Perceived Strategies to Decrease Attrition Rates Among Nurses Practicing at Healthcare Institutions in India

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622042
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Perceived Strategies to Decrease Attrition Rates Among Nurses Practicing at Healthcare Institutions in India
Other Titles:
Global Retention
Author(s):
Prater, Llewellyn; Garner, Shelby L.; Raj, Leena
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Gamma
Author Details:
Llewellyn Prater, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have taught nursing at the baccalaureate level for 33 years and have been a member or STTI since I was a senior in college. I have 8 publications to my credit, have developed 2 international nursing electives for students Women's Health Care in Great Britain and Nursing and Health in Argentina; have presented my research at the STTI International Research Congresses in Brisbain, Australia, Dublin, Ireland, and will be presenting in Puerto Rico this summer. Author Summary: Dr. Lyn Prater is a Clinical Professor of Nursing at the Baylor University Louise Herrington School of Nursing where she teaches Foundations of Nursing Practice and Clinical Internship, and a Women and Children's Healthcare elective in Great Britain. Her focus on international work in India and Vietnam are dedicated to building nurse capacity.
Abstract:

Background: A profound nursing shortage exists in India, where nurses are increasingly out-migrating to practice nursing abroad. A robust nursing workforce is needed to improve health outcomes in India. Until recently, nursing was not considered a profession in India and research suggests nurses historically experienced marginalization and oppression (Johnson, Green, & Maben, 2014). A recent positive shift in the perception of nurses as professionals in India creates a timely milieu in which to give nurses a voice so that they may express their ideas and perceptions (Walton-Roberts, 2015). Strategies to decrease attrition rates among nurses in India could also shape health policy in other countries that may be facing similar shortages.

Purpose:  To explore a subset of nurses’ perceived strategies to decrease attrition rates among nurses practicing at healthcare institutions in India.

Methods:  A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Purposive sampling resulted in 10 participants. First, participants were asked to complete a short written questionnaire to provide information on socio demographics and nursing experience. Participants were then interviewed using face-to-face semi structured, in depth, individual interviews. The interviews started with open-ended questions related to each participant’s lived experience as a nurse in India and moved into open-ended questions to solicit their ideas on strategies to decrease attrition rates among nurses in India. Data were collected from November 2014 to March 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. A directed content analysis approach was used to derive codes, themes, and subthemes.

Results:  Coding and thematic interpretation resulted in three themes and multiple subthemes. Perceived strategies to decrease attrition rates included the need to: 1) implement reasonable remuneration through establishing equitable and aligned salary scales, 2) provide safe and effective environments by standardizing nursing workforce policies, ensuring equipment availability, and offering transportation services for nurses, and 3) recognize nursing as a profession by offering increased opportunities for nurses to become leaders and providing opportunities to recognize the value of nurses in the healthcare workforce.

Conclusion: Participants in this study advocated for change in nursing and workforce policy to start from within the nursing profession towards positive practice environments to increase nursing capacity in India and globally.

Keywords:
India; Nurse attrition rates; nurse migration
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17N07
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePerceived Strategies to Decrease Attrition Rates Among Nurses Practicing at Healthcare Institutions in Indiaen_US
dc.title.alternativeGlobal Retentionen
dc.contributor.authorPrater, Llewellynen
dc.contributor.authorGarner, Shelby L.en
dc.contributor.authorRaj, Leenaen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Gammaen
dc.author.detailsLlewellyn Prater, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have taught nursing at the baccalaureate level for 33 years and have been a member or STTI since I was a senior in college. I have 8 publications to my credit, have developed 2 international nursing electives for students Women's Health Care in Great Britain and Nursing and Health in Argentina; have presented my research at the STTI International Research Congresses in Brisbain, Australia, Dublin, Ireland, and will be presenting in Puerto Rico this summer. Author Summary: Dr. Lyn Prater is a Clinical Professor of Nursing at the Baylor University Louise Herrington School of Nursing where she teaches Foundations of Nursing Practice and Clinical Internship, and a Women and Children's Healthcare elective in Great Britain. Her focus on international work in India and Vietnam are dedicated to building nurse capacity.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622042-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong><span>A profound nursing shortage exists in India, where nurses are increasingly out-migrating to practice nursing abroad. A robust nursing workforce is needed to improve health outcomes in India. Until recently, nursing was not considered a profession in India and research suggests nurses historically experienced marginalization and oppression (Johnson, Green, & Maben, 2014). A recent positive shift in the perception of nurses as professionals in India creates a timely milieu in which to give nurses a voice so that they may express their ideas and perceptions (Walton-Roberts, 2015). Strategies to decrease attrition rates among nurses in India could also shape health policy in other countries that may be facing similar shortages.</span></p> <p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong> </strong>To explore a subset of nurses’ perceived strategies to decrease attrition rates among nurses practicing at healthcare institutions in India.</p> <p><strong><strong>Methods: </strong> </strong>A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Purposive sampling resulted in 10 participants. First, participants were asked to complete a short written questionnaire to provide information on socio demographics and nursing experience. Participants were then interviewed using face-to-face semi structured, in depth, individual interviews. The interviews started with open-ended questions related to each participant’s lived experience as a nurse in India and moved into open-ended questions to solicit their ideas on strategies to decrease attrition rates among nurses in India. Data were collected from November 2014 to March 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. A directed content analysis approach was used to derive codes, themes, and subthemes.</p> <p><strong><strong>Results: </strong> </strong>Coding and thematic interpretation resulted in three themes and multiple subthemes. Perceived strategies to decrease attrition rates included the need to: 1) implement reasonable remuneration through establishing equitable and aligned salary scales, 2) provide safe and effective environments by standardizing nursing workforce policies, ensuring equipment availability, and offering transportation services for nurses, and 3) recognize nursing as a profession by offering increased opportunities for nurses to become leaders and providing opportunities to recognize the value of nurses in the healthcare workforce.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Participants in this study advocated for change in nursing and workforce policy to start from within the nursing profession towards positive practice environments to increase nursing capacity in India and globally.</p>en
dc.subjectIndiaen
dc.subjectNurse attrition ratesen
dc.subjectnurse migrationen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T21:28:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T21:28:49Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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