Student Learning Outcomes and Perceptions of Using vSIM for Nursing™: A Mixed-Methods Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622526
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Student Learning Outcomes and Perceptions of Using vSIM for Nursing™: A Mixed-Methods Study
Author(s):
Foronda, Cynthia; Swoboda, Sandra; Sullivan, Nancy; Kamau, Emma; Hudson, Krysia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Cynthia Foronda, PHD, RN, CNE, CHSE, ANEF; Sandra Swoboda, RN, MS, FCCM; Nancy Sullivan, DNP, RN; Emma Kamau, MSN, CVRN, BS; Krysia Hudson, DNP, RN, BC
Abstract:

Background: Virtual simulation is being trialed in schools of nursing with limited evidence about its impact on student learning outcomes.

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore pre-licensure students’ learning outcomes and perceptions of using vSim for Nursing™.

Methods: Ninety-nine pre-licensure students performed virtual simulations with a patient suffering anaphylaxis and a patient suffering cardiac arrest. Students provided feedback through surveys after the simulations. The study employed a mixed methods design using descriptive statistics and content analysis.

Results: Quantitative data suggested that the majority of students found the content relevant (89%) and would recommend the virtual simulation for future use (78%). Qualitative data revealed three themes of learning outcomes: 1) Assessment, 2) Prioritization, and 3) Emergency Management. The most common interventions students indicated performing were medication administration (52%) and respiratory interventions (44%). Students felt virtual simulation would be best used in the curriculum as clinical makeup for missed hours (51%) and enhancing lecture (29%).

Conclusions: Nurse educators should consider what learning outcomes virtual simulation fosters and strategically place the exercises within the curriculum. Aligning the application of virtual simulation with student learning preferences may enhance the learning experience.

Keywords:
virtual simulation; learning outcomes
Repository Posting Date:
17-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Aug-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
INACSL Conference 2017
Conference Host:
INACSL
Conference Location:
Washington DC
Description:
INACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleStudent Learning Outcomes and Perceptions of Using vSIM for Nursing™: A Mixed-Methods Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorForonda, Cynthiaen
dc.contributor.authorSwoboda, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorKamau, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Krysiaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsCynthia Foronda, PHD, RN, CNE, CHSE, ANEF; Sandra Swoboda, RN, MS, FCCM; Nancy Sullivan, DNP, RN; Emma Kamau, MSN, CVRN, BS; Krysia Hudson, DNP, RN, BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622526-
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Virtual simulation is being trialed in schools of nursing with limited evidence about its impact on student learning outcomes.</p> <p>Aim: The aim of this study was to explore pre-licensure students&rsquo; learning outcomes and perceptions of using vSim for Nursing&trade;.</p> <p>Methods: Ninety-nine pre-licensure students performed virtual simulations with a patient suffering anaphylaxis and a patient suffering cardiac arrest. Students provided feedback through surveys after the simulations. The study employed a mixed methods design using descriptive statistics and content analysis.</p> <p>Results: Quantitative data suggested that the majority of students found the content relevant (89%) and would recommend the virtual simulation for future use (78%). Qualitative data revealed three themes of learning outcomes: 1) Assessment, 2) Prioritization, and 3) Emergency Management. The most common interventions students indicated performing were medication administration (52%) and respiratory interventions (44%). Students felt virtual simulation would be best used in the curriculum as clinical makeup for missed hours (51%) and enhancing lecture (29%).</p> <p>Conclusions: Nurse educators should consider what learning outcomes virtual simulation fosters and strategically place the exercises within the curriculum. Aligning the application of virtual simulation with student learning preferences may enhance the learning experience.</p>en
dc.subjectvirtual simulationen
dc.subjectlearning outcomesen
dc.date.available2017-08-17T20:25:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T20:25:59Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameINACSL Conference 2017en
dc.conference.hostINACSLen
dc.conference.locationWashington DCen
dc.descriptionINACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DCen
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