Evidence-Based Value and Availability of Self-Help Groups for Mood Disorders in U.S. and Ireland

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622201
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Evidence-Based Value and Availability of Self-Help Groups for Mood Disorders in U.S. and Ireland
Other Titles:
Global Mental Health Promotion
Author(s):
Markley, Valerie N.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Valerie N. Markley, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN, Professional Experience: Indiana University School of Nursing (Assistant Professor, 1971-2010) teaching psychiatric mental health nursing, communication skills Adult and Child Health, Advance Practice Psychiatric nurse, as a locum tenens, February through July 2016. Corizon Health, Advance practice psychiatric nurse, May 2014-February 2015 at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility. US Army Reserves Nurse Corps 55th Med Co., CSC (LTC, 1984- 2005) Indiana Wesleyan University 2011-present, (Adjunct Faculty) teaching RN to BSN students Professional Organizations American Nurses Associations (1971-present) American Psychiatric Nurses Association (1996-present) Sigma Theta Tau International Community Organizations Mental Health America (1971-present) very active at state and local level (board and committees) Serve as facilitator for self-help support groups Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance Schizophrenics Anonymous s Suicide Prevention Coalition National Alliance on Mental Illness, Family to Family instructor Governor’s Commission on Mental Health and Addictions (2003-2013) Indiana Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health,immediate past chair Author Summary: I worked in a community mental health center and in a maximum security prison as an advanced practice nurse the past two years. I just completed three months as an APN on the Navajo Reservation in Crownpoint, NM. My previous 39 years were in academia at Indiana University School of Nursing. I still work as an adjunct professor. I also facilitate two biweekly self-help support groups: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance and Schizophrenics Anonymous.
Abstract:

Research validates a three-pronged approach as best practice for the treatment of mood disorders: medication (when warranted), therapy, and self-help. Peer support groups are a major option for self-help. Millions of individuals in the U.S. and around the world, including Ireland, are currently using and benefitting from self-help groups. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of such groups both short-term and long-term. Self-help groups are made up of individuals sharing similar problems and life situations. They provide emotional support to each other, share means of coping, learn new strategies for improvement, and suggest new resources and information on available providers. They share insights gained from first-hand experiences and promote hope and empowerment. Such groups are self-governed, cost-free, and readily available for every major disorder listed by the World Health Organization including both physical and emotional problems, habits and addictions, bereavement, and parenting. There are also groups for the significant others and supporters of those with the disorders. These groups are increasingly recognized as viable and efficient means of supplementing and extending typical care components. In addition, as it says in the AA Big Book (AA, 2002), in order to help yourself, you have to help others.

The World Health Organization (WHO) ranks depression (unipolar) as the fourth leading cause of disease burden, accounting for 4.4% of total DALY’s--disability-adjusted life-years (WHO, 2012). Authors conclude from this data that the burden of depression worldwide represents a major public health problem affecting clients and society at large. They note that although variations occur, trends and patterns of illness tend to be very similar throughout the world. Recent statistics from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) Study report a 12-month prevalence for all mood disorders in U.S. adults between the ages of 18-65 as 9.5% and having a lifetime prevalence of 20.8% (NIMH, 2011). The total economic impact of mood disorders is extreme and places an enormous burden on the health care industry. Millions of depressed individuals never receive treatment. Health care providers could refer their clients to self-help support groups as an additional resource for care.

This presentation will present evidence to support an understanding of and value for self-help support groups for mood disorders and compare and contrast self-help group resources for mood disorders available in the U.S. and Ireland, both Northern and Southern Ireland.

Keywords:
Mood disorders; Resources and websites for mood disorders in U.S. and Ireland; Self-help support groups
Repository Posting Date:
26-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
26-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17P01
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEvidence-Based Value and Availability of Self-Help Groups for Mood Disorders in U.S. and Irelanden_US
dc.title.alternativeGlobal Mental Health Promotionen
dc.contributor.authorMarkley, Valerie N.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsValerie N. Markley, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN, Professional Experience: Indiana University School of Nursing (Assistant Professor, 1971-2010) teaching psychiatric mental health nursing, communication skills Adult and Child Health, Advance Practice Psychiatric nurse, as a locum tenens, February through July 2016. Corizon Health, Advance practice psychiatric nurse, May 2014-February 2015 at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility. US Army Reserves Nurse Corps 55th Med Co., CSC (LTC, 1984- 2005) Indiana Wesleyan University 2011-present, (Adjunct Faculty) teaching RN to BSN students Professional Organizations American Nurses Associations (1971-present) American Psychiatric Nurses Association (1996-present) Sigma Theta Tau International Community Organizations Mental Health America (1971-present) very active at state and local level (board and committees) Serve as facilitator for self-help support groups Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance Schizophrenics Anonymous s Suicide Prevention Coalition National Alliance on Mental Illness, Family to Family instructor Governor’s Commission on Mental Health and Addictions (2003-2013) Indiana Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health,immediate past chair Author Summary: I worked in a community mental health center and in a maximum security prison as an advanced practice nurse the past two years. I just completed three months as an APN on the Navajo Reservation in Crownpoint, NM. My previous 39 years were in academia at Indiana University School of Nursing. I still work as an adjunct professor. I also facilitate two biweekly self-help support groups: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance and Schizophrenics Anonymous.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622201-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>Research validates a three-pronged approach as best practice for the treatment of mood disorders: medication (when warranted), therapy, and self-help. Peer support groups are a major option for self-help. Millions of individuals in the U.S. and around the world, including Ireland, are currently using and benefitting from self-help groups. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of such groups both short-term and long-term. Self-help groups are made up of individuals sharing similar problems and life situations. They provide emotional support to each other, share means of coping, learn new strategies for improvement, and suggest new resources and information on available providers. They share insights gained from first-hand experiences and promote hope and empowerment. Such groups are self-governed, cost-free, and readily available for every major disorder listed by the World Health Organization including both physical and emotional problems, habits and addictions, bereavement, and parenting. There are also groups for the significant others and supporters of those with the disorders. These groups are increasingly recognized as viable and efficient means of supplementing and extending typical care components. In addition, as it says in the AA Big Book (AA, 2002), in order to help yourself, you have to help others.</span></p> <p>The World Health Organization (WHO) ranks depression (unipolar) as the fourth leading cause of disease burden, accounting for 4.4% of total DALY’s--disability-adjusted life-years (WHO, 2012). Authors conclude from this data that the burden of depression worldwide represents a major public health problem affecting clients and society at large. They note that although variations occur, trends and patterns of illness tend to be very similar throughout the world. Recent statistics from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) Study report a 12-month prevalence for all mood disorders in U.S. adults between the ages of 18-65 as 9.5% and having a lifetime prevalence of 20.8% (NIMH, 2011). The total economic impact of mood disorders is extreme and places an enormous burden on the health care industry. Millions of depressed individuals never receive treatment. Health care providers could refer their clients to self-help support groups as an additional resource for care.</p> <p>This presentation will present evidence to support an understanding of and value for self-help support groups for mood disorders and compare and contrast self-help group resources for mood disorders available in the U.S. and Ireland, both Northern and Southern Ireland.</p>en
dc.subjectMood disordersen
dc.subjectResources and websites for mood disorders in U.S. and Irelanden
dc.subjectSelf-help support groupsen
dc.date.available2017-07-26T14:49:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-26-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-26T14:49:55Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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