The Effect of Deliberate Practice and Peer Mentoring on Baccalaureate Nursing Students’ Competence in Vital Signs, Breath Sounds, and Heart Sounds

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622550
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Quasi-Experimental Study, Other
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
The Effect of Deliberate Practice and Peer Mentoring on Baccalaureate Nursing Students’ Competence in Vital Signs, Breath Sounds, and Heart Sounds
Author(s):
Ross, Jennifer Gunberg
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Nu
Author Details:
Jennifer Gunberg Ross, PhD, RN, CNE, e-mail: jennifer.ross@villanova.edu
Abstract:

Background:  Nursing students often do not have adequate opportunities to practice psychomotor skills within patient care settings, but skill decay can occur without regular practice. 

Methods:  A one-group, repeated-measures study (n=69) explored the effect of deliberate practice with peer mentoring on skill competence and retention in baccalaureate nursing students.  Skill competence in vital signs, and auscultation of breath and heart sounds was measured using a task-specific checklist before, immediately after, and four months after a deliberate practice program with peer mentoring.

Results:  Skill competence in vital signs significantly increased after deliberate practice.  Skill competence in vital signs, and auscultation of breath and heart sounds did not significantly change four months after deliberate practice indicating skill retention.

Conclusions:  This study suggests that the use of deliberate practice with peer mentoring may be an effective teaching strategy to enhance skill competence and retention; however more research is needed to support these findings.

Keywords:
education, baccalaureate nursing; education - nursing; education research; education strategies
CINAHL Headings:
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Professional Competence; Students, Nursing; Peer Group; Mentorship; Mentorship--Methods; Education, Nursing; Education, Nursing--Methods; Learning Methods
Repository Posting Date:
25-Aug-2017
Date of Publication:
25-Aug-2017
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
Attached document is a pre-print manuscript prepared for submission to a traditional journal.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelQuasi-Experimental Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleThe Effect of Deliberate Practice and Peer Mentoring on Baccalaureate Nursing Students’ Competence in Vital Signs, Breath Sounds, and Heart Soundsen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Jennifer Gunbergen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Nuen
dc.author.detailsJennifer Gunberg Ross, PhD, RN, CNE, e-mail: jennifer.ross@villanova.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622550-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background:</strong>  Nursing students often do not have adequate opportunities to practice psychomotor skills within patient care settings, but skill decay can occur without regular practice. </p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong>  A one-group, repeated-measures study (n=69) explored the effect of deliberate practice with peer mentoring on skill competence and retention in baccalaureate nursing students.  Skill competence in vital signs, and auscultation of breath and heart sounds was measured using a task-specific checklist before, immediately after, and four months after a deliberate practice program with peer mentoring.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong>  Skill competence in vital signs significantly increased after deliberate practice.  Skill competence in vital signs, and auscultation of breath and heart sounds did not significantly change four months after deliberate practice indicating skill retention.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions:</strong>  This study suggests that the use of deliberate practice with peer mentoring may be an effective teaching strategy to enhance skill competence and retention; however more research is needed to support these findings.</p>en
dc.subjecteducation, baccalaureate nursingen
dc.subjecteducation - nursingen
dc.subjecteducation researchen
dc.subjecteducation strategiesen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Nursing, Baccalaureateen
dc.subject.cinahlProfessional Competenceen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlPeer Groupen
dc.subject.cinahlMentorshipen
dc.subject.cinahlMentorship--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Nursing--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlLearning Methodsen
dc.date.available2017-08-25T20:07:23Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T20:07:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.descriptionAttached document is a pre-print manuscript prepared for submission to a traditional journal.en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.-
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