The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and Visions for the Future

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622085
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and Visions for the Future
Other Titles:
The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and Visions for the Future [Symposium]
Author(s):
Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon
Author Details:
Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk – recognized nationally/globally for her research-based and innovative approaches to a wide range of health care challenges – is Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, and Professor and Dean of the College of Nursing at The Ohio State University. Also a professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at OSU’s College of Medicine, Dr. Melnyk’s expertise spans evidence-based practice, intervention research, child and adolescent mental health, and health and wellness.
Abstract:

The rapid expansion of DNP programs in the United States has resulted in great variability in curriculum and the final DNP project. However, the principles upon which the DNP was endorsed by the American Colleges of Nursing remain unchanged and include: (1) advanced competencies for increasingly complex clinical, faculty and leadership roles; (2) enhanced knowledge to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes; (3) advanced leadership skills; (4) parity with other health professionals; (5) increased faculty for clinical instruction; (6) improved image (AACN, 2004, p.7). As outlined by the DNP Essentials document, the objective of the DNP is not to conduct rigorous research (AACN, 2006). The DNP prepared nurse is a healthcare leader with expertise in translating research into practice to improve health care quality and patient outcomes (Melynk, 2013; Melynk, 2016).

Many DNP programs continue to require their DNP students to conduct research as their final scholarly project. This has resulted in increasing confusion among both academic institutions and health care systems. This issue is in part perpetuated by the fact that many nursing faculty are new to evidence-based practice (EBP), having never had formal education and skill development in EBP. Faculty cannot teach what they themselves do not know (Melynk, 2013). Improving DNP curricula will require that nursing colleges invest in EBP education for their faculty including EBP skill building workshops so the faculty is best positioned to mentor and advise DNP students (Melynk, 2013).

Administrators in the service setting must also have a clear understanding of the preparation of the DNP nurse so that they can align role responsibilities to the practice/service setting. This includes providing career advancement opportunities such as clinical ladders.

PhD prepared nurses and DNP prepared nurses have great opportunities to transform healthcare through collaborative efforts steeped in their combined expertise: the PhD as the generator of external evidence from rigorous research; and the DNP as the best generator of internal evidence from quality improvement, outcomes management, and evidence-based projects (Melynk, 2013; Melynk, 2016). This model of PhD-DNP collaboration offers tremendous opportunities for nursing science as we move forward in closing the gap of moving research from the academic sphere into the practice setting.

Keywords:
Clinical Outcomes; Doctor of Nursing Practice; Evidence-Based Practice
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17D02
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship
Note:
One combined slide deck was submitted for all presentations in the symposium. This slide deck will be attached to other records in the repository. Please look for this session within the combined presentation.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and Visions for the Futureen_US
dc.title.alternativeThe Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and Visions for the Future [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorMelnyk, Bernadette Mazureken
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilonen
dc.author.detailsBernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk – recognized nationally/globally for her research-based and innovative approaches to a wide range of health care challenges – is Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, and Professor and Dean of the College of Nursing at The Ohio State University. Also a professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at OSU’s College of Medicine, Dr. Melnyk’s expertise spans evidence-based practice, intervention research, child and adolescent mental health, and health and wellness.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622085-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The rapid expansion of DNP programs in the United States has resulted in great variability in curriculum and the final DNP project. However, the principles upon which the DNP was endorsed by the American Colleges of Nursing remain unchanged and include: (1) advanced competencies for increasingly complex clinical, faculty and leadership roles; (2) enhanced knowledge to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes; (3) advanced leadership skills; (4) parity with other health professionals; (5) increased faculty for clinical instruction; (6) improved image (AACN, 2004, p.7). As outlined by the DNP Essentials document, the objective of the DNP is not to conduct rigorous research (AACN, 2006). The DNP prepared nurse is a healthcare leader with expertise in translating research into practice to improve health care quality and patient outcomes (Melynk, 2013; Melynk, 2016).</span></p> <p>Many DNP programs continue to require their DNP students to conduct research as their final scholarly project. This has resulted in increasing confusion among both academic institutions and health care systems. This issue is in part perpetuated by the fact that many nursing faculty are new to evidence-based practice (EBP), having never had formal education and skill development in EBP. Faculty cannot teach what they themselves do not know (Melynk, 2013). Improving DNP curricula will require that nursing colleges invest in EBP education for their faculty including EBP skill building workshops so the faculty is best positioned to mentor and advise DNP students (Melynk, 2013).</p> <p>Administrators in the service setting must also have a clear understanding of the preparation of the DNP nurse so that they can align role responsibilities to the practice/service setting. This includes providing career advancement opportunities such as clinical ladders.</p> <p>PhD prepared nurses and DNP prepared nurses have great opportunities to transform healthcare through collaborative efforts steeped in their combined expertise: the PhD as the generator of external evidence from rigorous research; and the DNP as the best generator of internal evidence from quality improvement, outcomes management, and evidence-based projects (Melynk, 2013; Melynk, 2016). This model of PhD-DNP collaboration offers tremendous opportunities for nursing science as we move forward in closing the gap of moving research from the academic sphere into the practice setting.</p>en
dc.subjectClinical Outcomesen
dc.subjectDoctor of Nursing Practiceen
dc.subjectEvidence-Based Practiceen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T19:39:07Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T19:39:07Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
dc.description.noteOne combined slide deck was submitted for all presentations in the symposium. This slide deck will be attached to other records in the repository. Please look for this session within the combined presentation.-
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