2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622036
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Experiences of Women With Physical Disabilities Related to Pregnancy
Other Titles:
Experiences of Pregnant Women
Author(s):
Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Mitra, Monika; Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Long-Bellil, Linda; Smith, Lauren D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Nu
Author Details:
Suzanne C. Smeltzer, EdD, MS, RN, ANEF, FAAN, Professional Experience: I have conducted research for over 25 years related to disability and educational preparation of health care professionals, including nursing, to provide quality care for individuals with disabilities. I have published and spoken widely about the importance of this topic as a significant health disparity that affects over 60 million people and about strategies to address it in health professions education. Project Director, Health Promotion for Women with Disabilities Project Professor and Director of the Center for Nursing Research at Villanova University College of Nursing Co-investigator on NIH grant to study perinatal health care issues of women with physical disabilities. Author Summary: The presenter has 30 years of experience as researcher and nurse educator teaching undergraduate, master’s and doctoral levels. The presenter has been examining health issues of women with disabilities, including pregnancy-related issues, since 1986.
Abstract:

Purpose:  The purpose of this IRB-approved study was to explore the pregnancy-related experiences of women with physical disabilities by obtaining their descriptions and perceptions of their experiences during the perinatal period as well as their recommendations for obstetric clinicians to improve perinatal care of women with physical disabilities. This study is significant because generations of women with disabilities have experienced barriers to health care, including in accessible offices, problematic interactions with health care providers and negative responses related to pregnancy and childbearing from health care professionals and others (Iezzoni, wint, Smeltzer & Ecker, 2015; Mitra, Long-Bellil, Smeltzer, & Iezzoni, 2015).

Methods:  This qualitative descriptive study (Colorafi & Evans, 2016), which is part of a larger mixed-method study of pregnancy-related experiences of women with physical disabilities, was conducted through telephone interview. Women with physical disabilities were recruited for the study through a variety of social media sites and contacts with community-based disability organizations. Thirty-one women responded to the invitation to participate. Following screening, 25 women who met the inclusion criteria of having delivered a newborn within the last 10 years, having a mobility limitation, and being between the ages of 21 and 55 at the time of the study were interviewed by phone.

Individual interviews were conducted by two members of the research team using a semi-structured interview guide based on literature, a preliminary focus group, and the results of the researchers’ previous research and experience working with women with disabilities. Among other topics related to perinatal experiences, women were asked about their interactions with obstetric clinicians (obstetricians, nurse midwives, nurse practitioners, nurses) during pregnancy; they were also asked for recommendations for clinicians about how to ensure positive perinatal experiences for women with physical disabilities. Traditional content analysis was used to analyze the transcriptions of the interviews. The transcriptions of the interviews were independently read by members of the research team to identify salient points. The research team then used those salient points to identify categories of concerns related to interaction with clinicians and recommendations related to those concerns made by women for the health care providers. The transcriptions were again reviewed to identify specific examples of their interactions and the recommendations provided by the women. Codes were continuously revised and final themes with supporting examples of women’s quotes were identified.

Results: The mean age of women in the study at the time their youngest child was born was 37.4 + 7.0. Fifteen women reported that their pregnancies were planned and ten reported unplanned pregnancies. Women reported diverse disabling conditions causing physical disability. Three themes emerged from analysis of the interview data: 1) clinicians’ lack of knowledge about pregnancy-related needs of women with physical disabilities; 2) clinicians’ failure to consider knowledge, experience and expertise of women about their own disability; and 3) clinicians’ overall lack of awareness of reproductive concerns of women with physical disabilities. Women provided specific recommendations related to each of these themes and warrant attention by clinicians who interact with women of childbearing years who live with physical disabilities.

Conclusion: Women experienced problematic interactions with clinicians related to pregnancy and childbearing. They identified specific recommendations for clinicians to address those problems with the goal of improving perinatal health care for women with disabilities. These recommendations, if followed have the potential to improve the health of women with disabilities during the perinatal period.

