Pain-Management Challenges in Rural Communities Impacted By Multi-Drug Overdoses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622159
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Pain-Management Challenges in Rural Communities Impacted By Multi-Drug Overdoses
Other Titles:
Pain-Management Strategies
Author(s):
Campbell, Cathy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Kappa
Author Details:
Cathy Campbell, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: University of Virginia, Associate Professor 2012- University of Virginia, Assistant Professor, 2005-2012 Haven Hospice, Admissions Case Manager 2011-2005 Hospice Care of DC, Director of Clinical Services 1994-1998 Author Summary: Associate Professor, University of Virginia Hospice and palliative care researcher in areas of decision-making, community education, the role of CHW, and advance care planning. She has 30 years of clinical experience of direct care and leadership and is published internationally in the hospice and palliative care literature. Currently she is a Fulbright Global Scholar 2017-2018 in South Africa and Thailand. Her project focuses on describing the role of CHWS in palliative care in rural communities.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify themes that describe pain management challenges experienced by nurses in a rural Appalachian area of the United States (US) that has been negatively impacted by opioid overdoses. Internationally pain management interventions by nurses includes pain assessment, teaching about pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities, and the evaluation of treatment effectiveness (Doorenbos, Jansen, Oakes & Wilson, 2013). However, pre-licensure nursing and continuing education curricula do not contain content on how to effectively manage pain in people who concurrently are living with substance abuse or addiction to alcohol or drugs (Hamilton & Watson, 2014). Rural communities in the Appalachian area of the United States have been experiencing an epidemic of accidental overdoses of opioids (Campbell, Boyer, Rovnyak & Campbell, 2012, Fetzer, 2015). Health care providers across settings of care such as the emergency department, medical-surgical acute care unit, or in labor and delivery encounter people who not only have a current or past history of substance abuse, but may also be experiencing pain. Yet we have few studies that describe the challenges that nurses practicing in communities impacted by the health care crisis of accidental overdoses are facing in pain management their practice, and therefore the literature lacks the evidence base to guide nursing practice during this epidemic.

Methods: A secondary data analysis of findings from a study of pain management learning needs Campbell, Boyer, Rovnyak, & Campbell, 2012) was conducted to identify themes that describe pain management challenges experienced by nurses in rural Appalachia. In the original study 2,136 surveys were mailed to registered nurses in seven counties in rural Appalachia and 295 surveys were returned, for a 13.8% return rate. Respondents were 98% Caucasian, 47%.1 had a BSN or higher degree, 52.9% ADN/Diploma. We received sixty-one different narrative responses to two open-ended questions on the survey completed by the participants in the primary study. They were asked to identify additional learning needs and to tell a narrative about challenges related to pain management from their clinical practice.

Thematic analysis was used to analyze the narrative responses in data.

Results:  In the original study 2,136 surveys were mailed to registered nurses in seven counties in rural Appalachia and 295 surveys were returned, for a 13.8% return rate. Respondents were 98% Caucasian, 47%.1 had a BSN or higher degree, 52.9% ADN/Diploma. We received sixty-one different narrative responses to two open-ended questions on the survey completed by the participants in the primary study.

Data analysis revealed three themes related to additional learning needs: pain management of people with addictions (including babies born with neonatal alcohol syndrome), pain management in people with chronic pain (back pain, neuropathy, and arthritis), and alternative and complementary therapies for pain management. Four major themes from the narratives about pain management challenges were identified: managing pain in people with current or past history of abuse to opioids and alcohol; managing pain in people with history of anxiety, depression and schizophrenia, poor nurse-physician collaboration, and pain management at end of life.

Conclusion:

Implications for nursing education for pre-licensure students and continuing education for licensed nurses will include collaborating with expert nursing colleagues in psychiatric-mental health nursing to develop educational sessions education with topics such as pain management in people who have history of substance abuse and other mental health issues. Palliative care providers can consult with clinical partners on effective treatments to manage chronic pain. Future research should also include studies to explore how interprofessional collaboration in may improve pain management outcomes.

