Simulation Pre-Briefing: Supporting Competency and Judgment Development in Nursing Learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622077
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Simulation Pre-Briefing: Supporting Competency and Judgment Development in Nursing Learning
Other Titles:
Transforming Nursing Knowledge, Education, and Practice Through Pre-Briefing and Debriefing [Symposium]
Author(s):
Page-Cutrara, Karin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Karin Page-Cutrara, PhD, RN, CCNE, School of Nursing, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this experimental study was to describe a newly developed model-based, structured prebriefing intervention and its effect on nursing students’ competency performance, clinical judgment, and their perceived prebriefing experience, and to describe its application to teaching practice. Prebriefing begins the simulation process and introduces the participants to the simulation, learning experience (Chamberlain, 2015; Rudolph, Raemer, & Simon, 2014). However, little nursing education research is available on this activity, and how it relates to the development of nursing knowledge and practice. Reflection theory and concept mapping underpinned the development of a model on which this intervention was based, to prepare students for meaningful simulation learning (Decker et al., 2010; author, 2014).

Methods:  An experimental group-randomized design was used to compare the intervention group, which received structured prebriefing and the control group, which received customary orientation activities. This study was conducted at a university school of nursing in Canada. Baccalaureate nursing students (N = 76) in a traditional four-year program, who were enrolled in a fourth-year medical-surgical course, participated. Competency performance, clinical judgment, and the perceptions of the prebriefing experiences in each group were examined, in addition to the relationship between simulation performance and students' self-rated prebriefing experience. Scores from the Creighton Competency Evaluation Instrument and the Prebriefing Experience Scale were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistics.

Results: A statistically significant difference was demonstrated between groups for competency performance (p < 0.001), clinical judgment (p < 0.001) and prebriefing experience (p < 0.001). No relationship was found between students’ self-perceptions of prebriefing experience and the researcher-rated simulation performance.

Conclusion: Theory-based, structured prebriefing can impact nursing student competency performance, clinical judgment and perceptions of prebriefing, and may enhance meaningful simulation learning. A detailed description of the model-based prebriefing intervention worksheet will be provided, and an interactive discussion of possibilities for its use in varied academic and clinical settings, with global applications, will be facilitated. Prebriefing, as the first phase of simulation, has implications for transforming nursing knowledge, education and practice throughout the entire simulation process, and beyond.

Keywords:
Nursing knowledge and practice; Prebriefing; Simulation learning
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship
Note:
One combined slide deck was submitted for all presentations in the symposium. This slide deck will be attached to other records in the repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleSimulation Pre-Briefing: Supporting Competency and Judgment Development in Nursing Learningen_US
dc.title.alternativeTransforming Nursing Knowledge, Education, and Practice Through Pre-Briefing and Debriefing [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorPage-Cutrara, Karinen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsKarin Page-Cutrara, PhD, RN, CCNE, School of Nursing, York University, Toronto, ON, Canadaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622077-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The purpose of this experimental study was to describe a newly developed model-based, structured prebriefing intervention and its effect on nursing students’ competency performance, clinical judgment, and their perceived prebriefing experience, and to describe its application to teaching practice. Prebriefing begins the simulation process and introduces the participants to the simulation, learning experience (Chamberlain, 2015; Rudolph, Raemer, & Simon, 2014). However, little nursing education research is available on this activity, and how it relates to the development of nursing knowledge and practice. Reflection theory and concept mapping underpinned the development of a model on which this intervention was based, to prepare students for meaningful simulation learning (Decker et al., 2010; author, 2014).</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> An experimental group-randomized design was used to compare the intervention group, which received structured prebriefing and the control group, which received customary orientation activities. This study was conducted at a university school of nursing in Canada. Baccalaureate nursing students (N = 76) in a traditional four-year program, who were enrolled in a fourth-year medical-surgical course, participated. Competency performance, clinical judgment, and the perceptions of the prebriefing experiences in each group were examined, in addition to the relationship between simulation performance and students' self-rated prebriefing experience. Scores from the <em>Creighton Competency Evaluation Instrument</em> and the <em>Prebriefing Experience Scale</em> were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistics.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>A statistically significant difference was demonstrated between groups for competency performance (p < 0.001), clinical judgment (p < 0.001) and prebriefing experience (p < 0.001). No relationship was found between students’ self-perceptions of prebriefing experience and the researcher-rated simulation performance.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Theory-based, structured prebriefing can impact nursing student competency performance, clinical judgment and perceptions of prebriefing, and may enhance meaningful simulation learning. A detailed description of the model-based prebriefing intervention worksheet will be provided, and an interactive discussion of possibilities for its use in varied academic and clinical settings, with global applications, will be facilitated. Prebriefing, as the first phase of simulation, has implications for transforming nursing knowledge, education and practice throughout the entire simulation process, and beyond.</p>en
dc.subjectNursing knowledge and practiceen
dc.subjectPrebriefingen
dc.subjectSimulation learningen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T18:42:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T18:42:15Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
dc.description.noteOne combined slide deck was submitted for all presentations in the symposium. This slide deck will be attached to other records in the repository.-
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