2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622512
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Health Literacy of Diabetics at a Free Community Health Clinic
Author(s):
Catacutan, Fay Patsy T.; Strietelmeier, Laura E.; Doumtsop, Katy A.; Walsh, Mary Eileen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Fay Patsy T. Catacutan, BS; Laura E. Strietelmeier, MDiv, BS; Katy A. Doumtsop, BS; Mary Eileen Walsh, PhD, MSN, BSN -- College of Nursing, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA
Abstract:

Background: According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, only 12% of U.S. adults have proficient health literacy and over 77 million people have difficulty with common health related tasks, including following directions on a prescription drug label. Even with extensive research discoveries related to the pathology of diabetes, the complications of the disease state continue to rise. In diabetes, health literacy includes knowledge of the disease, self-care behaviors, and glycemic control. Individuals with inadequate health literacy levels have poorer health outcomes regardless of illness, social and economic status, education, gender, and age. Individuals with diabetes who attend a free community health clinic may have limited resources and education, which further compound their health outcomes.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess health literacy of individuals with diabetes who attend a free community health clinic.

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Orem’s Self-Care Deficit Theory was used as the guiding framework. Self-care is an essential component to managing diabetes. Nurses need to educate individuals on self-care practices in accordance with their health literacy level.

Methods: The sample consisted of individuals who attend a free community health clinic ages 18 years and older who self-identify as having been diagnosed with diabetes. Individuals received an overview of the study and provided informed consent. Participants answered demographic and health questions and responded to 3 health literacy questions using a Likert scale.

Results: To date, 29 type 2 and 2 type 1 diabetics (21 females, 10 males) ages 27-84 years, 71% (22) white, 16% (5) Latino/Hispanic, and 13% (4) black/African American completed the study. Of these 58% had more than high school education and 41.9% were unemployed. Health literacy questions indicated that 38.1% were not at all confident in filling out medical forms by themselves, 35.5% had problems understanding written information, and 23.8% required help to read hospital materials.

Limitations: This was a convenience sample of a single community health clinic with unequal representation by race and gender.

Conclusions: Preliminary findings suggest that health literacy level should be considered when providing self-care education to diabetics. Written health care information should be appropriate to the identified health literacy level, discussed with the individual and other support care person. Comprehension of information should be reassessed.

Keywords:
community health clinics; diabetic needs; health literacy
Repository Posting Date:
15-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
15-Aug-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17PST50
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleHealth Literacy of Diabetics at a Free Community Health Clinicen_US
dc.contributor.authorCatacutan, Fay Patsy T.en
dc.contributor.authorStrietelmeier, Laura E.en
dc.contributor.authorDoumtsop, Katy A.en
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Mary Eileenen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsFay Patsy T. Catacutan, BS; Laura E. Strietelmeier, MDiv, BS; Katy A. Doumtsop, BS; Mary Eileen Walsh, PhD, MSN, BSN -- College of Nursing, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USAen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622512-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong><span>According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, only 12% of U.S. adults have proficient health literacy and over 77 million people have difficulty with common health related tasks, including following directions on a prescription drug label. Even with extensive research discoveries related to the pathology of diabetes, the complications of the disease state continue to rise. In diabetes, health literacy includes knowledge of the disease, self-care behaviors, and glycemic control. Individuals with inadequate health literacy levels have poorer health outcomes regardless of illness, social and economic status, education, gender, and age. Individuals with diabetes who attend a free community health clinic may have limited resources and education, which further compound their health outcomes.</span></p> <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The purpose of this study was to assess health literacy of individuals with diabetes who attend a free community health clinic.</p> <p><strong>Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: </strong>Orem’s Self-Care Deficit Theory was used as the guiding framework. Self-care is an essential component to managing diabetes. Nurses need to educate individuals on self-care practices in accordance with their health literacy level.<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>The sample consisted of individuals who attend a free community health clinic ages 18 years and older who self-identify as having been diagnosed with diabetes. Individuals received an overview of the study and provided informed consent. Participants answered demographic and health questions and responded to 3 health literacy questions using a Likert scale.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>To date, 29 type 2 and 2 type 1 diabetics (21 females, 10 males) ages 27-84 years, 71% (22) white, 16% (5) Latino/Hispanic, and 13% (4) black/African American completed the study. Of these 58% had more than high school education and 41.9% were unemployed. Health literacy questions indicated that 38.1% were not at all confident in filling out medical forms by themselves, 35.5% had problems understanding written information, and 23.8% required help to read hospital materials.</p> <p><strong>Limitations: </strong>This was a convenience sample of a single community health clinic with unequal representation by race and gender.<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>Preliminary findings suggest that health literacy level should be considered when providing self-care education to diabetics. Written health care information should be appropriate to the identified health literacy level, discussed with the individual and other support care person. Comprehension of information should be reassessed.</p>en
dc.subjectcommunity health clinicsen
dc.subjectdiabetic needsen
dc.subjecthealth literacyen
dc.date.available2017-08-15T16:36:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-15-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-15T16:36:48Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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