Influence of Nurse Social Networks on Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Results of an Exploratory Study

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622234
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Influence of Nurse Social Networks on Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Results of an Exploratory Study
Other Titles:
Promoting Evidence-Based Practice
Author(s):
Solomons, Nan M.; Spross, Judith A.; Lamb, Gerri
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Nan M. Solomons, PhD - Online College of Graduate and Professional Studies, University of New England, Portland, ME, USA; Judith A. Spross, PhD - School of Nursing, University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME, USA; Gerri Lamb, PhD - College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
Abstract:

The EBP literature suggests that nurses are more likely to turn to each other for answers to clinical questions. This study suggested that understanding nurses’ relationships with each other and their social networks may lead to more effective strategies for improving the uptake of evidence in clinical practice.

Keywords:
EBP/evidence-based practice; Interprofessional Communication Quality and Social Network Theory; Research and Methods
Repository Posting Date:
26-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
26-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17R03
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleInfluence of Nurse Social Networks on Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Results of an Exploratory Studyen_US
dc.title.alternativePromoting Evidence-Based Practiceen
dc.contributor.authorSolomons, Nan M.en
dc.contributor.authorSpross, Judith A.en
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Gerrien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsNan M. Solomons, PhD - Online College of Graduate and Professional Studies, University of New England, Portland, ME, USA; Judith A. Spross, PhD - School of Nursing, University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME, USA; Gerri Lamb, PhD - College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USAen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622234-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The EBP literature suggests that nurses are more likely to turn to each other for answers to clinical questions. This study suggested that understanding nurses’ relationships with each other and their social networks may lead to more effective strategies for improving the uptake of evidence in clinical practice.</span></p>en
dc.subjectEBP/evidence-based practiceen
dc.subjectInterprofessional Communication Quality and Social Network Theoryen
dc.subjectResearch and Methodsen
dc.date.available2017-07-26T18:46:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-26-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-26T18:46:16Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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