Keywords:
education; nursing; pain
Repository Posting Date:
25-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17M11
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePain-Management Challenges in Rural Communities Impacted By Multi-Drug Overdosesen_US
dc.title.alternativePain-Management Strategiesen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Cathyen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Kappaen
dc.author.detailsCathy Campbell, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: University of Virginia, Associate Professor 2012- University of Virginia, Assistant Professor, 2005-2012 Haven Hospice, Admissions Case Manager 2011-2005 Hospice Care of DC, Director of Clinical Services 1994-1998 Author Summary: Associate Professor, University of Virginia Hospice and palliative care researcher in areas of decision-making, community education, the role of CHW, and advance care planning. She has 30 years of clinical experience of direct care and leadership and is published internationally in the hospice and palliative care literature. Currently she is a Fulbright Global Scholar 2017-2018 in South Africa and Thailand. Her project focuses on describing the role of CHWS in palliative care in rural communities.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622159-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The purpose of this study is to identify themes that describe pain management challenges experienced by nurses in a rural Appalachian area of the United States (US) that has been negatively impacted by opioid overdoses. Internationally pain management interventions by nurses includes pain assessment, teaching about pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities, and the evaluation of treatment effectiveness (Doorenbos, Jansen, Oakes & Wilson, 2013). However, pre-licensure nursing and continuing education curricula do not contain content on how to effectively manage pain in people who concurrently are living with substance abuse or addiction to alcohol or drugs (Hamilton & Watson, 2014). Rural communities in the Appalachian area of the United States have been experiencing an epidemic of accidental overdoses of opioids (Campbell, Boyer, Rovnyak & Campbell, 2012, Fetzer, 2015). Health care providers across settings of care such as the emergency department, medical-surgical acute care unit, or in labor and delivery encounter people who not only have a current or past history of substance abuse, but may also be experiencing pain. Yet we have few studies that describe the challenges that nurses practicing in communities impacted by the health care crisis of accidental overdoses are facing in pain management their practice, and therefore the literature lacks the evidence base to guide nursing practice during this epidemic.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A secondary data analysis of findings from a study of pain management learning needs Campbell, Boyer, Rovnyak, & Campbell, 2012) was conducted to identify themes that describe pain management challenges experienced by nurses in rural Appalachia. In the original study 2,136 surveys were mailed to registered nurses in seven counties in rural Appalachia and 295 surveys<strong> </strong>were returned, for a 13.8% return rate. Respondents were 98% Caucasian, 47%.1 had a BSN or higher degree, 52.9% ADN/Diploma. We received sixty-one different narrative responses to two open-ended questions on the survey completed by the participants in the primary study. They were asked to identify additional learning needs and to tell a narrative about challenges related to pain management from their clinical practice.</p> <p>Thematic analysis was used to analyze the narrative responses in data.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> In the original study 2,136 surveys were mailed to registered nurses in seven counties in rural Appalachia and 295 surveys<strong> </strong>were returned, for a 13.8% return rate. Respondents were 98% Caucasian, 47%.1 had a BSN or higher degree, 52.9% ADN/Diploma. We received sixty-one different narrative responses to two open-ended questions on the survey completed by the participants in the primary study.</p> <p>Data analysis revealed three themes related to additional learning needs: pain management of people with addictions (including babies born with neonatal alcohol syndrome), pain management in people with chronic pain (back pain, neuropathy, and arthritis), and alternative and complementary therapies for pain management. Four major themes from the narratives about pain management challenges were identified: managing pain in people with current or past history of abuse to opioids and alcohol; managing pain in people with history of anxiety, depression and schizophrenia, poor nurse-physician collaboration, and pain management at end of life.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Implications for nursing education for pre-licensure students and continuing education for licensed nurses will include collaborating with expert nursing colleagues in psychiatric-mental health nursing to develop educational sessions education with topics such as pain management in people who have history of substance abuse and other mental health issues. Palliative care providers can consult with clinical partners on effective treatments to manage chronic pain. Future research should also include studies to explore how interprofessional collaboration in may improve pain management outcomes.</p>en
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subjectpainen
dc.date.available2017-07-25T20:11:27Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T20:11:27Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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