Opportunities for International Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations to Improve Health Outcomes for Intimate Partner Strangulation Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622138
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Opportunities for International Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations to Improve Health Outcomes for Intimate Partner Strangulation Survivors
Other Titles:
Conversations on Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Campbell, Jacquelyn; Reed, Dominic Robert; Patch, Michelle
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Beta
Author Details:
Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professional Experience: Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN is Anna D. Wolf Chair and Professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing with a joint appointment in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and National Program Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program. Dr. Campbell has published more than 240 articles, seven books and been PI of more than 12 major NIH, CDC and NIJ grants in her decades of advocacy policy work. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Nursing, and on the Board of Futures Without Violence. Author Summary: Dr. Campbell,is Anna D. Wolf Chair and Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell has published more than 240 articles, seven books and been PI of more than 12 major NIH, CDC and NIJ grants in her decades of advocacy policy work. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Nursing, and on the Board of Futures Without Violence.
Abstract:

Purpose:  The purpose of this presentation is to describe the current health care literature on intimate partner strangulation from the US and UK, and to suggest areas for international research collaboration among nurses, physicians and domestic violence advocacy to better understand this unique form of violence and inform practice and policy efforts.

Methods:  A literature review was conducted by U.S. and U.K. researchers to illustrate the current state of the science related to intimate partner strangulation (IPS) and its health outcomes in both regions, and to identify gaps in IPS knowledge amenable to international research collaborations.

Results: Internationally, being strangled by a current or former intimate partner is a very real threat to health and life for significant numbers of women (Sorenson, Joshi & Sivitz, 2013). In the most recent U.S. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS, 2011) (Breiding et al., 2014), approximately 10% of female respondents reported surviving a strangulation attack by a current or former intimate partner at least once in their lifetimes, extrapolating to approximately 11 million U.S. adult women. The estimated prevalence ratio in NISVS shows non-fatal intimate partner strangulation to be 13 times higher in women than men, with men’s lifetime prevalence proportion of 0.7% equal to women’s 12-month prevalence proportion, suggesting an extreme gender disparity. Additionally, for female victims of intimate partner violence, prior nonfatal strangulation has been associated with a 6-fold odds of future attempted homicide and a 7-fold odds of completed homicide (Glass et al., 2008). In the U.K., evidence exists that strangulation remains largely under-reported and has far outstripped assault with a weapon as a feature of domestic abuse. This was most recently highlighted in a Scottish Crime Survey from 2014/15, in which 22.7% of women with experience of partner abuse since the age of 16 reported their partner had tried to “choke”/strangle them compared to 12.9% reporting a weapon was used against them (Murray, 2016). Nonetheless, the health implications of non-fatal strangulation remain under-assessed. Intimate partner strangulation (IPS) has been increasingly recognized as a significant risk factor for serious negative health outcomes such as carotid artery dissection, stroke, seizures, PTSD, depression and future attempted or completed homicide (Joshi, Thomas & Sorenson, 2012; Kwako et al., 2011; Le Blanc-Louvry, Papin, Vaz & Proust, 2013; Vella, 2013). However, much of the extant literature on IPS outcomes in the U.S. is limited to case reports and descriptive studies with relatively small sample sizes. Similarly, in Scotland and the wider U.K., despite occasional case studies spaced across decades reporting catastrophic injuries in living strangulation victims, there remains a dearth of IPV strangulation research and little assessment of prevalence or long term health outcomes. This is despite the evidence of its potential lethality, illustrated in a homicide report for 2014/15 in England and Wales, showing almost a quarter of female domestic homicide victims are killed in this manner (ONS, 2016).

Conclusion:  Taken together, these data indicate an urgent need for more rigorous health care research efforts regarding IPS. Many opportunities for international health care research collaborations exist, such as: greater frameworks for multi-centre, multi-national studies assessing the link between IPS and complex long term injury, using robust longitudinal, prospective and mixed methods designs; psychometric testing of IPS screening tools and protocols in different geographic populations; qualitative studies on women’s experiences seeking care after being strangled; and development and testing of staff training on IPS recognition and treatment.

