Caring Communication with Failing Students: A New Simulation Application for Graduate Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622547
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Caring Communication with Failing Students: A New Simulation Application for Graduate Education
Author(s):
Aschenbrenner, Diane S.; Moran, Roxanne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Diane S. Aschenbrenner, MS, RN, CHSE; Roxanne Moran, PhD, RN, CNE
Abstract:

Purpose: The National League for Nursing in 2014 noted the lack of qualified faculty obstructs the preparation of new nurses (Nurse Educator Shortage Fact Sheet). One necessary role of faculty is addressing student failure in caring ways (Sitzman & Watson, 2014). The literature on using simulation to help prepare future nurse educators is scarce. Practicing difficult conversations within the context of simulation is one method to enhance role development. This presentation will explore the infusion of caring science approaches within a graduate nursing education simulation of student failure.
Methods: Two simulations, one clinical failure and one didactic failure, were created based on INACSL standards (Lioce et.al., 2015) incorporating a standardized “student” actor. In preparation, graduate students read and discussed articles on grade disputes, student rights, incivility/violence, and faculty vulnerability. They also reviewed a video about caring science. Pre-simulation, students reflected about their personal experiences receiving or providing feedback. Post-simulation, students again reflected on providing feedback and its application to future practice.
Findings: Analysis of student reflections identified several themes: demonstration of caring behaviors; creating appropriate environment; educator accountability; and internal feelings. Anecdotal comments supported the importance of this learning experience. Additional data will be collected from course evaluation comments.
Implications: Role development of future nurse educators can be assisted with the use of strategically designed simulations. It is hoped that, as new faculty, graduates will shape their interactions with failing students using caring science approaches.

Keywords:
simulation; graduate; caring; communication; failing students
Repository Posting Date:
21-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Aug-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
INACSL Conference 2017
Conference Host:
INACSL
Conference Location:
Washington DC
Description:
INACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleCaring Communication with Failing Students: A New Simulation Application for Graduate Educationen_US
dc.contributor.authorAschenbrenner, Diane S.en
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Roxanneen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDiane S. Aschenbrenner, MS, RN, CHSE; Roxanne Moran, PhD, RN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622547-
dc.description.abstract<p>Purpose: The National League for Nursing in 2014 noted the lack of qualified faculty obstructs the preparation of new nurses (Nurse Educator Shortage Fact Sheet). One necessary role of faculty is addressing student failure in caring ways (Sitzman &amp; Watson, 2014). The literature on using simulation to help prepare future nurse educators is scarce. Practicing difficult conversations within the context of simulation is one method to enhance role development. This presentation will explore the infusion of caring science approaches within a graduate nursing education simulation of student failure. <br />Methods: Two simulations, one clinical failure and one didactic failure, were created based on INACSL standards (Lioce et.al., 2015) incorporating a standardized &ldquo;student&rdquo; actor. In preparation, graduate students read and discussed articles on grade disputes, student rights, incivility/violence, and faculty vulnerability. They also reviewed a video about caring science. Pre-simulation, students reflected about their personal experiences receiving or providing feedback. Post-simulation, students again reflected on providing feedback and its application to future practice.<br />Findings: Analysis of student reflections identified several themes: demonstration of caring behaviors; creating appropriate environment; educator accountability; and internal feelings. Anecdotal comments supported the importance of this learning experience. Additional data will be collected from course evaluation comments.<br />Implications: Role development of future nurse educators can be assisted with the use of strategically designed simulations. It is hoped that, as new faculty, graduates will shape their interactions with failing students using caring science approaches.</p>en
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectgraduateen
dc.subjectcaringen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectfailing studentsen
dc.date.available2017-08-21T13:51:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-21T13:51:02Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameINACSL Conference 2017en
dc.conference.hostINACSLen
dc.conference.locationWashington DCen
dc.descriptionINACSL Conference 2017: Nursing Simulation, Marriott Wardman Hotel, Washington DCen
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