2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622542
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Communication in a Palliative Care Setting: The Use of Shadow Box as a Strategy
Author(s):
Turner, Sufia; Harder, Nicole
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Sufia Turner, RN, BN; Nicole Harder, RN, PhD
Abstract:

Communicating with palliative patients and families is a fundamental yet difficult skill for nursing students to acquire. While many nursing programs didactically instruct palliative theory, actual hands on application comes with challenges. Gillett, O’Neill and Bloomfield (2016) found intrinsic and extrinsic factors were contributing to student’s inability to communicate effectively with patients and families. Intrinsic factors were those such as a lack of self-confidence and discomfort with the emotional aspect of the communication. Whereas extrinsic issues could be nurses in the field barring students from caring for palliative patients as a way to mitigate how and what is said to patients and families during such a vulnerable time. As clinical palliative care placements are becoming more difficult to find, opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and skills within the context of palliative care communication are limited (Bloomfield, O’Neill & Gillett, 2015). 



In order to assist students with gaining confidence and learning what to say in these difficult and oftentimes emotional situations, we created simulation with high psychological fidelity for paediatric and adult patients. We termed these as “Shadow Box” simulation based experiences. This technique utilized video and field experts to allow for students to both simulate what to say as well as watch a demonstration by an expert of effective palliative communication. This presentation will provide an overview of the “Shadow Box” strategy, demonstrate the use of the SBE, and provide some initial feedback we received from our students.

Keywords:
simulation; shadow box; communication; palliative care
Repository Posting Date:
17-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Aug-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
INACSL Conference 2017
Conference Host:
INACSL
Conference Location:
Washington DC
Description:
INACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleCommunication in a Palliative Care Setting: The Use of Shadow Box as a Strategy
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Sufiaen
dc.contributor.authorHarder, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsSufia Turner, RN, BN; Nicole Harder, RN, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622542-
dc.description.abstract<p>Communicating with palliative patients and families is a fundamental yet difficult skill for nursing students to acquire. While many nursing programs didactically instruct palliative theory, actual hands on application comes with challenges. Gillett, O&rsquo;Neill and Bloomfield (2016) found intrinsic and extrinsic factors were contributing to student&rsquo;s inability to communicate effectively with patients and families. Intrinsic factors were those such as a lack of self-confidence and discomfort with the emotional aspect of the communication. Whereas extrinsic issues could be nurses in the field barring students from caring for palliative patients as a way to mitigate how and what is said to patients and families during such a vulnerable time. As clinical palliative care placements are becoming more difficult to find, opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and skills within the context of palliative care communication are limited (Bloomfield, O&rsquo;Neill &amp; Gillett, 2015). &amp;#x0A;</p> <p><br />In order to assist students with gaining confidence and learning what to say in these difficult and oftentimes emotional situations, we created simulation with high psychological fidelity for paediatric and adult patients. We termed these as &ldquo;Shadow Box&rdquo; simulation based experiences. This technique utilized video and field experts to allow for students to both simulate what to say as well as watch a demonstration by an expert of effective palliative communication. This presentation will provide an overview of the &ldquo;Shadow Box&rdquo; strategy, demonstrate the use of the SBE, and provide some initial feedback we received from our students.</p>en
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectshadow boxen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectpalliative careen
dc.date.available2017-08-17T20:28:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T20:28:24Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameINACSL Conference 2017en
dc.conference.hostINACSLen
dc.conference.locationWashington DCen
dc.descriptionINACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DCen
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