Nurse Educators’ Self-Efficacy In Addressing Demonstrated Unprofessional Student Behavior: A Phenomenological Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622639
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Phenomenology
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Nurse Educators’ Self-Efficacy In Addressing Demonstrated Unprofessional Student Behavior: A Phenomenological Study
Author(s):
Bogdan, Bette Ann Davis
Additional Author Information:
Bette Bogdan, PhD
Advisors:
Mahaffey, Elizabeth; Daly, Amy; Lundstrom, Alicia; Roberts, Jalynn
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
William Carey University
Abstract:
Nurse educators must address demonstrated unprofessional student behaviors to graduate a self-aware novice nurse capable of effective professional communication. The study utilized a phenomenological qualitative research design with a purposive sampling of Practical Nursing, Associate Degree, Diploma, Bachelors of Science, Masters of Science, and Doctoral nurse faculty and sought answers to the following three research questions: (a) Do nurse educators possess the self-efficacy to address demonstrated unprofessional student behavior? (b) Do nurses educators choose to ignore demonstrated unprofessional behaviors due to lack of self-efficacy with the process of student intervention? (c) What tools are necessary to address demonstrated unprofessional student behaviors effectively when it occurs? Descriptive data analysis was conducted to identify recurrent themes. Data saturation was realized after eight faculty were interviewed, and five themes emerged. The themes identified that to increase educators’ self-efficay when confronted with demonstarted unprofessional student behaviors, faculty want training, role models, administrative support, and a tool-kit to refer to when confronted with incivility. The participants in this study provided valuable insight into the lived experiences of nurse faculty when addressing demonstrated unprofessional behaviors in the academic environment. Additional research is recommended to identify the specific educational curriculum components for nursing students seeking an advanced degree to teach other nursing students, as well as onboarding and annual new nurse faculty training.
Keywords:
nurse educators; nursing student behavior
CINAHL Headings:
Self-Efficacy; Faculty, Nursing; Professionalism; Students, Nursing; Behavior
Description:
The author retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-09-19T14:53:17Z
Date of Publication:
2017-09-19

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMahaffey, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.advisorDaly, Amyen
dc.contributor.advisorLundstrom, Aliciaen
dc.contributor.advisorRoberts, Jalynnen
dc.contributor.authorBogdan, Bette Ann Davisen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-19T14:53:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-19T14:53:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-19-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622639-
dc.descriptionThe author retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstractNurse educators must address demonstrated unprofessional student behaviors to graduate a self-aware novice nurse capable of effective professional communication. The study utilized a phenomenological qualitative research design with a purposive sampling of Practical Nursing, Associate Degree, Diploma, Bachelors of Science, Masters of Science, and Doctoral nurse faculty and sought answers to the following three research questions: (a) Do nurse educators possess the self-efficacy to address demonstrated unprofessional student behavior? (b) Do nurses educators choose to ignore demonstrated unprofessional behaviors due to lack of self-efficacy with the process of student intervention? (c) What tools are necessary to address demonstrated unprofessional student behaviors effectively when it occurs? Descriptive data analysis was conducted to identify recurrent themes. Data saturation was realized after eight faculty were interviewed, and five themes emerged. The themes identified that to increase educators’ self-efficay when confronted with demonstarted unprofessional student behaviors, faculty want training, role models, administrative support, and a tool-kit to refer to when confronted with incivility. The participants in this study provided valuable insight into the lived experiences of nurse faculty when addressing demonstrated unprofessional behaviors in the academic environment. Additional research is recommended to identify the specific educational curriculum components for nursing students seeking an advanced degree to teach other nursing students, as well as onboarding and annual new nurse faculty training.en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectnurse educatorsen
dc.subjectnursing student behavioren
dc.titleNurse Educators’ Self-Efficacy In Addressing Demonstrated Unprofessional Student Behavior: A Phenomenological Studyen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorWilliam Carey Universityen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsBette Bogdan, PhDen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Phenomenologyen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlSelf-Efficacyen
dc.subject.cinahlFaculty, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlProfessionalismen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlBehavioren
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