2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622536
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Evaluating Facilitator Competency: Using A Rubric To Identify Faculty Development Needs
Author(s):
Leighton, Kim; Mudra, Vickie; Gilbert, Gregory
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Kim Leighton, Adtalem Global Education; Vickie Mudra, Chamberlain College of Nursing, Chamberlain University; Gregory Gilbert, Adtalem Global Education
Abstract:

There are no tools available to objectively evaluate simulation facilitators in their complete role. In light of the findings of the NCSBN simulation study (Hayden, et al., 2014), many nursing programs will increase the use of simulation as a teaching strategy. As more hours are used in this modality, it is vital that educators are competent in their role. The need for faculty development is underscored in the simulation guidelines for leadership and faculty (Alexander et al., 2015), as well as in the NLN’s Essential Vision for Teaching Nursing Care with Simulation (2015).

 

The Facilitator Competency Rubric (FCR) was designed to help validate facilitator competence as well as identify opportunities for facilitator development. Validity was established by expert panel of simulation educators. Reliability was very high with a coefficient alpha of .96 (95% CI: .96-.97). The tool is suitable for distinguishing between novice/advanced beginner, competent, and proficient/expert.

 

This presentation will provide the learners with examples of how to use and interpret the FCR. Following a brief overview of the major concepts and their components, the audience will practice using the tool to evaluate examples of facilitator behaviors to determine level of competency, which will then be used to identify possible faculty development opportunities.

Keywords:
simulation; simulation facilitator competency; faculty needs
Repository Posting Date:
17-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Aug-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
INACSL Conference 2017
Conference Host:
INACSL
Conference Location:
Washington DC
Description:
INACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEvaluating Facilitator Competency: Using A Rubric To Identify Faculty Development Needsen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeighton, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorMudra, Vickieen
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Gregoryen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsKim Leighton, Adtalem Global Education; Vickie Mudra, Chamberlain College of Nursing, Chamberlain University; Gregory Gilbert, Adtalem Global Educationen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622536-
dc.description.abstract<p>There are no tools available to objectively evaluate simulation facilitators in their complete role. In light of the findings of the NCSBN simulation study (Hayden, et al., 2014), many nursing programs will increase the use of simulation as a teaching strategy. As more hours are used in this modality, it is vital that educators are competent in their role. The need for faculty development is underscored in the simulation guidelines for leadership and faculty (Alexander et al., 2015), as well as in the NLN&rsquo;s Essential Vision for Teaching Nursing Care with Simulation (2015).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Facilitator Competency Rubric (FCR) was designed to help validate facilitator competence as well as identify opportunities for facilitator development. Validity was established by expert panel of simulation educators. Reliability was very high with a coefficient alpha of .96 (95% CI: .96-.97). The tool is suitable for distinguishing between novice/advanced beginner, competent, and proficient/expert.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This presentation will provide the learners with examples of how to use and interpret the FCR. Following a brief overview of the major concepts and their components, the audience will practice using the tool to evaluate examples of facilitator behaviors to determine level of competency, which will then be used to identify possible faculty development opportunities.</p>en
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectsimulation facilitator competencyen
dc.subjectfaculty needsen
dc.date.available2017-08-17T20:27:31Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T20:27:31Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameINACSL Conference 2017en
dc.conference.hostINACSLen
dc.conference.locationWashington DCen
dc.descriptionINACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DCen
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