Keywords:
International Collaboration; Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); Strangulation
Repository Posting Date:
25-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleOpportunities for International Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations to Improve Health Outcomes for Intimate Partner Strangulation Survivorsen_US
dc.title.alternativeConversations on Intimate Partner Violenceen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Jacquelynen
dc.contributor.authorReed, Dominic Roberten
dc.contributor.authorPatch, Michelleen
dc.contributor.departmentNu Betaen
dc.author.detailsJacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professional Experience: Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN is Anna D. Wolf Chair and Professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing with a joint appointment in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and National Program Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program. Dr. Campbell has published more than 240 articles, seven books and been PI of more than 12 major NIH, CDC and NIJ grants in her decades of advocacy policy work. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Nursing, and on the Board of Futures Without Violence. Author Summary: Dr. Campbell,is Anna D. Wolf Chair and Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell has published more than 240 articles, seven books and been PI of more than 12 major NIH, CDC and NIJ grants in her decades of advocacy policy work. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Nursing, and on the Board of Futures Without Violence.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622138-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> The purpose of this presentation is to describe the current health care literature on intimate partner strangulation from the US and UK, and to suggest areas for international research collaboration among nurses, physicians and domestic violence advocacy to better understand this unique form of violence and inform practice and policy efforts.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> A literature review was conducted by U.S. and U.K. researchers to illustrate the current state of the science related to intimate partner strangulation (IPS) and its health outcomes in both regions, and to identify gaps in IPS knowledge amenable to international research collaborations.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Internationally, being strangled by a current or former intimate partner is a very real threat to health and life for significant numbers of women (Sorenson, Joshi & Sivitz, 2013).<em> </em>In the most recent U.S. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS, 2011) (Breiding et al., 2014), approximately 10% of female respondents reported surviving a strangulation attack by a current or former intimate partner at least once in their lifetimes, extrapolating to approximately 11 million U.S. adult women. The estimated prevalence ratio in NISVS shows non-fatal intimate partner strangulation to be 13 times higher in women than men, with men’s lifetime prevalence proportion of 0.7% equal to women’s 12-month prevalence proportion, suggesting an extreme gender disparity. Additionally, for female victims of intimate partner violence, prior nonfatal strangulation has been associated with a 6-fold odds of future attempted homicide and a 7-fold odds of completed homicide (Glass et al., 2008). In the U.K., evidence exists that strangulation remains largely under-reported and has far outstripped assault with a weapon as a feature of domestic abuse. This was most recently highlighted in a Scottish Crime Survey from 2014/15, in which 22.7% of women with experience of partner abuse since the age of 16 reported their partner had tried to “choke”/strangle them compared to 12.9% reporting a weapon was used against them (Murray, 2016). Nonetheless, the health implications of non-fatal strangulation remain under-assessed. Intimate partner strangulation (IPS) has been increasingly recognized as a significant risk factor for serious negative health outcomes such as carotid artery dissection, stroke, seizures, PTSD, depression and future attempted or completed homicide (Joshi, Thomas & Sorenson, 2012; Kwako et al., 2011; Le Blanc-Louvry, Papin, Vaz & Proust, 2013; Vella, 2013). However, much of the extant literature on IPS outcomes in the U.S. is limited to case reports and descriptive studies with relatively small sample sizes. Similarly, in Scotland and the wider U.K., despite occasional case studies spaced across decades reporting catastrophic injuries in living strangulation victims, there remains a dearth of IPV strangulation research and little assessment of prevalence or long term health outcomes. This is despite the evidence of its potential lethality, illustrated in a homicide report for 2014/15 in England and Wales, showing almost a quarter of female domestic homicide victims are killed in this manner (ONS, 2016).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> Taken together, these data indicate an urgent need for more rigorous health care research efforts regarding IPS. Many opportunities for international health care research collaborations exist, such as: greater frameworks for multi-centre, multi-national studies assessing the link between IPS and complex long term injury, using robust longitudinal, prospective and mixed methods designs; psychometric testing of IPS screening tools and protocols in different geographic populations; qualitative studies on women’s experiences seeking care after being strangled; and development and testing of staff training on IPS recognition and treatment.</p>en
dc.subjectInternational Collaborationen
dc.subjectIntimate Partner Violence (IPV)en
dc.subjectStrangulationen
dc.date.available2017-07-25T18:22:34Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T18:22:34Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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