Exploration of a Racially Diverse Sample of Nursing Students Satisfaction, Self-efficacy, and Perceptions of Simulation Using Racially Diverse Manikins

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622521
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Exploration of a Racially Diverse Sample of Nursing Students Satisfaction, Self-efficacy, and Perceptions of Simulation Using Racially Diverse Manikins
Author(s):
Graham, Crystal; Foronda, Cynthia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Crystal Graham, PhD, RN, CHSE; Cynthia Foronda, PhD, RN, CNE, CHSE, ANEF
Abstract:

Background: The 2014 NCSBN study identified that the largest number of minority students were randomized to and withdrew from the 50% simulation group. These findings are significant as there is a paucity of research examining if race is a demographic characteristic that influences outcomes in simulation.

Objective: The study purpose was to explore potential trends of differences in self-efficacy, satisfaction, and perceptions of a racially diverse sample of students using racially diverse manikins in simulation.

Methods: An explanatory mixed methods design using a comparative group approach and focus groups was used in order to more deeply understand the students’ experiences.

Results: Change in self-efficacy scores (SES) were statistically significant for the entire sample (p < .001). There were no significant differences in change in SES by student or manikin race. Overall, satisfaction scores were not statistically significant. Qualitative findings identified that multiple level groups in simulation lessened the perceived racial divide and that the presence of minority faculty created a sense of belongingness for the minority participants. In addition, qualitative findings identified that the use of diverse manikins provided students with the opportunity to practice caring for patients that are representative of the current population.

Conclusion: Results of this study highlight the need for further research that will determine if a relationship exists between race, of both students and manikins, as a demographic characteristic and nursing student outcomes. In addition, further research is needed to determine if there is a perceived stereotype threat of participants that influences outcomes in simulation.

Keywords:
simulation; racially diverse; satisfaction; self-efficacy
Repository Posting Date:
17-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Aug-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
INACSL Conference 2017
Conference Host:
INACSL
Conference Location:
Washington DC
Description:
INACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleExploration of a Racially Diverse Sample of Nursing Students Satisfaction, Self-efficacy, and Perceptions of Simulation Using Racially Diverse Manikinsen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Crystalen
dc.contributor.authorForonda, Cynthiaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCrystal Graham, PhD, RN, CHSE; Cynthia Foronda, PhD, RN, CNE, CHSE, ANEFen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622521-
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: The 2014 NCSBN study identified that the largest number of minority students were randomized to and withdrew from the 50% simulation group. These findings are significant as there is a paucity of research examining if race is a demographic characteristic that influences outcomes in simulation.</p> <p>Objective: The study purpose was to explore potential trends of differences in self-efficacy, satisfaction, and perceptions of a racially diverse sample of students using racially diverse manikins in simulation.</p> <p>Methods: An explanatory mixed methods design using a comparative group approach and focus groups was used in order to more deeply understand the students&rsquo; experiences.</p> <p>Results: Change in self-efficacy scores (SES) were statistically significant for the entire sample (p &lt; .001). There were no significant differences in change in SES by student or manikin race. Overall, satisfaction scores were not statistically significant. Qualitative findings identified that multiple level groups in simulation lessened the perceived racial divide and that the presence of minority faculty created a sense of belongingness for the minority participants. In addition, qualitative findings identified that the use of diverse manikins provided students with the opportunity to practice caring for patients that are representative of the current population.</p> <p>Conclusion: Results of this study highlight the need for further research that will determine if a relationship exists between race, of both students and manikins, as a demographic characteristic and nursing student outcomes. In addition, further research is needed to determine if there is a perceived stereotype threat of participants that influences outcomes in simulation.</p>en
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectracially diverseen
dc.subjectsatisfactionen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.date.available2017-08-17T20:25:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T20:25:15Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameINACSL Conference 2017en
dc.conference.hostINACSLen
dc.conference.locationWashington DCen
dc.descriptionINACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DCen
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