Measuring What Matters: A Multi-Site Study of Self-Reported and Objectively Measured Nursing EBP Knowledge

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622120
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Measuring What Matters: A Multi-Site Study of Self-Reported and Objectively Measured Nursing EBP Knowledge
Other Titles:
Promoting Research in Nursing
Author(s):
Spurlock, Darrell Jr.; McNelis, Anglea; Wonder, Amy Hagedorn; Ironside, Pam
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Beta
Author Details:
Darrell Spurlock, PhD Jr., RN, NEA-BC, ANEF, Professional Experience: 15+ years of academic nursing education experience, author or presenter on over 75 peer-reviewed scholarly publications and presentations; research/methods consultant on over 50 research, QI, and EBP projects; extensive experience with quantitative data collection & analysis. Author Summary: Darrell Spurlock, Jr. PhD, RN, NEA-BC, ANEF is Associate Professor of Nursing, Scholarship Director, and Director of the Leadership Center for Nursing Education Research at Widener University in Chester, PA. Dr. Spurlock is a nurse-academic psychologist and has over 75 peer-reviewed publications and presentations. Dr. Spurlock is a frequent workshop presenter on EBP, measurement, and research methods.
Abstract:

Purpose: Research findings from fields as diverse as psychology and medicine (Blanch-Hartigan, 2011; Zell & Krizan, 2014) suggest that when tasked with evaluating one's own knowledge and abilities, people often over- or under-estimate themselves when their self-ratings are compared to more objective measures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nurses' self-reported EBP knowledge, attitudes, and skills compared to EBP knowledge measured using a previously developed standards-based, objective test of EBP knowledge. Findings from the current study are compared with past research to provide a wider perspective on the state of nurses' EBP knowledge levels and approaches to measuring EBP knowledge, skills, and abilities.

Methods: Practicing nurses from two Magnet®-designated hospitals in the Midwest United States were recruited to the study. In proctored data collection sessions, subjects completed a 17-item demographic and professional characteristics questionnaire, the self-report Evidence-based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ; Upton & Upton, 2006), and the Evidence-based Practice Knowledge Assessment in Nursing (EKAN; Spurlock & Wonder, 2015), a 20-item multiple-choice EBP knowledge test developed based on two widely-adopted US EBP competency frameworks. Data from N= 151 subjects indicated subjects were 95.1% White/Caucasian, 92% female, and had an average age of 40.9 years (Range 23-66 years). Nearly all (99.4%) of subjects reported English as their primary language and 57.7% reported having a bachelor's degree in nursing as their highest degree.

Results:  Subjects provided positive ratings overall on the three subscales of the EBPQ. Considering a maximum score of 7, subjects provided the highest average ratings on the EBP attitudes subscale (M = 5.51, SD = .98), followed by EBP knowledge (M = 4.68, SD = .81), and then on practice/use of EBP (M = 4.48, SD 1.37). The mean sum score on the EKAN was 10.58 (SD = 2.87) out of a possible 20 points. One-way ANOVA (with familywise error correction for alpha) showed no statistically significant difference on any subscale of the EBPQ across nurses’ educational levels (e.g., associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degree levels). When EKAN scores were compared based on subjects’ highest level of education, a statistically significant difference in EKAN scores was observed (9.0 for associate’s degrees versus 12.7 for master’s degrees; F3,159 = 11.84, < 0.001). While scores from each of the subscales of the EBPQ were statistically significantly correlated with each other (r = .350 - .595, p < .01), correlations between EBPQ subscales and the EKAN sum score were small (= .017 - .123) and statistically nonsignificant. To further evaluate effect size, a two-step hierarchical regression analysis showed that educational level, but not EBPQ subscale scores, predicted EKAN sum scores (F(1,149) = 30.43, p < .001, R2= .170).

Conclusion:  In this study, nurses’ EBP attitudes and self-reported knowledge and skills showed a near zero correlation with more objectively measured EBP knowledge. Higher levels of education were associated with higher scores on the EKAN knowledge measure but not with EBP attitudes, practices, or self-reported knowledge. These findings are consistent with those from a broad range of fields showing that accurate self-assessment is often difficult, as illustrated by the low concordance between self-assessed and objectively measured knowledge. Nurses' EBP knowledge levels in the current study are similar to those reported elsewhere (e.g., Spurlock & Wonder, 2015). Implications for leaders and educators in academic and clinical environments include re-evaluating strategies for assessing learning outcomes with a focus on using more direct, objective approaches when possible.

