Determining the Level of Engagement in the Ohio State University Wellness Innovator Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622045
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Determining the Level of Engagement in the Ohio State University Wellness Innovator Program
Author(s):
Amaya, Megan E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Megan E. Amaya, PhD, CHES, AFAA, Professional Experience: Health promotion practitioner in both public and private settings; currently manages large-scale organizational health promotion programs for The Ohio State University College of Nursing and The OSU Wexner Medical Center. Author Summary: Megan Amaya, PhD, is the Director of Health Promotion and Wellness and Assistant Professor in Practice at the College of Nursing at The Ohio State University. Megan currently serves as President-Elect for the National Consortium for Building Healthy Academic Communities, Past-President for the Society of Public Health Educators Ohio Chapter, and steering team member for the central region Healthy Ohio Business Council. She is a certified health education specialist among other health training certifications.
Abstract:

Background: A wellness champion team is an essential component of a worksite wellness program initiative. The role of the wellness champion team is to communicate, participate in, motivate colleagues, and support the worksite wellness program. Champions are often the “voice of the employee” for wellness offering considerations. However, very little is known about the impact and level of participant engagement of these teams. Developed 4 years ago under the direction of the University Chief Wellness Officer, the wellness team at a large academic institution in the United States includes 500 faculty/staff members who are Wellness Innovators from across the university. Methods: A pre-experimental, cross-sectional study design to study multiple variables in a single point in time. An anonymous 9-item survey was developed and administered to all participants in the Wellness Innovator program. Items were created based upon an extensive review of the literature. Analysis: Means of continuous variables (e.g., age) will be compared across groups using two-sample t-tests (engaged vs. less engaged Wellness Innovators). Chi-squared tests will be used to compare distributions of categorical variables (e.g., gender) across groups. If differences in demographics across groups are found, then linear and logistic regression models will be used to test for differences in manager support across the groups to control for demographic differences by including them as covariates in the models. Results: Survey items include questions about engagement and support of Wellness Innovators in their current role. To provide consistency, definitions of these terms are provided in the survey. Demographic information on participants will be presented, as well as current level of engagement in the program and perceived manager/supervisor support for their role in the program. Data will be presented on the following two research questions: 1) are there demographic differences among Wellness Innovators that are engaged and less engaged within the Wellness Innovator program? and 2) are there perceived differences in direct manager support among Wellness Innovators that are engaged and less engaged within the Wellness Innovator program? Conclusion: Measuring level of engagement of a worksite wellness team is vital to the longevity and support of the program. Although many worksite wellness programs employ wellness champion teams, the field as a whole has little understanding of how level of engagement and manager/supervisor support can influence the champion’s decision to remain committed to the wellness program. Implications exist for not only a worksite wellness program but for other environments where wellness champion teams exist, such as community health promotion efforts, medical centers, and patient advocacy populations.

Keywords:
champion; engagement; Wellness
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST302
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleDetermining the Level of Engagement in the Ohio State University Wellness Innovator Programen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmaya, Megan E.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMegan E. Amaya, PhD, CHES, AFAA, Professional Experience: Health promotion practitioner in both public and private settings; currently manages large-scale organizational health promotion programs for The Ohio State University College of Nursing and The OSU Wexner Medical Center. Author Summary: Megan Amaya, PhD, is the Director of Health Promotion and Wellness and Assistant Professor in Practice at the College of Nursing at The Ohio State University. Megan currently serves as President-Elect for the National Consortium for Building Healthy Academic Communities, Past-President for the Society of Public Health Educators Ohio Chapter, and steering team member for the central region Healthy Ohio Business Council. She is a certified health education specialist among other health training certifications.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622045-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background</strong><span>: A wellness champion team is an essential component of a worksite wellness program initiative. The role of the wellness champion team is to communicate, participate in, motivate colleagues, and support the worksite wellness program. Champions are often the “voice of the employee” for wellness offering considerations. However, very little is known about the impact and level of participant engagement of these teams. Developed 4 years ago under the direction of the University Chief Wellness Officer, the wellness team at a large academic institution in the United States includes 500 faculty/staff members who are Wellness Innovators from across the university. </span><strong>Methods</strong><span>: A pre-experimental, cross-sectional study design to study multiple variables in a single point in time. An anonymous 9-item survey was developed and administered to all participants in the Wellness Innovator program. Items were created based upon an extensive review of the literature. </span><strong>Analysis:</strong><span> Means of continuous variables (e.g., age) will be compared across groups using two-sample t-tests (engaged vs. less engaged Wellness Innovators). Chi-squared tests will be used to compare distributions of categorical variables (e.g., gender) across groups. If differences in demographics across groups are found, then linear and logistic regression models will be used to test for differences in manager support across the groups to control for demographic differences by including them as covariates in the models. </span><strong>Results</strong><span>: Survey items include questions about engagement and support of Wellness Innovators in their current role. To provide consistency, definitions of these terms are provided in the survey. Demographic information on participants will be presented, as well as current level of engagement in the program and perceived manager/supervisor support for their role in the program. Data will be presented on the following two research questions: 1) are there demographic differences among Wellness Innovators that are engaged and less engaged within the Wellness Innovator program? and 2) are there perceived differences in direct manager support among Wellness Innovators that are engaged and less engaged within the Wellness Innovator program? </span><strong>Conclusion</strong><span>: Measuring level of engagement of a worksite wellness team is vital to the longevity and support of the program. Although many worksite wellness programs employ wellness champion teams, the field as a whole has little understanding of how level of engagement and manager/supervisor support can influence the champion’s decision to remain committed to the wellness program. Implications exist for not only a worksite wellness program but for other environments where wellness champion teams exist, such as community health promotion efforts, medical centers, and patient advocacy populations.</span></p>en
dc.subjectchampionen
dc.subjectengagementen
dc.subjectWellnessen
dc.date.available2017-07-21T21:53:35Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T21:53:35Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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