2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622545
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Failure to Rescue: How Simulation Can Help Transition to Practice
Author(s):
Beroz, Sabrina; Schneidereith, Tonya; Sullivan, Nancy; Farina, Crystel L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Sabrina Beroz, DNP, RN, CHSE; Tonya Schneidereith PhD, CRNP, PPCNP-BC, CPNP-AC, CNE, CHSE; Nancy Sullivan,DNP, RN; CrystelL.Farina, MSN, RN, CNE, CHSE
Abstract:

Failure to rescue, either lack of recognition or the lack of appropriate interventions necessary to prevent adverse events, is a costly form of medical error. Bedside nurses - those healthcare professionals who spend the most time with patients - have the greatest responsibility to identify when interventions are needed. With the increases in both the number of retiring nurses and new graduate nurses at the bedside, educating these inexperienced nurses requires specialized training through nurse residency programs (American Nurses Association, 2013). Key areas for development include recognition of changes in patient status, taking initiative, tracking multiple responsibilities, ability to prioritize and anticipate risk, and delegation of tasks (Berkow, Virksitis, Stewart & Conway, 2009).


For hospital educators limited in time and resources, this places additional pressures to ensure safe novice nurses. Simulation scenarios can play an integral role in training these newly licensed nurses. Through integration of the concepts of surveillance and taking action, simulation scenarios can be designed to address failure to rescue (Clark & Aiken, 2003). While many academic simulationists are familiar with designing simulations that align courses, concepts, and outcomes, hospital simulationists map simulation differently, with a lens toward competencies and patient safety, not concepts. This presentation will provide a hands-on opportunity for nurse educators to design simulations aimed at the costly problem of failure to rescue through the design of a curriculum map to be used in nurse residency programs.

Keywords:
simulation; failure to rescue; transition to practice
Repository Posting Date:
21-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Aug-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
INACSL Conference 2017
Conference Host:
INACSL
Conference Location:
Washington DC
Description:
INACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleFailure to Rescue: How Simulation Can Help Transition to Practiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeroz, Sabrinaen
dc.contributor.authorSchneidereith, Tonyaen
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorFarina, Crystel L.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsSabrina Beroz, DNP, RN, CHSE; Tonya Schneidereith PhD, CRNP, PPCNP-BC, CPNP-AC, CNE, CHSE; Nancy Sullivan,DNP, RN; CrystelL.Farina, MSN, RN, CNE, CHSEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622545-
dc.description.abstract<p>Failure to rescue, either lack of recognition or the lack of appropriate interventions necessary to prevent adverse events, is a costly form of medical error. Bedside nurses - those healthcare professionals who spend the most time with patients - have the greatest responsibility to identify when interventions are needed. With the increases in both the number of retiring nurses and new graduate nurses at the bedside, educating these inexperienced nurses requires specialized training through nurse residency programs (American Nurses Association, 2013). Key areas for development include recognition of changes in patient status, taking initiative, tracking multiple responsibilities, ability to prioritize and anticipate risk, and delegation of tasks (Berkow, Virksitis, Stewart &amp; Conway, 2009).</p> <p><br />For hospital educators limited in time and resources, this places additional pressures to ensure safe novice nurses. Simulation scenarios can play an integral role in training these newly licensed nurses. Through integration of the concepts of surveillance and taking action, simulation scenarios can be designed to address failure to rescue (Clark &amp; Aiken, 2003). While many academic simulationists are familiar with designing simulations that align courses, concepts, and outcomes, hospital simulationists map simulation differently, with a lens toward competencies and patient safety, not concepts. This presentation will provide a hands-on opportunity for nurse educators to design simulations aimed at the costly problem of failure to rescue through the design of a curriculum map to be used in nurse residency programs.</p>en
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectfailure to rescueen
dc.subjecttransition to practiceen
dc.date.available2017-08-21T13:50:43Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-21T13:50:43Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameINACSL Conference 2017en
dc.conference.hostINACSLen
dc.conference.locationWashington DCen
dc.descriptionINACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DCen
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