Keywords:
perinatal health care needs; pregnancy; Women with disabilities
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17R02
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleExperiences of Women With Physical Disabilities Related to Pregnancyen_US
dc.title.alternativeExperiences of Pregnant Womenen
dc.contributor.authorSmeltzer, Suzanne C.en
dc.contributor.authorMitra, Monikaen
dc.contributor.authorIezzoni, Lisa I.en
dc.contributor.authorLong-Bellil, Lindaen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Lauren D.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Nuen
dc.author.detailsSuzanne C. Smeltzer, EdD, MS, RN, ANEF, FAAN, Professional Experience: I have conducted research for over 25 years related to disability and educational preparation of health care professionals, including nursing, to provide quality care for individuals with disabilities. I have published and spoken widely about the importance of this topic as a significant health disparity that affects over 60 million people and about strategies to address it in health professions education. Project Director, Health Promotion for Women with Disabilities Project Professor and Director of the Center for Nursing Research at Villanova University College of Nursing Co-investigator on NIH grant to study perinatal health care issues of women with physical disabilities. Author Summary: The presenter has 30 years of experience as researcher and nurse educator teaching undergraduate, master’s and doctoral levels. The presenter has been examining health issues of women with disabilities, including pregnancy-related issues, since 1986.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622036-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span> The purpose of this IRB-approved study was to explore the pregnancy-related experiences of women with physical disabilities by obtaining their descriptions and perceptions of their experiences during the perinatal period as well as their recommendations for obstetric clinicians to improve perinatal care of women with physical disabilities. This study is significant because generations of women with disabilities have experienced barriers to health care, including in accessible offices, problematic interactions with health care providers and negative responses related to pregnancy and childbearing from health care professionals and others (Iezzoni, wint, Smeltzer & Ecker, 2015; Mitra, Long-Bellil, Smeltzer, & Iezzoni, 2015).</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> This qualitative descriptive study (Colorafi & Evans, 2016), which is part of a larger mixed-method study of pregnancy-related experiences of women with physical disabilities, was conducted through telephone interview. Women with physical disabilities were recruited for the study through a variety of social media sites and contacts with community-based disability organizations. Thirty-one women responded to the invitation to participate. Following screening, 25 women who met the inclusion criteria of having delivered a newborn within the last 10 years, having a mobility limitation, and being between the ages of 21 and 55 at the time of the study were interviewed by phone.</p> <p>Individual interviews were conducted by two members of the research team using a semi-structured interview guide based on literature, a preliminary focus group, and the results of the researchers’ previous research and experience working with women with disabilities. Among other topics related to perinatal experiences, women were asked about their interactions with obstetric clinicians (obstetricians, nurse midwives, nurse practitioners, nurses) during pregnancy; they were also asked for recommendations for clinicians about how to ensure positive perinatal experiences for women with physical disabilities. Traditional content analysis was used to analyze the transcriptions of the interviews. The transcriptions of the interviews were independently read by members of the research team to identify salient points. The research team then used those salient points to identify categories of concerns related to interaction with clinicians and recommendations related to those concerns made by women for the health care providers. The transcriptions were again reviewed to identify specific examples of their interactions and the recommendations provided by the women. Codes were continuously revised and final themes with supporting examples of women’s quotes were identified.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The mean age of women in the study at the time their youngest child was born was 37.4 + 7.0. Fifteen women reported that their pregnancies were planned and ten reported unplanned pregnancies. Women reported diverse disabling conditions causing physical disability. Three themes emerged from analysis of the interview data: 1) clinicians’ lack of knowledge about pregnancy-related needs of women with physical disabilities; 2) clinicians’ failure to consider knowledge, experience and expertise of women about their own disability; and 3) clinicians’ overall lack of awareness of reproductive concerns of women with physical disabilities. Women provided specific recommendations related to each of these themes and warrant attention by clinicians who interact with women of childbearing years who live with physical disabilities.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Women experienced problematic interactions with clinicians related to pregnancy and childbearing. They identified specific recommendations for clinicians to address those problems with the goal of improving perinatal health care for women with disabilities. These recommendations, if followed have the potential to improve the health of women with disabilities during the perinatal period.</p>en
dc.subjectperinatal health care needsen
dc.subjectpregnancyen
dc.subjectWomen with disabilitiesen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T20:45:11Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T20:45:11Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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