and have been a faculty member in nursing education programs for 12 years. I have been a co-investigator on a NLN-funded study in nursing education science on the topic of clinical evaluation. Author Summary: Dr. Van Horn is an Associate Professor and Faculty Excellence Coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro School of Nursing. She is a Certified Nurse Educator and has 12 years of experience as a nursing faculty in graduate and undergraduate programs. She has over 27 years of experience as a critical care nurse. She has published and presented on a variety of nursing education topics including clinical evaluation and innovative teaching strategies.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622034-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>This presentation will describe the state of the science on clinical evaluation of competence in nursing education and address issues related to instrumentation and methods used in clinical evaluation globally.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A NLN-funded research synthesis was conducted to identify published research and dissertations on clinical evaluation of nursing students. Cooper’s (2010) method of conducting a research synthesis was used to guide the study. Search methods included literature searches of nursing, educational, and health sciences databases; dissertation abstracts; review of table of contents of 7 leading nursing education journals from 2005-2015; and review of the reference lists of 6 review articles on clinical evaluation (e.g. Cant, McKenna, & Cooper, 2013). The full search resulted in 177 articles, of which 77 met the study criteria related to research on clinical evaluation of nursing students. From these, a total of 30 studies focused on clinical evaluation of competence, which was defined as the measurement or evaluation of competence in general or in a specific area. Data analyses included creation of a matrix for comparison of study data and narrative synthesis of study data.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The 30 studies were published between the years 1988-2015 and used quantitative (n = 26), qualitative (n = 1), and mixed methods (n = 3). The studies were conducted in eight different countries including Australia, Finland, Ireland, Sweden, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the Unites States, providing information useful for evaluating diverse populations of students in various clinical settings including international venues.</p> <p>The majority of the studies aimed to measure global competence at the end of a nursing program. Studies frequently measured student progress over time with pre and post-measures administered before and after an entire program, semester, clinical rotation, or specific event, such as a summer precepted experience. Seven studies focused on competence in a specific area including medication calculation (Macdonald, Weeks, & Mosely, 2013), vaccinations (Nikula, Puukka, & Leino-Kilpi, 2012), critical thinking (Pitt, Powis, Levett-Jones, & Hunter, 2015), psychiatric nursing skills (Glass & Ward, 2008), culturally specific care (Jeffreys & Dogan, 2013), and interpersonal communication (Klakovich & Cruz, 2006).</p> <p>Most of the studies (n = 21) used researcher-developed instruments, and some also conducted psychometric testing of the study instrument (e.g. Hsu & Hsieh, 2013). Data for analyses included student-self reports (Kajander-Unkuri et al., 2014), faculty or preceptor evaluations of student performance (Cassidy et al., 2012). Many studies examined comparisons among these types of evaluations, while others compared either specific exam scores or grades in didactic courses with the clinical measures. A majority of the studies used descriptive, correlational, or comparative methods, and were classified as levels 4 or 6 according to Melnyk and Fineout-Overhalt’s (2011) levels of evidence.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Clinical evaluation in nursing education has been an ongoing area of educational research for decades and includes evaluation of competence in specific skills or nursing practice specialty areas, and in general competence. Despite the use of standardized licensing exams for entry into practice in many countries globally, a review of the research literature reveals clinical evaluation of competence lacks standardization of measures or methods, and a lack of replication of studies and instrument testing to build the science of nursing education related to evaluation of clinical competence. The common use of student self-evaluation and researcher-created measures is problematic for determining reliability and validity of instruments and comparison of findings across studies. The use of predominately descriptive research decreases the ability to use the research findings as evidence to guide nursing faculty in clinical evaluation methods. Imperative areas for future research and practice are the need to accurately and efficiently measure competence in the clinical area, the need for reliable and valid instruments, and the elevation of nursing research rigor in clinical evaluation of competence to include quasi-experimental and experimental research methods.</p>en
dc.subjectclinical evaluationen
dc.subjectcompetenceen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T20:37:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T20:37:15Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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