Pause with Paws: Implementation of an Evidence-Based Animal Visitation Program at a Small Vermont University

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622572
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Pause with Paws: Implementation of an Evidence-Based Animal Visitation Program at a Small Vermont University
Author(s):
Smith, Angela
Additional Author Information:
Angela Smith, BSN, RN - DNP Candidate at Capella University
Advisors:
Suttle, Catherine; Matheson, Linda; Carey, Kimberly; Havener, Jeanne-Marie E.
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

This evidence-based practice change pilot project explored college student perceptions of the efficacy of an animal visitation program (AVP) toward reducing perceived stress. Using a quantitative, longitudinal pre- and post-intervention design, a convenience sample of students from a Vermont college were recruited to attend seven-weekly, 90-minute AVP meetings where they interacted with dogs in a casual environment, while practicing mindfulness techniques. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Survey (PSS-10) pre-, intra-, and post-intervention to measure student perceived stress; and the Center for the Study of Animal Wellness Pet Bonding Scale – adapted (CSAWPBS) intra-and post-intervention to measure perceived attachment to the dogs. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference between measures on the PSS-10 (P = 0.02) indicating that student perceived stress decreased significantly over time. The CSAWPBS increased slightly; yet showed no significant difference between intra-and post-measures, thus, suggesting that while interactions with the dogs did increase positive emotions over time, students experienced limited attachment to the dogs. These findings suggest that an AVP program may be an effective intervention to reduce perceived stress in college students.

Keywords:
animal assisted interactions; college students
CINAHL Headings:
Pet Therapy; Dogs; Students, College; Stress Management; Stress Management--Methods; Stress, Psychological; Stress, Psychological--Prevention and Control; Student Health Services; Students, College--Psychosocial Factors
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-09-12T16:33:54Z
Date of Publication:
2017-09-12

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSuttle, Catherineen
dc.contributor.advisorMatheson, Lindaen
dc.contributor.advisorCarey, Kimberlyen
dc.contributor.advisorHavener, Jeanne-Marie E.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Angelaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-12T16:33:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-12T16:33:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622572-
dc.description.abstract<p>This evidence-based practice change pilot project explored college student perceptions of the efficacy of an animal visitation program (AVP) toward reducing perceived stress. Using a quantitative, longitudinal pre- and post-intervention design, a convenience sample of students from a Vermont college were recruited to attend seven-weekly, 90-minute AVP meetings where they interacted with dogs in a casual environment, while practicing mindfulness techniques. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Survey (PSS-10) pre-, intra-, and post-intervention to measure student perceived stress; and the Center for the Study of Animal Wellness Pet Bonding Scale – adapted (CSAWPBS) intra-and post-intervention to measure perceived attachment to the dogs. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference between measures on the PSS-10 (P = 0.02) indicating that student perceived stress decreased significantly over time. The CSAWPBS increased slightly; yet showed no significant difference between intra-and post-measures, thus, suggesting that while interactions with the dogs did increase positive emotions over time, students experienced limited attachment to the dogs. These findings suggest that an AVP program may be an effective intervention to reduce perceived stress in college students.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectanimal assisted interactionsen
dc.subjectcollege studentsen
dc.titlePause with Paws: Implementation of an Evidence-Based Animal Visitation Program at a Small Vermont Universityen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsAngela Smith, BSN, RN - DNP Candidate at Capella Universityen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.subject.cinahlPet Therapyen
dc.subject.cinahlDogsen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Collegeen
dc.subject.cinahlStress Managementen
dc.subject.cinahlStress Management--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlStress, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.cinahlStress, Psychological--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlStudent Health Servicesen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, College--Psychosocial Factorsen
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