The Relationship of Conscience and Ethical Climate Among Registered Nurses in the Acute Care Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622509
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
The Relationship of Conscience and Ethical Climate Among Registered Nurses in the Acute Care Environment
Author(s):
Kyzar, Theresa A.
Additional Author Information:
Theresa A. Kyzar, PhD, RN
Advisors:
Moore, Julia; Barnard, Darleen; Zerwekh, Jason
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

Although there has been extensive research on factors contributing to moral distress, burnout, and turnover intentions in the nursing profession, there has been limited research on the relationship of conscience and ethical climate. Both the ethical climate theory and moral distress theory were utilized to guide the implementation of this study. A predictive correlational design was utilized to determine the relationship between the variables defined as perceptions of conscience, hospital ethical climate and stress of conscience. A purposive, non-probability-based sampling of 193 registered nurses throughout the state of Louisiana was surveyed using a web-based survey instrument. The results of this study
verified a significant relationship exists between perceptions of conscience and hospital climate. An additional relationship was established between hospital ethical climate and stress of conscience. There was no relationship found between nursing demographics and job characteristics, however. The use of conscience serves as an important guide for the nurse’s moral agency. The findings of this study indicate that nurses view conscience as
an asset and authority and perceptions of conscience contribute to the ethical climate of nursing units. Factors indicating a poor ethical climate can lead to a stress of conscience in nurses. Based on the results of this study, a caring, supportive, interdisciplinary teambased environment is important for the nurse to act with moral courage during ethically difficult patient-care situations.

Keywords:
Conscience; ethical climate; moral distress theory
CINAHL Headings:
Ethics, Nursing; Ethics Theory; Morals; Acute Care; Registered Nurses
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. ProQuest document ID: 10244753. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-08-08T17:05:59Z
Date of Publication:
2017-08-08

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Juliaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarnard, Darleenen
dc.contributor.advisorZerwekh, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorKyzar, Theresa A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T17:05:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-08T17:05:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-08-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622509-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. ProQuest document ID: 10244753. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Although there has been extensive research on factors contributing to moral distress, burnout, and turnover intentions in the nursing profession, there has been limited research on the relationship of conscience and ethical climate. Both the ethical climate theory and moral distress theory were utilized to guide the implementation of this study. A predictive correlational design was utilized to determine the relationship between the variables defined as perceptions of conscience, hospital ethical climate and stress of conscience. A purposive, non-probability-based sampling of 193 registered nurses throughout the state of Louisiana was surveyed using a web-based survey instrument. The results of this study<br />verified a significant relationship exists between perceptions of conscience and hospital climate. An additional relationship was established between hospital ethical climate and stress of conscience. There was no relationship found between nursing demographics and job characteristics, however. The use of conscience serves as an important guide for the nurse’s moral agency. The findings of this study indicate that nurses view conscience as<br />an asset and authority and perceptions of conscience contribute to the ethical climate of nursing units. Factors indicating a poor ethical climate can lead to a stress of conscience in nurses. Based on the results of this study, a caring, supportive, interdisciplinary teambased environment is important for the nurse to act with moral courage during ethically difficult patient-care situations.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectConscienceen
dc.subjectethical climateen
dc.subjectmoral distress theoryen
dc.titleThe Relationship of Conscience and Ethical Climate Among Registered Nurses in the Acute Care Environmenten_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsTheresa A. Kyzar, PhD, RNen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlEthics, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlEthics Theoryen
dc.subject.cinahlMoralsen
dc.subject.cinahlAcute Careen
dc.subject.cinahlRegistered Nursesen
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