Integrating the Doctor of Nursing Practice in Practice Settings: Implications for Clinical Outcomes and Scholarship

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622087
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Integrating the Doctor of Nursing Practice in Practice Settings: Implications for Clinical Outcomes and Scholarship
Other Titles:
The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and the Vision for the Future [Symposium]
Author(s):
Nash, Mary G.; Chipps, Esther M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda
Author Details:
Mary G. Nash, PhD, MSN, MBA, BSN, Shared Services, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA; Esther M. Chipps, PhD, MS, BSN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus, OH, USA
Abstract:

The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) has now moved into its’ first decade of existence. Early discussions among nursing thought leaders were focused on promoting the development, assessment and evaluation of DNP curriculums to meet the American Associations of the Colleges of Nursing (AACN) recommendations (Melnyk, 2013). As the profession of nursing has gained experience with the DNP graduates, we are entering the next phase of discussion; the integration and operationalization of the role within healthcare systems. Nurse leaders in academic and practice settings have the opportunity to collaborate on ways to identify and measure the impact of this new level of education on the outcomes that matter most in today’s health care delivery system. To date, there is still a gap in demonstrating the outcomes of the DNP in patient care and healthcare delivery system transformations.

As a result of our increased collaboration with our College of Nursing, our academic medical center has experienced a rapid increase in the number of DNP prepared staff. The DNP roles in our health care system have crossed all areas of nursing practice including senior and mid-level nurse leaders, advanced practice nurses, and nurse educators. To effectively measure the difference that the addition of DNP nurses made we examined the best practices and strategies to determine what outcomes were potentially impacted, and what difference moving to a more doctorally influenced nursing practice environment had on staff.

One best practice was the formulation of a DNP workgroup open to all DNP prepared nurses in our health system. The goal of this group was to complete a gap analyses and make recommendations to enhance roles and practice to the Chief Nurse Executive’s Council. The DNP workgroup aimed to: (1) examine the AACN DNP competencies in relation to our job descriptions/roles and to our working environment; (2) examine the impact of DNP prepared nurses in rapid translation of research findings and the implementation of evidence; (3) examine how our organization can increase nursing scholarly output and maximize nursing’s’ contribution to our academic medical center and the nursing community at large; (4) increase our collaborative efforts in evidence-based practice and research with the College of Nursing and; (5) increase job satisfaction among doctorally prepared staff. To achieve this, we did a crosswalk comparing the current job descriptions of our DNP prepared nurse leaders, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and nurse educators with the core competencies of The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice. Working in smaller subgroups by job title, the following questions were examined for each of the eight AACN DNP competencies: (1) What are we currently accomplishing within our current job descriptions/roles?; (2) What could we potentially accomplish?; and (3) What strategies could we apply to enhance our accomplishments and maximize our contributions to the organization? After reviewing the work of each subgroup, we identified eight major themes. Using these themes, we reviewed the literature and prepared recommendations for the Chief Nurse Executive’s Council.

Keywords:
Doctorate of Nursing Practice; Executive Nursing Leadership; Organizational Change
Repository Posting Date:
24-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17D02
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship
Note:
One combined slide deck was submitted for all presentations in the symposium. This slide deck will be attached to other records in the repository. Please look for this session within the combined presentation.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleIntegrating the Doctor of Nursing Practice in Practice Settings: Implications for Clinical Outcomes and Scholarshipen_US
dc.title.alternativeThe Doctor of Nursing Practice: Reflections on the Past and the Vision for the Future [Symposium]en
dc.contributor.authorNash, Mary G.en
dc.contributor.authorChipps, Esther M.en
dc.contributor.departmentLambdaen
dc.author.detailsMary G. Nash, PhD, MSN, MBA, BSN, Shared Services, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA; Esther M. Chipps, PhD, MS, BSN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus, OH, USAen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622087-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) has now moved into its’ first decade of existence. Early discussions among nursing thought leaders were focused on promoting the development, assessment and evaluation of DNP curriculums to meet the American Associations of the Colleges of Nursing (AACN) recommendations (Melnyk, 2013). As the profession of nursing has gained experience with the DNP graduates, we are entering the next phase of discussion; the integration and operationalization of the role within healthcare systems. Nurse leaders in academic and practice settings have the opportunity to collaborate on ways to identify and measure the impact of this new level of education on the outcomes that matter most in today’s health care delivery system. To date, there is still a gap in demonstrating the outcomes of the DNP in patient care and healthcare delivery system transformations.</span></p> <p>As a result of our increased collaboration with our College of Nursing, our academic medical center has experienced a rapid increase in the number of DNP prepared staff. The DNP roles in our health care system have crossed all areas of nursing practice including senior and mid-level nurse leaders, advanced practice nurses, and nurse educators. To effectively measure the difference that the addition of DNP nurses made we examined the best practices and strategies to determine what outcomes were potentially impacted, and what difference moving to a more doctorally influenced nursing practice environment had on staff.</p> <p>One best practice was the formulation of a DNP workgroup open to all DNP prepared nurses in our health system. The goal of this group was to complete a gap analyses and make recommendations to enhance roles and practice to the Chief Nurse Executive’s Council. The DNP workgroup aimed to: (1) examine the AACN DNP competencies in relation to our job descriptions/roles and to our working environment; (2) examine the impact of DNP prepared nurses in rapid translation of research findings and the implementation of evidence; (3) examine how our organization can increase nursing scholarly output and maximize nursing’s’ contribution to our academic medical center and the nursing community at large; (4) increase our collaborative efforts in evidence-based practice and research with the College of Nursing and; (5) increase job satisfaction among doctorally prepared staff. To achieve this, we did a crosswalk comparing the current job descriptions of our DNP prepared nurse leaders, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and nurse educators with the core competencies of <em>The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice</em>. Working in smaller subgroups by job title, the following questions were examined for each of the eight AACN DNP competencies: (1) What are we currently accomplishing within our current job descriptions/roles?; (2) What could we potentially accomplish?; and (3) What strategies could we apply to enhance our accomplishments and maximize our contributions to the organization? After reviewing the work of each subgroup, we identified eight major themes. Using these themes, we reviewed the literature and prepared recommendations for the Chief Nurse Executive’s Council.</p>en
dc.subjectDoctorate of Nursing Practiceen
dc.subjectExecutive Nursing Leadershipen
dc.subjectOrganizational Changeen
dc.date.available2017-07-24T19:49:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T19:49:40Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
dc.description.noteOne combined slide deck was submitted for all presentations in the symposium. This slide deck will be attached to other records in the repository. Please look for this session within the combined presentation.-
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