Keywords:
EBP Knowledge; Competence; Measurement
Repository Posting Date:
25-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17I16
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleMeasuring What Matters: A Multi-Site Study of Self-Reported and Objectively Measured Nursing EBP Knowledgeen_US
dc.title.alternativePromoting Research in Nursingen
dc.contributor.authorSpurlock, Darrell Jr.en
dc.contributor.authorMcNelis, Angleaen
dc.contributor.authorWonder, Amy Hagedornen
dc.contributor.authorIronside, Pamen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Betaen
dc.author.detailsDarrell Spurlock, PhD Jr., RN, NEA-BC, ANEF, Professional Experience: 15+ years of academic nursing education experience, author or presenter on over 75 peer-reviewed scholarly publications and presentations; research/methods consultant on over 50 research, QI, and EBP projects; extensive experience with quantitative data collection & analysis. Author Summary: Darrell Spurlock, Jr. PhD, RN, NEA-BC, ANEF is Associate Professor of Nursing, Scholarship Director, and Director of the Leadership Center for Nursing Education Research at Widener University in Chester, PA. Dr. Spurlock is a nurse-academic psychologist and has over 75 peer-reviewed publications and presentations. Dr. Spurlock is a frequent workshop presenter on EBP, measurement, and research methods.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622120-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Research findings from fields as diverse as psychology and medicine (Blanch-Hartigan, 2011; Zell & Krizan, 2014) suggest that when tasked with evaluating one's own knowledge and abilities, people often over- or under-estimate themselves when their self-ratings are compared to more objective measures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nurses' self-reported EBP knowledge, attitudes, and skills compared to EBP knowledge measured using a previously developed standards-based, objective test of EBP knowledge. Findings from the current study are compared with past research to provide a wider perspective on the state of nurses' EBP knowledge levels and approaches to measuring EBP knowledge, skills, and abilities.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>Practicing nurses from two Magnet®-designated hospitals in the Midwest United States were recruited to the study. In proctored data collection sessions, subjects completed a 17-item demographic and professional characteristics questionnaire, the self-report Evidence-based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ; Upton & Upton, 2006), and the Evidence-based Practice Knowledge Assessment in Nursing (EKAN; Spurlock & Wonder, 2015), a 20-item multiple-choice EBP knowledge test developed based on two widely-adopted US EBP competency frameworks. Data from <em>N</em>= 151 subjects indicated subjects were 95.1% White/Caucasian, 92% female, and had an average age of 40.9 years (Range 23-66 years). Nearly all (99.4%) of subjects reported English as their primary language and 57.7% reported having a bachelor's degree in nursing as their highest degree.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> Subjects provided positive ratings overall on the three subscales of the EBPQ. Considering a maximum score of 7, subjects provided the highest average ratings on the EBP attitudes subscale (<em>M</em> = 5.51, <em>SD</em> = .98), followed by EBP knowledge (<em>M</em> = 4.68, <em>SD</em> = .81), and then on practice/use of EBP (<em>M</em> = 4.48, <em>SD</em> 1.37). The mean sum score on the EKAN was 10.58 (<em>SD</em> = 2.87) out of a possible 20 points. One-way ANOVA (with familywise error correction for alpha) showed no statistically significant difference on any subscale of the EBPQ across nurses’ educational levels (e.g., associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degree levels). When EKAN scores were compared based on subjects’ highest level of education, a statistically significant difference in EKAN scores was observed (9.0 for associate’s degrees versus 12.7 for master’s degrees; <em>F</em><sub>3,159</sub> = 11.84, <em>p </em>< 0.001). While scores from each of the subscales of the EBPQ were statistically significantly correlated with each other (<em>r</em> = .350 - .595, <em>p</em> < .01), correlations between EBPQ subscales and the EKAN sum score were small (<em>r </em>= .017 - .123) and statistically nonsignificant. To further evaluate effect size, a two-step hierarchical regression analysis showed that educational level, but not EBPQ subscale scores, predicted EKAN sum scores (<em>F<sub>(1,149)</sub> </em>= 30.43,<em> p < </em>.001, <em>R<sup>2</sup></em>= .170).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> In this study, nurses’ EBP attitudes and self-reported knowledge and skills showed a near zero correlation with more objectively measured EBP knowledge. Higher levels of education were associated with higher scores on the EKAN knowledge measure but not with EBP attitudes, practices, or self-reported knowledge. These findings are consistent with those from a broad range of fields showing that accurate self-assessment is often difficult, as illustrated by the low concordance between self-assessed and objectively measured knowledge. Nurses' EBP knowledge levels in the current study are similar to those reported elsewhere (e.g., Spurlock & Wonder, 2015). Implications for leaders and educators in academic and clinical environments include re-evaluating strategies for assessing learning outcomes with a focus on using more direct, objective approaches when possible.</p>en
dc.subjectEBP Knowledgeen
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectMeasurementen
dc.date.available2017-07-25T16:35:35Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T16:35:35Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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