Effect of Genetic Education on Sickle Cell Disorder screening Uptake among Secondary School Students in Ilesa- East Local Government Area, Osun State, Nigeria

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622644
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Quasi-Experimental Study, Other
Research Approach:
Other
Title:
Effect of Genetic Education on Sickle Cell Disorder screening Uptake among Secondary School Students in Ilesa- East Local Government Area, Osun State, Nigeria
Author(s):
Olagunju Oluwayemisi, Elizabeth; Fajemilehin, Benjamin Reuben
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Lambda-at-Large
Author Details:
Olagunju Oluwayemisi RN, Msc.N, FWACN e-mail:oolagunju13@gmail.com Tau Lambda -at-large Chapter;Fajemilehin B.R RN, PhD e-mail:fajemilehin@yahoo.com
Abstract:

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is becoming an epidemic in Nigeria. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of genetic education with counselling on uptake of genotype screening among secondary school students (SSS).

This was a quasi experimental design of one- group pretest - posttest design. 389 SSS in grade10, 11 and 12 were randomly selected and recruited from six schools into the study. The consent of the parents and assents of SSS were taken. Data was collected with the aid of a 20 items structured self administered questionnaire, at pre and post intervention stage. Maximum score for Knowledge was 24 while that of attitude was 14. The intervention was five training sessions on genetic education, free screening, and counselling for screening volunteers. Analysis of data was done using SPSS version 17. Data was presented using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Out of the 389 students recruited only 283 questionnaires were fit for analysis. 193 (68.2%) were females; mean age was 15.5+1.23year. Most (145,51.2%) were in grade 11; and living with their parents (88.3%). There was significant improvement in the knowledge of the students post intervention (p=0.003) and mean score at posttest increased for both Knowledge (19.7) and attitude (11.7). 87.3% did genotype screening and were counseled adequately.

Findings support positive influence of genetic education on cognitive capacity of students and attitudes to screening uptake. All SSS should be allowed to offer biology and curriculum review should support inclusion of genetic education. Entrance requirements to college should include genetic testing.

Keywords:
Genetic education
CINAHL Headings:
Anemia, Sickle Cell; Anemia, Sickle Cell--Nigeria; Genetics; Genetics--Education; Genetic Screening; School Health Services; School Health Education; Nigeria
Repository Posting Date:
19-Sep-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Sep-2017
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International; Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Eta Chapter
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelQuasi-Experimental Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachOtheren
dc.titleEffect of Genetic Education on Sickle Cell Disorder screening Uptake among Secondary School Students in Ilesa- East Local Government Area, Osun State, Nigeriaen
dc.contributor.authorOlagunju Oluwayemisi, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorFajemilehin, Benjamin Reubenen
dc.contributor.departmentTau Lambda-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsOlagunju Oluwayemisi RN, Msc.N, FWACN e-mail:oolagunju13@gmail.com Tau Lambda -at-large Chapter;Fajemilehin B.R RN, PhD e-mail:fajemilehin@yahoo.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622644-
dc.description.abstract<p>Sickle cell disease (SCD) is becoming an epidemic in Nigeria. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of genetic education with counselling on uptake of genotype screening among secondary school students (SSS). <strong></strong></p> <p>This was a quasi experimental design of one- group pretest - posttest design. 389 SSS in grade10, 11 and 12 were randomly selected and recruited from six schools into the study. The consent of the parents and assents of SSS were taken. Data was collected with the aid of a 20 items structured self administered questionnaire, at pre and post intervention stage. Maximum score for Knowledge was 24 while that of attitude was 14. The intervention was five training sessions on genetic education, free screening, and counselling for screening volunteers. Analysis of data was done using SPSS version 17. Data was presented using descriptive and inferential statistics. <strong></strong></p> <p>Out of the 389 students recruited only 283 questionnaires were fit for analysis. 193 (68.2%) were females; mean age was 15.5<span style="text-decoration: underline;">+</span>1.23year. Most (145,51.2%) were in grade 11; and living with their parents (88.3%). There was significant improvement in the knowledge of the students post intervention (p=0.003) and mean score at posttest increased for both Knowledge (19.7) and attitude (11.7). 87.3% did genotype screening and were counseled adequately.</p> <p>Findings support positive influence of genetic education on cognitive capacity of students and attitudes to screening uptake. All SSS should be allowed to offer biology and curriculum review should support inclusion of genetic education. Entrance requirements to college should include genetic testing.</p>en
dc.subjectGenetic educationen
dc.subject.cinahlAnemia, Sickle Cellen
dc.subject.cinahlAnemia, Sickle Cell--Nigeriaen
dc.subject.cinahlGeneticsen
dc.subject.cinahlGenetics--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlGenetic Screeningen
dc.subject.cinahlSchool Health Servicesen
dc.subject.cinahlSchool Health Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlNigeriaen
dc.date.available2017-09-19T15:27:13Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-19T15:27:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Eta Chapteren
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
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