The One Million Global Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Study: Findings From a Large Urban Hospital

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622157
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The One Million Global Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Study: Findings From a Large Urban Hospital
Other Titles:
Health Promotion of Patients With Catheters
Author(s):
Leveille, Marygrace; Ewalt-Hughes, Lori
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Marygrace Leveille, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC, Professional Experience: Dr. Leveille is the Nurse Scientist for Baylor University Medical Center (BUMC) and also has Nursing Research responsibilities for Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) through the Office of the Chief Nursing Officer. Dr. Leveille received her Master’s in Nursing and PhD in Nursing from the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Leveille’s 25 years of nursing experience has focused on Cardiology and Cardiovascular surgery and she has practiced as an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner for 14 years in these settings. Author Summary: Currently, as a Nurse Scientist, Dr. Leveille assists nurses in conducting research projects in various stages of the research process. Baylor University Medical Center currently has over 40 nursing initiated studies in progress in which Dr. Leveille has facilitated the research process. She participated as a Research Team member for this research study.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Over a billion Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (PIVCs) are inserted each year in hospitalized patients worldwide and data on the care and management of these devices is largely unknown. However, data on the prevalence of PIVCs and their management and infection practices across countries and regions are limited. While PIVCs are deemed critical for medical care, they expose patients to bloodstream infections, endocarditis and thrombophlebitis (Bacerra, Shierley &Safdar, 2016). There are many avenues of research to be explored with intravenous catheters. Should PIVCs routinely be changed out at 72-96 hours? Are there any ramifications to having idle PIVCs? According to Keogh (2013) many PIVCs can be safely changed only when clinically indicated. In an effort to understand how PIVCs are managed, an international study, “One Million Global Catheters: PIVC worldwide Prevalence Study”, was initiated by a group of investigators in Sydney, Australia. . The worldwide study included fifty one countries with 418 participating hospitals, fifty three of which were in the United States with a total of 5048 patients (Alexandrou et al, 2015). The total number of PIVCs submitted into the One Million Global (OMG) database was 40,620. The study objectives were to assess the prevalence of PIVCs and their management practices, identify patients and PIVC characteristics, the prevalence of localized symptoms, and PIVC securement and dressing practices.

Methods:

A convenience sample of 181 medical/surgical patients were recruited and consented by bedside nurses from a large urban teaching hospital to participate in this prevalence study in March of 2015. The study received approval from the Healthcare system institutional review board. A validated data collection tool was utilized by bedside nurses who were trained in Human Subjects Protection and data collection for this study. All observational data collected was de-identified and maintained in a locked secure area. Data was then electronically sent to the study principal investigators in Sydney via a secure modality. Statistical Software (SAS version 9.1; SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC) was utilized for statistical analysis. Each site was then presented with individual findings in addition to individual countries and region findings.

Results:

The majority of the patients were 18 years and older (99.5%), and half of them are men. Eighty seven percent of PIVCs were inserted for IV fluid and IV medications orders, and the majority were inserted by IV team and nurses (99%). Ninety four percent of the PIVC sites had a borderless transparent polyurethane dressing which reportedly were clean, dry and intact (87%). The majority of PIVC site assessments were documented in patients’ charts in last 24 hours (91%) and with no clinical symptoms (88%). A small proportion of PIVC sites with blood in line (3.9%), pain/tenderness on palpation (2.8%), and bruising/dried blood around PIVC (2.8 %). PIVC site selection was usually the forearm (40%) with a 20 gauge(35%) or 22 gauge (34%), respectively.

Keywords:
Peripheral Intravenous Catheters; Research; International
Repository Posting Date:
25-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17M08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe One Million Global Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Study: Findings From a Large Urban Hospitalen_US
dc.title.alternativeHealth Promotion of Patients With Cathetersen
dc.contributor.authorLeveille, Marygraceen
dc.contributor.authorEwalt-Hughes, Lorien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMarygrace Leveille, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC, Professional Experience: Dr. Leveille is the Nurse Scientist for Baylor University Medical Center (BUMC) and also has Nursing Research responsibilities for Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) through the Office of the Chief Nursing Officer. Dr. Leveille received her Master’s in Nursing and PhD in Nursing from the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Leveille’s 25 years of nursing experience has focused on Cardiology and Cardiovascular surgery and she has practiced as an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner for 14 years in these settings. Author Summary: Currently, as a Nurse Scientist, Dr. Leveille assists nurses in conducting research projects in various stages of the research process. Baylor University Medical Center currently has over 40 nursing initiated studies in progress in which Dr. Leveille has facilitated the research process. She participated as a Research Team member for this research study.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622157-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Over a billion Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (PIVCs) are inserted each year in hospitalized patients worldwide and data on the care and management of these devices is largely unknown. However, data on the prevalence of PIVCs and their management and infection practices across countries and regions are limited. While PIVCs are deemed critical for medical care, they expose patients to bloodstream infections, endocarditis and thrombophlebitis (Bacerra, Shierley &Safdar, 2016). There are many avenues of research to be explored with intravenous catheters. Should PIVCs routinely be changed out at 72-96 hours? Are there any ramifications to having idle PIVCs? According to Keogh (2013) many PIVCs can be safely changed only when clinically indicated. In an effort to understand how PIVCs are managed, an international study, “One Million Global Catheters: PIVC worldwide Prevalence Study”, was initiated by a group of investigators in Sydney, Australia. . The worldwide study included fifty one countries with 418 participating hospitals, fifty three of which were in the United States with a total of 5048 patients (Alexandrou et al, 2015). The total number of PIVCs submitted into the One Million Global (OMG) database was 40,620. The study objectives were to assess the prevalence of PIVCs and their management practices, identify patients and PIVC characteristics, the prevalence of localized symptoms, and PIVC securement and dressing practices.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>A convenience sample of 181 medical/surgical patients were recruited and consented by bedside nurses from a large urban teaching hospital to participate in this prevalence study in March of 2015. The study received approval from the Healthcare system institutional review board. A validated data collection tool was utilized by bedside nurses who were trained in Human Subjects Protection and data collection for this study. All observational data collected was de-identified and maintained in a locked secure area. Data was then electronically sent to the study principal investigators in Sydney via a secure modality. Statistical Software (SAS version 9.1; SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC) was utilized for statistical analysis. Each site was then presented with individual findings in addition to individual countries and region findings.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The majority of the patients were 18 years and older (99.5%), and half of them are men. Eighty seven percent of PIVCs were inserted for IV fluid and IV medications orders, and the majority were inserted by IV team and nurses (99%). Ninety four percent of the PIVC sites had a borderless transparent polyurethane dressing which reportedly were clean, dry and intact (87%). The majority of PIVC site assessments were documented in patients’ charts in last 24 hours (91%) and with no clinical symptoms (88%). A small proportion of PIVC sites with blood in line (3.9%), pain/tenderness on palpation (2.8%), and bruising/dried blood around PIVC (2.8 %). PIVC site selection was usually the forearm (40%) with a 20 gauge(35%) or 22 gauge (34%), respectively.</p>en
dc.subjectPeripheral Intravenous Cathetersen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectInternationalen
dc.date.available2017-07-25T19:57:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T19:57:36Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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