2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622076
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
An Integrated Model of Learning and Role Development in Nursing Education
Other Titles:
Defining the Nurse Faculty Role
Author(s):
Schuler, Monika
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Kappa
Author Details:
Monika Schuler, PhD, RN, CNE, Professional Experience: 2016 – Current – Assistant Professor, UMASS Dartmouth College of Nursing, North Dartmouth, MA 2014- 2016: Full Time Lecturer, UMASS Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 2011-2014 -- Assistant Professor, Laboure College, Milton, MA 2013 - Part Time Lecturer, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 2009 - 2011 -- Clinical Instructor, UMASS-Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 2014-2016 - President, Sigma Theta Kappa Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International I am a second degree nurse having come into nursing after many years as a cranberry biologist. My experience in nursing education both as a student and faculty member in addition to my experience in practice has stimulated a strong interest in role development. Author Summary: Dr. Schuler has a diverse and unconventional background and experience base. Having begun her career as a cranberry biologist Dr. Schuler was inspired to change direction into healthcare after a volunteer experience in Far East Russia. Her research interests are in nursing education with a particular focus on role development and transition to practice. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth.
Abstract:

Purpose:

With a view towards understanding how students develop new knowledge and practices that facilitate role development in the clinical and simulation settings, the purpose of this project was to examine the process by which new knowledge is absorbed and processed leading to perspective transformations and ultimately role development.

In considering how students learn, constructivist pedagogy involves active learning where students have an opportunity to challenge previous thoughts on content and try out different aspects of their future role with guidance (Handwerker, 2012). This active learning helps a student develop metacognition and an ability to transfer knowledge and skills to new situations ultimately resulting in the development of clinical reasoning and a sense of relevance. The clinical and simulation environment is an ideal place for active learning. Recent work by Arreciado Maranon and Ilsa Pera (2015) reinforce the value of clinical education in forming student identities particularly as they are given an opportunity to examine this education in light of what was learned in the classroom. Students often come into clinical experiences with preconceived notions of what they will see and do, though there are numerous occasions when something unexpected occurs (Palese, Petean, & Cerne, 2013). Furthermore, many nursing students experience an incongruity between what they are taught in the classroom and what they experience in the practice settings (Chappy, Jambunathan, & Marnocha, 2010). Understanding how students process, reconcile, and learn from what is studied in the classroom compared to what is experienced in the clinical setting and how this facilitates learning and role development was examined.

 Methods:

 Influenced by Mezirow’s (1978) Transformative Learning Theory, Tanner’s (2006) Clinical Judgement Model , and Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, and Day’s (2010) landmark work on Educating Nursesa constructivist approach was adapted in the development of a new model for describing the process of learning and role development in the clinical and simulation setting. This approach involved reviewing the literature, re-analyzing themes, development of multiple schematics, continual review, personal observations of students in the clinical and simulation settings, and feedback from peer educators. The resulting Reflection, Feedback, and Restructuring Model was developed.

Results:

 The Reflection, Feedback, and Restructuring Model describes an inductive, iterative process strongly influenced by feedback. The first component of the model depicts a new experience encountered by the student. The second component focuses on the student’s reflection of the event where an attempt is made to interpret the event in the context of what is known or has been learned in the classroom. Within this reflection component is an inductive response in terms of identification of gaps in knowledge (if any) and formulating a plan for responding should this event occur again. The next step in the process draws on the literature related to the value of formative feedback which has been described as an essential component of student learning and improves performance and skills, motivation, personal development, and confidence (Koharchik, 2016; Motley & Dolansky, 2015; Plakht, Shiyovich, Nusbaum, & Raizer, 2013). The final step in the process of student learning and role development involves restructuring. In this phase, the student responds to the feedback and adopts a new perspective of what is appropriate given what was experienced. The student may recognize he or she may need to restructure preconceived notions or ways of doing things. Finally the student emerges with a new sense of what is normal and expected nursing actions. This new normal serves as foundation for future nursing action and role development.

Conclusion:

A key component of nursing education is the integration of knowledge and practice for the development of critical thinking skills that inform subsequent action in the practice setting when providing patient care. For many students, a component of the learning involves reformulating and re-conceptualizing what is learned in the classroom with what is seen and experienced in the clinical setting. The model was used as a conceptual framework to guide the development of reflective questions used by Schuler (2016) examining professional role conceptions following a shadowing experience. The Reflection, Feedback, and Restructuring conceptual model may be a useful tool to guide nurse educators facilitating the transition from the classroom to the clinical setting and facilitating knowledge and role development for the nursing student.

