Partnering With Community Health Workers and Faith-Based Organizations to Provide Hypertension Management in Haiti

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622086
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Partnering With Community Health Workers and Faith-Based Organizations to Provide Hypertension Management in Haiti
Other Titles:
Cardiac Disease Health Promotion
Author(s):
Cortes, Cynthia G.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Eta
Author Details:
Cynthia G. Cortes, DrPH, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC, COI, Professional Experience: 2009-present Professor of Nursing, Graduate Department, Sanford University 1998-2009: Pediatric nurse practitioner, Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Children's Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama I have lived in Peru, Bolivia, and Mexico and have traveled to numerous countries participating and leading health related activities. Author Summary: Cyndi Cortes has both the education and experience to present on the health promotion and chronic condition described in the abstract. She has vast experience in seeing patients in developing countries and was instrumental in the development of the community health worker training.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The purpose of the program was for U.S. based healthcare providers to manage Haitian patients’ hypertension through bimonthly clinics and community health workers to monitor blood pressures weekly. Approximately 27% of Haitian adults have raised blood pressures; cardiovascular diseases account for 24% of the total deaths in Haiti and stroke is the leading cause of death (WHO,2012). Community health workers (CHW) have been effective globally in multiple education activities. In Haiti, CHW have been instrumental in providing education on cholera prevention and control (CDC, n.d.) as well as education and preventive services to people with HIV.

Methods:

Potential health promoters were recruited from churches to receive training in general health promotion and disease prevention, basic anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system, proper techniques for assessing blood pressure, documentation of blood pressure, and when to refer those with elevated blood pressure for additional assessment and hypertension management. Stethoscopes and blood pressure cuffs were provided to the health promoters who passed their blood pressure validation. The education was provided by a nurse practitioner with vast experience in delivering health care in developing countries.

A general medical clinic was conducted in the West Region of Haiti by U.S. healthcare providers and persons with systolic blood pressures over 140 mm/Hg and diastolic blood pressures over 90 mm/Hg were eligible to participate in an ongoing hypertension management clinic. Patients were given a sufficient quantity of medication to last until their scheduled appointment at the hypertension management clinic approximately 2 months from the initial date of service. Guidelines for prescribing anti-hypertensive medication were evidenced based and developed in collaboration with a nephrologist based on drug effectiveness in the Haitian population and not requiring electrolyte monitoring (Roehm, 2010; Weber et al., 2014).

Results:

At the general medical clinic 115 patients were started on medication to treat hypertension. At the first follow-up clinic 22 patients returned; 10 of the 22 returned for the second follow-up; and 7 of the 10 patients were also seen at the third follow-up clinic. Amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide were the primary medications prescribed. Of the 31 patients seen at least twice, blood pressures were controlled for 10 patients.

Conclusion:

Additional strategies need to be developed to promote lifestyle modifications to decrease the risk for hypertension, increase adequate blood pressure monitoring, and increase medication adherence in the Haitian population. Nurse practitioners are prepared to provide both training for CHW and hypertension management for patients.

Keywords:
Haiti; Community Health Workers; Hypertension Management
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17D14
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePartnering With Community Health Workers and Faith-Based Organizations to Provide Hypertension Management in Haitien_US
dc.title.alternativeCardiac Disease Health Promotionen
dc.contributor.authorCortes, Cynthia G.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Etaen
dc.author.detailsCynthia G. Cortes, DrPH, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC, COI, Professional Experience: 2009-present Professor of Nursing, Graduate Department, Sanford University 1998-2009: Pediatric nurse practitioner, Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Children's Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama I have lived in Peru, Bolivia, and Mexico and have traveled to numerous countries participating and leading health related activities. Author Summary: Cyndi Cortes has both the education and experience to present on the health promotion and chronic condition described in the abstract. She has vast experience in seeing patients in developing countries and was instrumental in the development of the community health worker training.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622086-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of the program was for U.S. based healthcare providers to manage Haitian patients’ hypertension through bimonthly clinics and community health workers to monitor blood pressures weekly. Approximately 27% of Haitian adults have raised blood pressures; cardiovascular diseases account for 24% of the total deaths in Haiti and stroke is the leading cause of death (WHO,2012). Community health workers (CHW) have been effective globally in multiple education activities. In Haiti, CHW have been instrumental in providing education on cholera prevention and control (CDC, n.d.) as well as education and preventive services to people with HIV.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>Potential health promoters were recruited from churches to receive training in general health promotion and disease prevention, basic anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system, proper techniques for assessing blood pressure, documentation of blood pressure, and when to refer those with elevated blood pressure for additional assessment and hypertension management. Stethoscopes and blood pressure cuffs were provided to the health promoters who passed their blood pressure validation. The education was provided by a nurse practitioner with vast experience in delivering health care in developing countries.</p> <p>A general medical clinic was conducted in the West Region of Haiti by U.S. healthcare providers and persons with systolic blood pressures over 140 mm/Hg and diastolic blood pressures over 90 mm/Hg were eligible to participate in an ongoing hypertension management clinic. Patients were given a sufficient quantity of medication to last until their scheduled appointment at the hypertension management clinic approximately 2 months from the initial date of service. Guidelines for prescribing anti-hypertensive medication were evidenced based and developed in collaboration with a nephrologist based on drug effectiveness in the Haitian population and not requiring electrolyte monitoring (Roehm, 2010; Weber et al., 2014).</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>At the general medical clinic 115 patients were started on medication to treat hypertension. At the first follow-up clinic 22 patients returned; 10 of the 22 returned for the second follow-up; and 7 of the 10 patients were also seen at the third follow-up clinic. Amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide were the primary medications prescribed. Of the 31 patients seen at least twice, blood pressures were controlled for 10 patients.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Additional strategies need to be developed to promote lifestyle modifications to decrease the risk for hypertension, increase adequate blood pressure monitoring, and increase medication adherence in the Haitian population. Nurse practitioners are prepared to provide both training for CHW and hypertension management for patients.</p>en
dc.subjectHaitien
dc.subjectCommunity Health Workersen
dc.subjectHypertension Managementen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T19:45:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T19:45:32Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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