Physical Activity in U.S. Asian Indian Women: Comparison of Acculturation Level and Immigrant Status

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622110
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Physical Activity in U.S. Asian Indian Women: Comparison of Acculturation Level and Immigrant Status
Other Titles:
Promoting Physical Activity in Women
Author(s):
Mathew Joseph, Nitha; Hanneman, Sandra K.; Bishop, Sheryl L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Pi
Author Details:
Nitha Mathew Joseph, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Dr. Mathew Joseph is Assistant Professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing. She has eight years of critical care experience and five years of adult psychiatry nursing experience, both in India and the U.S. She graduated with a PhD in May 2014. Author Summary: Dr. Mathew Joseph is an Assistant Professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing. Her research interest is the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Asian Indians. Her research study stemmed from strong evidence that Asian Indians are at greater risk for morbidity and mortality from heart disease and diabetes compared to whites in the U.S., partly due to a lower rate of participation in physical activities.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Asian Indian women generally have low levels of physical activity, which may increase their risk for chronic diseases compared with Whites and other immigrant groups in the U.S. (Daniel, Wilber, Marquez & Farran, 2013; Mathew Joseph & Bishop, 2014). Acculturation has also been associated with an increased risk for obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease among Asian Indians (Khan, Jackson & Momen, 2016; Venkatesh, Weatherspoon, Kaplowitz & Song, 2013). Additionally, acculturation and immigrant status have been implicated as contributors to low physical activity levels (Walker, Caperchione, Mummery & Chau, 2015). The purpose of the study was to determine differences in three different domains of physical activity (occupational physical activity, household physical activity, leisure time physical activity) and sedentary behavior by acculturation level and immigrant status in U.S. Asian Indian women. Moreover, physical functioning was assessed as a possible explanation of differences in physical activity, independent of acculturation and immigrant status.

Methods:

A cross-sectional, descriptive, comparative design was used with a convenience sample of 261 immigrant and nonimmigrant Asian Indian women living in Houston, Texas, who completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long form, the Modified Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale, and the Physical Functioning subscale from the RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Based on the distribution of the data, chi-square, one-way analysis of variance, or the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare study variables among acculturation-immigrant groups. Because the study premise was that activity is affected by acculturation and immigrant status, participants were categorized into four groups according to their acculturation level and immigrant status: low acculturation–immigrant, high acculturation–immigrant, low acculturation–nonimmigrant, and high acculturation–nonimmigrant.

Results:

The low acculturation–immigrant women had the highest metabolic equivalent of task (MET) scores for occupational (59.8 MET hrs/wk) and total physical activity (102.6 MET hrs/wk), even though they were older and had lower physical functioning scores (both, p < .001). The high acculturation–nonimmigrant group had the highest leisure physical activity (21.9 MET hrs/wk) and sedentary behavior (47.2 MET hrs/wk) scores. The two high-acculturated groups (immigrant and nonimmigrant) did not differ significantly in occupational and total physical activity MET scores, suggesting that these two physical activity domains are more closely associated with acculturation level than with immigrant status. The high acculturation–nonimmigrant group had the highest leisure physical activity (21.9 MET hrs/wk) and sedentary (47.2 MET hrs/wk) scores. However, the high-acculturation groups had greater proportions of students than the low-acculturated women (Χ2 = 23.55, df = 4, p = .0001), and this may partly explain group differences in sedentary behavior.

Conclusion:

Acculturation is inversely related to occupational and total physical activity and may have a direct relation to leisure physical activity and sedentary behavior, the latter of which may be confounded by employment versus student roles. The findings suggest that acculturation of Asian Indian women to the United States is associated with less physical activity, which may increase the risk for chronic diseases. This study is a significant first step on a continuum of research toward the development of effective public health nursing interventions to promote physically active lifestyles. Nurses and other health professionals can consider acculturation levels when developing community- and work-based interventions to promote physically active lifestyles in Asian Indian women.

