Clinical Practice Characteristics of Nurse Practitioners Managing the Care of Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622083
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Clinical Practice Characteristics of Nurse Practitioners Managing the Care of Older Adults
Other Titles:
Clinical Care Practices
Author(s):
Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Shaughnessy, Marianne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Zeta
Author Details:
Laurie Kennedy-Malone, PhD, GNP-BC, FAANP, FGSA, Professional Experience: I have been a member of Sigma Theta Tau since 1984. Since 1990 I have been a member of the Gamma Zeta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. I have been very active as a member of Gamma Zeta. I have served as Junior and Senior Counselor, Nominating Chair (twice), Awards Committee Chair, Vice President and President. I was selected to be a Chiron Mentor for 2004. She has published research in the area of practice characteristics of gerontological nurse practitioners. Laurie is one of the authors of Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA). (2015). GAPNA consensus statement on proficiencies for the APRN gerontological specialist. She is the recipient of numerous awards as a nurse educator and has received two AJN Book of the Year Awards. She has served as a mentor for two of Sigma Theta Tau International mentorship programs. Author Summary: Dr. Laurie Kennedy-Malone has been a gerontological nurse practitioner for over 35 years and a nurse educator for 27 years at the UNCG She is the recipient of two AJN books of the year awards. Laurie served as a member of the writing group for the GAPNA Consensus Statement on Proficiencies for the APRN Gerontological Specialist (2015).She is s a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.
Abstract:

Purpose: A national survey of nurse practitioners (NP) who manage the care of older adults in the United States was conducted to determine the practice characteristics in terms of engagement in professional activities and clinical skills in relationship to years of experience as a nurse practitioner, practice setting, and population foci nurse practitioner preparation (adult, gerontological, adult-gerontology, family, or other).

Methods: The Advanced Practice Nurses Managing the Care of Older Adults Practice Profile (APNMCOA), a 153 item survey designed to ascertain practice characteristics of nurse practitioners managing the care of older adults was developed to be administered in an on-line survey format. Using a variety of electronic communication to invite nurse practitioners to participate in the study, the survey was made available for two months for nurse practitioners to voluntarily complete and submit. The APNMCOA is divided into five sections. The first section pertains to demographic information, followed by a section on type of national certification, educational preparation and prescriptive privileges. The nurse practitioners are then asked to rate the frequency and importance of 61 professional activities. Given next a list of 41 clinical procedures, the nurse practitioners were asked to indicate where they learned how to perform the procedure and how often they performed the procedure. The final section of the survey pertained to prescribing patterns of specific classes of medications.

Results: Over 1200 nurse practitioners responded to the survey during the two month time period that the survey was available on-line. With an average age of 51, the majority of respondents were master’s prepared Caucasian females with prescribing privileges, DEA number billing under their National Provider Identifier Standard number. The average number of years practicing as a nurse practitioner was 11. Only a small percentage of the NPs (12%) responded that they were billing “incident-to” the work of a physician in their practice. Many of the respondents indicated that they held more than one national certification as a nurse practitioner and multiple subspecialty certifications. The educational preparation of nurse practitioners responding was almost divided evenly amongst adult, gerontological, and family nurse practitioners with a small remaining percentage indicating preparation as an adult-gerontology acute or adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner. The majority reported having prescription privileges their own DEA number and billing using the NP special national provider number. When examining the responses to the 61 professional activities which were indicative of engaging in gerontological specific practice, the respondents more often responded that they valued the activity more than they actually engaged in the activity. Procedures that nurse practitioners responded that they regularly perform included clinical skills performed by primarily by registered nurses as well as procedures often deemed medical acts in state nurse practice regulations.

Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that nurse practitioners manage complex care of older adults across multiple practice settings. Findings of this study need to be disseminated to nurse educators, policy makers and consumers alike.