Keywords:
model; nursing education; role development
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17C17
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleAn Integrated Model of Learning and Role Development in Nursing Educationen_US
dc.title.alternativeDefining the Nurse Faculty Roleen
dc.contributor.authorSchuler, Monikaen
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Kappaen
dc.author.detailsMonika Schuler, PhD, RN, CNE, Professional Experience: 2016 – Current – Assistant Professor, UMASS Dartmouth College of Nursing, North Dartmouth, MA 2014- 2016: Full Time Lecturer, UMASS Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 2011-2014 -- Assistant Professor, Laboure College, Milton, MA 2013 - Part Time Lecturer, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 2009 - 2011 -- Clinical Instructor, UMASS-Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 2014-2016 - President, Sigma Theta Kappa Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International I am a second degree nurse having come into nursing after many years as a cranberry biologist. My experience in nursing education both as a student and faculty member in addition to my experience in practice has stimulated a strong interest in role development. Author Summary: Dr. Schuler has a diverse and unconventional background and experience base. Having begun her career as a cranberry biologist Dr. Schuler was inspired to change direction into healthcare after a volunteer experience in Far East Russia. Her research interests are in nursing education with a particular focus on role development and transition to practice. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622076-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>With a view towards understanding how students develop new knowledge and practices that facilitate role development in the clinical and simulation settings, the purpose of this project was to examine the process by which new knowledge is absorbed and processed leading to perspective transformations and ultimately role development.</p> <p>In considering how students learn, constructivist pedagogy involves active learning where students have an opportunity to challenge previous thoughts on content and try out different aspects of their future role with guidance (Handwerker, 2012). This active learning helps a student develop metacognition and an ability to transfer knowledge and skills to new situations ultimately resulting in the development of clinical reasoning and a sense of relevance. The clinical and simulation environment is an ideal place for active learning. Recent work by Arreciado Maranon and Ilsa Pera (2015) reinforce the value of clinical education in forming student identities particularly as they are given an opportunity to examine this education in light of what was learned in the classroom. Students often come into clinical experiences with preconceived notions of what they will see and do, though there are numerous occasions when something unexpected occurs (Palese, Petean, & Cerne, 2013). Furthermore, many nursing students experience an incongruity between what they are taught in the classroom and what they experience in the practice settings (Chappy, Jambunathan, & Marnocha, 2010). Understanding how students process, reconcile, and learn from what is studied in the classroom compared to what is experienced in the clinical setting and how this facilitates learning and role development was examined.</p> <p> <strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p> Influenced by Mezirow’s (1978) Transformative Learning Theory, Tanner’s (2006) Clinical Judgement Model , and Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, and Day’s (2010) landmark work on <em>Educating Nurses</em>a constructivist approach was adapted in the development of a new model for describing the process of learning and role development in the clinical and simulation setting. This approach involved reviewing the literature, re-analyzing themes, development of multiple schematics, continual review, personal observations of students in the clinical and simulation settings, and feedback from peer educators. The resulting Reflection, Feedback, and Restructuring Model was developed.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p> The Reflection, Feedback, and Restructuring Model describes an inductive, iterative process strongly influenced by feedback. The first component of the model depicts a new experience encountered by the student. The second component focuses on the student’s reflection of the event where an attempt is made to interpret the event in the context of what is known or has been learned in the classroom. Within this reflection component is an inductive response in terms of identification of gaps in knowledge (if any) and formulating a plan for responding should this event occur again. The next step in the process draws on the literature related to the value of formative feedback which has been described as an essential component of student learning and improves performance and skills, motivation, personal development, and confidence (Koharchik, 2016; Motley & Dolansky, 2015; Plakht, Shiyovich, Nusbaum, & Raizer, 2013). The final step in the process of student learning and role development involves restructuring. In this phase, the student responds to the feedback and adopts a new perspective of what is appropriate given what was experienced. The student may recognize he or she may need to restructure preconceived notions or ways of doing things. Finally the student emerges with a new sense of what is normal and expected nursing actions. This new normal serves as foundation for future nursing action and role development.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>A key component of nursing education is the integration of knowledge and practice for the development of critical thinking skills that inform subsequent action in the practice setting when providing patient care. For many students, a component of the learning involves reformulating and re-conceptualizing what is learned in the classroom with what is seen and experienced in the clinical setting. The model was used as a conceptual framework to guide the development of reflective questions used by Schuler (2016) examining professional role conceptions following a shadowing experience. The Reflection, Feedback, and Restructuring conceptual model may be a useful tool to guide nurse educators facilitating the transition from the classroom to the clinical setting and facilitating knowledge and role development for the nursing student.</p>en
dc.subjectmodelen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.subjectrole developmenten
dc.date.available2017-07-24T18:21:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T18:21:15Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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