Keywords:
Acculturation; Asian Indians; Physical Activity
Repository Posting Date:
25-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17H14
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePhysical Activity in U.S. Asian Indian Women: Comparison of Acculturation Level and Immigrant Statusen_US
dc.title.alternativePromoting Physical Activity in Womenen
dc.contributor.authorMathew Joseph, Nithaen
dc.contributor.authorHanneman, Sandra K.en
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Sheryl L.en
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Pien
dc.author.detailsNitha Mathew Joseph, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Dr. Mathew Joseph is Assistant Professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing. She has eight years of critical care experience and five years of adult psychiatry nursing experience, both in India and the U.S. She graduated with a PhD in May 2014. Author Summary: Dr. Mathew Joseph is an Assistant Professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing. Her research interest is the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Asian Indians. Her research study stemmed from strong evidence that Asian Indians are at greater risk for morbidity and mortality from heart disease and diabetes compared to whites in the U.S., partly due to a lower rate of participation in physical activities.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622110-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Asian Indian women generally have low levels of physical activity, which may increase their risk for chronic diseases compared with Whites and other immigrant groups in the U.S. (Daniel, Wilber, Marquez & Farran, 2013; Mathew Joseph & Bishop, 2014). Acculturation has also been associated with an increased risk for obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease among Asian Indians (Khan, Jackson & Momen, 2016; Venkatesh, Weatherspoon, Kaplowitz & Song, 2013). Additionally, acculturation and immigrant status have been implicated as contributors to low physical activity levels (Walker, Caperchione, Mummery & Chau, 2015). The purpose of the study was to determine differences in three different domains of physical activity (occupational physical activity, household physical activity, leisure time physical activity) and sedentary behavior by acculturation level and immigrant status in U.S. Asian Indian women. Moreover, physical functioning was assessed as a possible explanation of differences in physical activity, independent of acculturation and immigrant status.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>A cross-sectional, descriptive, comparative design was used with a convenience sample of 261 immigrant and nonimmigrant Asian Indian women living in Houston, Texas, who completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long form, the Modified Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale, and the Physical Functioning subscale from the RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Based on the distribution of the data, chi-square, one-way analysis of variance, or the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare study variables among acculturation-immigrant groups. Because the study premise was that activity is affected by acculturation and immigrant status, participants were categorized into four groups according to their acculturation level and immigrant status: low acculturation–immigrant, high acculturation–immigrant, low acculturation–nonimmigrant, and high acculturation–nonimmigrant.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The low acculturation–immigrant women had the highest metabolic equivalent of task (MET) scores for occupational (59.8 MET hrs/wk) and total physical activity (102.6 MET hrs/wk), even though they were older and had lower physical functioning scores (both, p < .001). The high acculturation–nonimmigrant group had the highest leisure physical activity (21.9 MET hrs/wk) and sedentary behavior (47.2 MET hrs/wk) scores. The two high-acculturated groups (immigrant and nonimmigrant) did not differ significantly in occupational and total physical activity MET scores, suggesting that these two physical activity domains are more closely associated with acculturation level than with immigrant status. The high acculturation–nonimmigrant group had the highest leisure physical activity (21.9 MET hrs/wk) and sedentary (47.2 MET hrs/wk) scores. However, the high-acculturation groups had greater proportions of students than the low-acculturated women (Χ2 = 23.55, df = 4, p = .0001), and this may partly explain group differences in sedentary behavior.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Acculturation is inversely related to occupational and total physical activity and may have a direct relation to leisure physical activity and sedentary behavior, the latter of which may be confounded by employment versus student roles. The findings suggest that acculturation of Asian Indian women to the United States is associated with less physical activity, which may increase the risk for chronic diseases. This study is a significant first step on a continuum of research toward the development of effective public health nursing interventions to promote physically active lifestyles. Nurses and other health professionals can consider acculturation levels when developing community- and work-based interventions to promote physically active lifestyles in Asian Indian women.</p>en
dc.subjectAcculturationen
dc.subjectAsian Indiansen
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen
dc.date.available2017-07-25T15:12:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T15:12:02Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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