Adult Attachment Style and Family Presence Preference During Invasive Nursing Procedures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622121
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Adult Attachment Style and Family Presence Preference During Invasive Nursing Procedures
Other Titles:
Promoting Research in Nursing
Author(s):
Kaya, Nurten
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Nurten Kaya, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2004-2011- Asistant Profesor, Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing 2011-2012- Asistant Profesor, Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing 2012-2013- Associate Professor, Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing 2013-… -Associate Professor Istanbul University, Health Sciences Faculty, Department of Midwifery Author Summary: She completed PhD from Istanbul University, Institute of Health Sciences, Nursing Programme. She worked at Florence Nightingale Nursing Faculty, Department of Fundamentals of Nursing between 1993-2013, and she has worked at the Health Sciences Faculty since 2013. Her areas of interest are injections,complementary therapy, nursing informatics, nursing thoeries-models, nursing process. Author and co-author of articles, books on fundamentals of nursing and leader of statutory research projects.She is member of Turkish Nurses Society, Nursing Education Society.
Abstract:

Purpose:

This study was carried out in the descriptive and correlational type to examine the effect of adult attachment styles regarding the fact that the patients prefer their family members/relatives/the people they care to stand by them during invasive nursing procedures.

Methods:

The study population consisted of patients hospitalized in the observation unit of the internal medicine section in the emergency department of a university hospital. The sample consisted of 76 patients who were selected by random sampling method.

Results:

It was found that 56.6% (n=43) of the patients were female, the age average was 47.83 (SD=18.88), 65.8% (n=50) of them were married, 28.9% (n=22) of them had university or higher education, 36.8% (n=28) of them were civil servants, 93.4% (n=71) of them had social security and the remaining 6.6% (n=5) of them had green cards, 65.8% (n=50) of them had children, and 56.6% (n=43) of them were living with their families. 57.9% (n=44) of the patients said that they preferred their relatives to stand by them during invasive nursing procedures. 51.3% (n=39) of the individuals gave yes answer to the question of “Is there someone you would like him/her to stand by you especially during the intervention?”. When they were asked to identify the person they want to stand by them, mother/father, child, spouse, sibling, relatives and friends were preferred. 76.3% (n=58) of the patients gave the answer of "me" to the question of who should make the decision of status of the presence of a relative during invasive nursing procedures. When the point averages of adult attachment styles of the patients, who were included within the scope of the research, were examined, it was seen to be (potential point distribution is between 1-5 in all styles) 3.57 in indifferent, 3.02 (SD=0.63), (SD=0.57) in frightening, 2.87 (SD=0.50) in obsessive, 2.79 (SD=0.66) in confident.

Conclusion:

In addition, it was determined that the patients' adult attachment styles did not affect the status of demanding someone beside them during invasive nursing procedures (p>0.05).

Keywords:
attachment style; family presence; invasive procedures
Repository Posting Date:
25-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17I16
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleAdult Attachment Style and Family Presence Preference During Invasive Nursing Proceduresen_US
dc.title.alternativePromoting Research in Nursingen
dc.contributor.authorKaya, Nurtenen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsNurten Kaya, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2004-2011- Asistant Profesor, Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing 2011-2012- Asistant Profesor, Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing 2012-2013- Associate Professor, Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing 2013-… -Associate Professor Istanbul University, Health Sciences Faculty, Department of Midwifery Author Summary: She completed PhD from Istanbul University, Institute of Health Sciences, Nursing Programme. She worked at Florence Nightingale Nursing Faculty, Department of Fundamentals of Nursing between 1993-2013, and she has worked at the Health Sciences Faculty since 2013. Her areas of interest are injections,complementary therapy, nursing informatics, nursing thoeries-models, nursing process. Author and co-author of articles, books on fundamentals of nursing and leader of statutory research projects.She is member of Turkish Nurses Society, Nursing Education Society.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622121-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>This study was carried out in the descriptive and correlational type to examine the effect of adult attachment styles regarding the fact that the patients prefer their family members/relatives/the people they care to stand by them during invasive nursing procedures.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p><span lang="EN-US">The study population consisted of patients hospitalized in the observation unit of the internal medicine section in the emergency department of a university hospital. The sample consisted of 76 patients who were selected by random sampling method.</span></p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p><span lang="EN-US">It was found that 56.6% (n=43) of the patients were female, the age average was 47.83 (SD=18.88), 65.8% (n=50) of them were married, 28.9% (n=22) of them had university or higher education, 36.8% (n=28) of them were civil servants, 93.4% (n=71) of them had social security and the remaining 6.6% (n=5) of them had green cards, 65.8% (n=50) of them had children, and 56.6% (n=43) of them were living with their families. 57.9% (n=44) of the patients said that they preferred their relatives to stand by them during invasive nursing procedures. 51.3% (n=39) of the individuals gave yes answer to the question of “Is there someone you would like him/her to stand by you especially during the intervention?”. When they were asked to identify the person they want to stand by them, mother/father, child, spouse, sibling, relatives and friends were preferred. 76.3% (n=58) of the patients gave the answer of "me" to the question of who should make the decision of status of the presence of a relative during invasive nursing procedures. When the point averages of adult attachment styles of the patients, who were included within the scope of the research, were examined, it was seen to be (potential point distribution is between 1-5 in all styles) 3.57 in indifferent, 3.02 (SD=0.63), (SD=0.57) in frightening, 2.87 (SD=0.50) in obsessive, 2.79 (SD=0.66) in confident.</span></p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>In addition, it was determined that the patients' adult attachment styles did not affect the status of demanding someone beside them during invasive nursing procedures (p>0.05).</p>en
dc.subjectattachment styleen
dc.subjectfamily presenceen
dc.subjectinvasive proceduresen
dc.date.available2017-07-25T16:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T16:41:02Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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