2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622048
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Right Time in Medication Administration: A Multifaceted Concept
Author(s):
Brixey, Juliana J.; Erdley, William Scott
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Pi
Author Details:
Juliana J. Brixey, PhD, MPH, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: In 2006 after completing a PhD in Health Informatics from the School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, joined the faculty at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. . During her doctoral studies she was involved in a number funded patient safety research studies. The funded studies involved redesigning the interface for an infusion pump, developing a taxonomy of medical errors, understanding how organizations make decisions to purchase medical devices such as infusion pumps and developing an ontology to record and classify healthcare errors and near error conditions. In 2010, accepted a faculty position at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics. In September 2013, began a joint appointment with UT SON. Author Summary: Juliana J. Brixey, PhD, MPH, RN, is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. She holds a joint appoint with the School of Biomedical Informatics and School of Nursing. Her faculty position entails teaching biomedical and nursing informatics courses. Brixey is Director for the UTHealth Center for Interprofessional Collaboration. She has delivered numerous podium and poster presentations both nationally and internationally.
Abstract:

Purpose: The medication administration process is a five-step procedure entailing prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, administering, and monitoring. Medication administration involves giving a pharmacological agent, such as a drug, to a patient or client. Within medication administration the patient expects the right medication, in the right dose, to be at the right time, and by the right route. ‘Right time’, which is clearly identified as an important component of the medication administration process, should therefore be clearly defined as well achievable. ‘Right time’ also implies a measurable period of time. The literature does not clearly define ‘right time’ instead defining through linking to, for example, a prescribing provider’s order or the most recent administration. The purpose of this study was to review the literature to determine themes, trends, and definitions of ‘right time’ of medication administration.

Methods: A retrospective review of the literature was conducted to identify themes and trends of ‘right time’ of medication administration.

Results: A specific definition of ‘right time’ was not readily discovered in the literature. The following trends were identified from the literature. For example, ‘right time’ is coupled with an exact time such as an hour for administration (e.g., at 0600). Moreover, ‘right time’ is intimately related to frequency. For example, twice a day at 0900 and 1700. ‘Right time’ may also be coupled with a range in hours. For instance, every two hours or every six hours. What is more, ‘Right time’ can be extended to a seasonal event. For example, the ‘right time’ to receive the flu vaccine during the flu season. Right time is teamed with vital signs. For example, administer acetaminophen every 6 hours as needed for temperature greater than 100 degree F. ‘Right time’ is also coupled with laboratory values. Administer Warfarin 5 mg for INR < 1.5. Additionally ‘right time’ is frequently denoted with a specific parameter such as with food or without food. These attributes should ultimately be based on drug action, distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion.

Conclusion:  A definition for ‘right time’ medication administration needs to be explicitly stated. This research study indicates ‘right time’ is a multifaceted concept without a clear and precise definition. This research begins development of a taxonomy of ‘right time’ drug administration.

Keywords:
medication administration; right time; taxonomy
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST72
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleRight Time in Medication Administration: A Multifaceted Concepten_US
dc.contributor.authorBrixey, Juliana J.en
dc.contributor.authorErdley, William Scotten
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Pien
dc.author.detailsJuliana J. Brixey, PhD, MPH, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: In 2006 after completing a PhD in Health Informatics from the School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, joined the faculty at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. . During her doctoral studies she was involved in a number funded patient safety research studies. The funded studies involved redesigning the interface for an infusion pump, developing a taxonomy of medical errors, understanding how organizations make decisions to purchase medical devices such as infusion pumps and developing an ontology to record and classify healthcare errors and near error conditions. In 2010, accepted a faculty position at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics. In September 2013, began a joint appointment with UT SON. Author Summary: Juliana J. Brixey, PhD, MPH, RN, is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. She holds a joint appoint with the School of Biomedical Informatics and School of Nursing. Her faculty position entails teaching biomedical and nursing informatics courses. Brixey is Director for the UTHealth Center for Interprofessional Collaboration. She has delivered numerous podium and poster presentations both nationally and internationally.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622048-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The medication administration process is a five-step procedure entailing prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, administering, and monitoring. Medication administration involves giving a pharmacological agent, such as a drug, to a patient or client. Within medication administration the patient expects the right medication, in the right dose, to be at the right time, and by the right route. ‘Right time’, which is clearly identified as an important component of the medication administration process, should therefore be clearly defined as well achievable. ‘Right time’ also implies a measurable period of time. The literature does not clearly define ‘right time’ instead defining through linking to, for example, a prescribing provider’s order or the most recent administration. The purpose of this study was to review the literature to determine themes, trends, and definitions of ‘right time’ of medication administration.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A retrospective review of the literature was conducted to identify themes and trends of ‘right time’ of medication administration.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>A specific definition of ‘right time’ was not readily discovered in the literature. The following trends were identified from the literature. For example, ‘right time’ is coupled with an exact time such as an hour for administration (e.g., at 0600). Moreover, ‘right time’ is intimately related to frequency. For example, twice a day at 0900 and 1700. ‘Right time’ may also be coupled with a range in hours. For instance, every two hours or every six hours. What is more, ‘Right time’ can be extended to a seasonal event. For example, the ‘right time’ to receive the flu vaccine during the flu season. Right time is teamed with vital signs. For example, administer acetaminophen every 6 hours as needed for temperature greater than 100 degree F. ‘Right time’ is also coupled with laboratory values. Administer Warfarin 5 mg for INR < 1.5. Additionally ‘right time’ is frequently denoted with a specific parameter such as with food or without food. These attributes should ultimately be based on drug action, distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> A definition for ‘right time’ medication administration needs to be explicitly stated. This research study indicates ‘right time’ is a multifaceted concept without a clear and precise definition. This research begins development of a taxonomy of ‘right time’ drug administration.</p>en
dc.subjectmedication administrationen
dc.subjectright timeen
dc.subjecttaxonomyen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T12:53:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T12:53:32Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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