Impressions of Uses for Visual Thinking Strategies Among Doctorate of Nursing Practice Leadership Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622075
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Impressions of Uses for Visual Thinking Strategies Among Doctorate of Nursing Practice Leadership Students
Other Titles:
Doctoral Nursing Education
Author(s):
Moorman, Meg; Hensel, Desiree
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Meg Moorman, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, Professional Experience: Assistant Clinical Professor Indiana University 2007-present Women's Health NP for Methodist Medical Group 1996-2010 RN for Zionsville OB/GYN 1990-1996 Staff Nurse Labor and Delivery Methodist Hospital 1988-1996 Author Summary: Meg Moorman is a clinical assistant professor at Indiana University School of Nursing and coordinator of the MSN in Nursing Education Program. Her research is based on the use of Visual Thinking Strategies and art in nursing education. She has presented her work at both the national and international levels. She teaches undergraduate and graduate students on the Indianapolis campus and is currently a Mosaic Fellow at IU.
Abstract:

Purpose:  Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a structured art viewing technique that can help students develop aesthetic understanding and critical thinking skills (Housen, 2002). VTS integrates many techniques to build cognition including fact-finding, questioning, speculating, and personal association (Yenawine, 1997). Originally used with children, there is now a growing recognition that VTS holds value in higher education (Moorman, & Hensel, 2016). In the field of Nursing, undergraduate students have reported that VTS helps create a safe learning environment and helps the see things differently. (Moorman, 2015). Other undergraduate students have reported that VTS helped them gain observational, cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal skills (Moorman, Hensel, Decker, & Busby, 2016). Very little is known about how VTS might be used among nurses in leadership and administrative positions. The purpose of this project was to explore perceptions of how nurses enrolled in a Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) program thought they might use VTS in their practice.

Methods:  Fourteen DNP students, enrolled in a leadership DNP, participated in a standard VTS session lead by a trained facilitator. The group viewed three works of art and then were asked three open ended questions: 1. What is going on in this picture? 2. What are you seeing that makes you say that? and 3. What more can you find? Following the session the participants provided written feedback to open ended questions: 1.What was your impression of Visual Thinking Strategies?and 2. How might you use Visual Thinking Strategies in your Nursing or leadership?All participants gave written consent to use de-identified data for research purposes. Data were analyzed using the qualitative descriptive approach described by Sandelowski (2000) with Dedoose Version 7.5 software.

Results:  The VTS session was well received as being enjoyable and having applications for practice. Three themes emerged about how participants might use VTS: as a teaching tool (N=13), changing thinking in practice (N=7), and facilitating interpersonal relations (N=14).

Conclusion:  Thinking “out of the box” is becoming increasingly important for nurses to deal with complexity in today’s health care health care environment. This study found DNP students felt VTS could be used as a tool to improve communication and critical thinking in practice and education. Future research should address how skills learned in VTS improve nursing practice.

Keywords:
nursing education; innovative teaching strategies; leadership
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17C16
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleImpressions of Uses for Visual Thinking Strategies Among Doctorate of Nursing Practice Leadership Studentsen_US
dc.title.alternativeDoctoral Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorMoorman, Megen
dc.contributor.authorHensel, Desireeen
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsMeg Moorman, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, Professional Experience: Assistant Clinical Professor Indiana University 2007-present Women's Health NP for Methodist Medical Group 1996-2010 RN for Zionsville OB/GYN 1990-1996 Staff Nurse Labor and Delivery Methodist Hospital 1988-1996 Author Summary: Meg Moorman is a clinical assistant professor at Indiana University School of Nursing and coordinator of the MSN in Nursing Education Program. Her research is based on the use of Visual Thinking Strategies and art in nursing education. She has presented her work at both the national and international levels. She teaches undergraduate and graduate students on the Indianapolis campus and is currently a Mosaic Fellow at IU.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622075-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) is a structured art viewing technique that can help students develop aesthetic understanding and critical thinking skills (Housen, 2002). VTS integrates many techniques to build cognition including fact-finding, questioning, speculating, and personal association (Yenawine, 1997). Originally used with children, there is now a growing recognition that VTS holds value in higher education (Moorman, & Hensel, 2016). In the field of Nursing, undergraduate students have reported that VTS helps create a safe learning environment and helps the see things differently. (Moorman, 2015). Other undergraduate students have reported that VTS helped them gain observational, cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal skills (Moorman, Hensel, Decker, & Busby, 2016). Very little is known about how VTS might be used among nurses in leadership and administrative positions. The purpose of this project was to explore perceptions of how nurses enrolled in a Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) program thought they might use VTS in their practice.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> Fourteen DNP students, enrolled in a leadership DNP, participated in a standard VTS session lead by a trained facilitator. The group viewed three works of art and then were asked three open ended questions<em>: 1. What is going on in this picture? 2. What are you seeing that makes you say that? </em>and <em>3. What more can you find?</em> Following the session the participants provided written feedback to open ended questions: 1<em>.What was your impression of Visual Thinking Strategies?</em>and<em> 2. How might you use Visual Thinking Strategies in your Nursing or leadership?</em>All participants gave written consent to use de-identified data for research purposes. Data were analyzed using the qualitative descriptive approach described by Sandelowski (2000) with Dedoose Version 7.5 software.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> The VTS session was well received as being enjoyable and having applications for practice. Three themes emerged about how participants might use VTS: as a teaching tool (N=13), changing thinking in practice (N=7), and facilitating interpersonal relations (N=14).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> Thinking “out of the box” is becoming increasingly important for nurses to deal with complexity in today’s health care health care environment. This study found DNP students felt VTS could be used as a tool to improve communication and critical thinking in practice and education. Future research should address how skills learned in VTS improve nursing practice.</p>en
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.subjectinnovative teaching strategiesen
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T17:58:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T17:58:46Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.