Keywords:
clinical skills; nurse practitioners; practice characteristics
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17D13
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleClinical Practice Characteristics of Nurse Practitioners Managing the Care of Older Adultsen_US
dc.title.alternativeClinical Care Practicesen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy-Malone, Laurieen
dc.contributor.authorShaughnessy, Marianneen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Zetaen
dc.author.detailsLaurie Kennedy-Malone, PhD, GNP-BC, FAANP, FGSA, Professional Experience: I have been a member of Sigma Theta Tau since 1984. Since 1990 I have been a member of the Gamma Zeta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. I have been very active as a member of Gamma Zeta. I have served as Junior and Senior Counselor, Nominating Chair (twice), Awards Committee Chair, Vice President and President. I was selected to be a Chiron Mentor for 2004. She has published research in the area of practice characteristics of gerontological nurse practitioners. Laurie is one of the authors of Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA). (2015). GAPNA consensus statement on proficiencies for the APRN gerontological specialist. She is the recipient of numerous awards as a nurse educator and has received two AJN Book of the Year Awards. She has served as a mentor for two of Sigma Theta Tau International mentorship programs. Author Summary: Dr. Laurie Kennedy-Malone has been a gerontological nurse practitioner for over 35 years and a nurse educator for 27 years at the UNCG She is the recipient of two AJN books of the year awards. Laurie served as a member of the writing group for the GAPNA Consensus Statement on Proficiencies for the APRN Gerontological Specialist (2015).She is s a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622083-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>A national survey of nurse practitioners (NP) who manage the care of older adults in the United States was conducted to determine the practice characteristics in terms of engagement in professional activities and clinical skills in relationship to years of experience as a nurse practitioner, practice setting, and population foci nurse practitioner preparation (adult, gerontological, adult-gerontology, family, or other).</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>The Advanced Practice Nurses Managing the Care of Older Adults Practice Profile (APNMCOA), a 153 item survey designed to ascertain practice characteristics of nurse practitioners managing the care of older adults was developed to be administered in an on-line survey format. Using a variety of electronic communication to invite nurse practitioners to participate in the study, the survey was made available for two months for nurse practitioners to voluntarily complete and submit. The APNMCOA is divided into five sections. The first section pertains to demographic information, followed by a section on type of national certification, educational preparation and prescriptive privileges. The nurse practitioners are then asked to rate the frequency and importance of 61 professional activities. Given next a list of 41 clinical procedures, the nurse practitioners were asked to indicate where they learned how to perform the procedure and how often they performed the procedure. The final section of the survey pertained to prescribing patterns of specific classes of medications.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Over 1200 nurse practitioners responded to the survey during the two month time period that the survey was available on-line. With an average age of 51, the majority of respondents were master’s prepared Caucasian females with prescribing privileges, DEA number billing under their National Provider Identifier Standard number. The average number of years practicing as a nurse practitioner was 11. Only a small percentage of the NPs (12%) responded that they were billing “incident-to” the work of a physician in their practice. Many of the respondents indicated that they held more than one national certification as a nurse practitioner and multiple subspecialty certifications. The educational preparation of nurse practitioners responding was almost divided evenly amongst adult, gerontological, and family nurse practitioners with a small remaining percentage indicating preparation as an adult-gerontology acute or adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner. The majority reported having prescription privileges their own DEA number and billing using the NP special national provider number. When examining the responses to the 61 professional activities which were indicative of engaging in gerontological specific practice, the respondents more often responded that they valued the activity more than they actually engaged in the activity. Procedures that nurse practitioners responded that they regularly perform included clinical skills performed by primarily by registered nurses as well as procedures often deemed medical acts in state nurse practice regulations.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The results of this study indicate that nurse practitioners manage complex care of older adults across multiple practice settings. Findings of this study need to be disseminated to nurse educators, policy makers and consumers alike.</p>en
dc.subjectclinical skillsen
dc.subjectnurse practitionersen
dc.subjectpractice characteristicsen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T19:29:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T19:29:16Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.