The Effectiveness of Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement in Preventing Inpatient Newborn Falls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622664
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
The Effectiveness of Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement in Preventing Inpatient Newborn Falls
Author(s):
Dahl, Carrie L.
Additional Author Information:
Newborn falls can occur in the immediate postpartum period. The purpose of this capstone project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool in impacting inpatient newborn falls in the postpartum setting. The literature indicated health care settings that used a safety contract in their newborn fall prevention programs had success in decreasing or eliminating in-hospital newborn falls. A mixed methods design, Evidence-based Practice (EBP), Quantitative Descriptive and Qualitative Case Study designs were utilized to address three outcomes. The primary target population was postpartum newborn fall case events and postpartum nursing staff documentation on the use of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool at a Mid-Western Women’s Hospital. A convenience sample of all newborn fall events and charts for retrospective review were utilized. Data revealed no newborn falls occurred during the 3 months after implementation of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool. However, an examination of the newborn fall case events suggested the risk factors were mothers who breastfeed, or breast and bottle feed and delivery by cesarean section. Additionally, newborn falls were most likely to occur during the early morning hours between 1-7am, after 24 hours from delivery time, and within 6 hours of receiving sedating medication. Other data revealed, that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool was somewhat being used as intended. This study reinforced that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool can aide in communication between parents of newborns and postpartum nursing staff to prevent falls and improve the safety of newborns in the inpatient setting.
Advisors:
Ward, Susie
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Nebraska Methodist College
Abstract:

Newborn falls can occur in the immediate postpartum period. The purpose of this capstone project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool in impacting inpatient newborn falls in the postpartum setting. The literature indicated health care settings that used a safety contract in their newborn fall prevention programs had success in decreasing or eliminating in-hospital newborn falls. A mixed methods design, Evidence-based Practice (EBP), Quantitative Descriptive and Qualitative Case Study designs were utilized to address three outcomes. The primary target population was postpartum newborn fall case events and postpartum nursing staff documentation on the use of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool at a Mid-Western Women’s Hospital. A convenience sample of all newborn fall events and charts for retrospective review were utilized. Data revealed no newborn falls occurred during the 3 months after implementation of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool. However, an examination of the newborn fall case events suggested the risk factors were mothers who breastfeed, or breast and bottle feed and delivery by cesarean section. Additionally, newborn falls were most likely to occur during the early morning hours between 1-7am, after 24 hours from delivery time, and within 6 hours of receiving sedating medication. Other data revealed, that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool was somewhat being used as intended. This study reinforced that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool can aide in communication between parents of newborns and postpartum nursing staff to prevent falls and improve the safety of newborns in the inpatient setting.

Keywords:
Newborn Falls; Prevention
CINAHL Headings:
Patient Safety--In Infancy and Childhood; Patient Safety; Accidental Falls--Prevention and Control--In Infancy and Childhood; Accidental Falls--Prevention and Control; Accidental Falls; Infant, Newborn; Postnatal Care; Hospital Programs; Patient Education
Repository Posting Date:
2017-09-19T21:00:32Z
Date of Publication:
2017-09-19

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWard, Susieen
dc.contributor.authorDahl, Carrie L.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-19T21:00:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-19T21:00:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-19-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622664-
dc.description.abstract<p>Newborn falls can occur in the immediate postpartum period. The purpose of this capstone project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool in impacting inpatient newborn falls in the postpartum setting. The literature indicated health care settings that used a safety contract in their newborn fall prevention programs had success in decreasing or eliminating in-hospital newborn falls. A mixed methods design, Evidence-based Practice (EBP), Quantitative Descriptive and Qualitative Case Study designs were utilized to address three outcomes. The primary target population was postpartum newborn fall case events and postpartum nursing staff documentation on the use of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool at a Mid-Western Women’s Hospital. A convenience sample of all newborn fall events and charts for retrospective review were utilized. Data revealed no newborn falls occurred during the 3 months after implementation of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool. However, an examination of the newborn fall case events suggested the risk factors were mothers who breastfeed, or breast and bottle feed and delivery by cesarean section. Additionally, newborn falls were most likely to occur during the early morning hours between 1-7am, after 24 hours from delivery time, and within 6 hours of receiving sedating medication. Other data revealed, that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool was somewhat being used as intended. This study reinforced that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool can aide in communication between parents of newborns and postpartum nursing staff to prevent falls and improve the safety of newborns in the inpatient setting.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectNewborn Fallsen
dc.subjectPreventionen
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement in Preventing Inpatient Newborn Falls-
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorNebraska Methodist Collegeen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.primary-author.detailsNewborn falls can occur in the immediate postpartum period. The purpose of this capstone project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool in impacting inpatient newborn falls in the postpartum setting. The literature indicated health care settings that used a safety contract in their newborn fall prevention programs had success in decreasing or eliminating in-hospital newborn falls. A mixed methods design, Evidence-based Practice (EBP), Quantitative Descriptive and Qualitative Case Study designs were utilized to address three outcomes. The primary target population was postpartum newborn fall case events and postpartum nursing staff documentation on the use of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool at a Mid-Western Women’s Hospital. A convenience sample of all newborn fall events and charts for retrospective review were utilized. Data revealed no newborn falls occurred during the 3 months after implementation of the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool. However, an examination of the newborn fall case events suggested the risk factors were mothers who breastfeed, or breast and bottle feed and delivery by cesarean section. Additionally, newborn falls were most likely to occur during the early morning hours between 1-7am, after 24 hours from delivery time, and within 6 hours of receiving sedating medication. Other data revealed, that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool was somewhat being used as intended. This study reinforced that the Newborn Safety Information and Acknowledgement tool can aide in communication between parents of newborns and postpartum nursing staff to prevent falls and improve the safety of newborns in the inpatient setting.en
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Safety--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Safetyen
dc.subject.cinahlAccidental Falls--Prevention and Control--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlAccidental Falls--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlAccidental Fallsen
dc.subject.cinahlInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.cinahlPostnatal Careen
dc.subject.cinahlHospital Programsen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Educationen
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