The Manager’s Perspective: Perceptions of and Behaviors Toward Patient and Visitor Aggression in Hospitals (PERoPA). An international online survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622701
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
The Manager’s Perspective: Perceptions of and Behaviors Toward Patient and Visitor Aggression in Hospitals (PERoPA). An international online survey
Author(s):
Heckemann, Birgit
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Omega
Author Details:
Birgit Heckemann, RN, BSc, MSc, e-mail: birgit.heckemann@bfh.ch
Abstract:

Background: Patient and visitor aggression has a damaging influence on workflows as well as patient and staff safety in all areas of healthcare. Nurse managers are in a key position to address patient and visitor aggression. Despite their important role, little is known about nurse managers' perception of patient aggression and nursing team efficacy in dealing with aggressive behaviours.

 

Aims: To explore (1) whether managers' perception of patient and visitor aggression differs between countries, management levels and care settings (general hospital/mental health) and (2) perceived team-efficacy in association with social structural variables (e.g. communication), leadership characteristics, and organizational support factors (e.g. administration attitude, care environment).

 

Methods: A cross-sectional, international open online survey amongst nurse managers in German-speaking countries (Switzerland, Germany, Austria). The survey tool comprised 86 items relating to 13 domains. Data were collected between November 2016 and February 2017 and analysed descriptively (frequencies, cross tabulation) and in logistic regression.

 

Findings: 646 managers started the survey, 446 completed it. Overall, few differences between countries and management levels in the perception of patient and visitor aggression and team efficacy were observed. However, significantly more managers working in the mental health setting perceived patient and visitor aggression to be a potentially positive force.

Four factors associated with perceived team efficacy were identified. These included a supportive organisational attitude, communication and reporting of incidents, adequate care environment (e.g. sufficient lighting etc.) and working in mental health.


Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of a positive organizational attitude towards reducing patient aggression. Nurse managers link clinical practice and organizational management and are thus in a key position to promote safer work environments by strengthening communication channels and influencing organisational attitudes. Furthermore, an exchange between nurse managers in mental health and general hospital nursing might contribute to improving team efficacy in general hospitals.

Keywords:
nurse manager; aggression; survey research
CINAHL Headings:
Nurse Managers; Nurse Attitudes; Aggression; Hospitals; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Patient Assault; Problem Patients; Patient Assault -- Epidemiology; Professional-Patient Relations; Surveys
Repository Posting Date:
21-Sep-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Sep-2017
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
The author is a grant recipient of STTI and Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland. The author will be pursuing traditional journal publication using the information from this report.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleThe Manager’s Perspective: Perceptions of and Behaviors Toward Patient and Visitor Aggression in Hospitals (PERoPA). An international online surveyen
dc.contributor.authorHeckemann, Birgiten
dc.contributor.departmentTau Omegaen
dc.author.detailsBirgit Heckemann, RN, BSc, MSc, e-mail: birgit.heckemann@bfh.chen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622701-
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Patient and visitor aggression has a damaging influence on workflows as well as patient and staff safety in all areas of healthcare. Nurse managers are in a key position to address patient and visitor aggression. Despite their important role, little is known about nurse managers' perception of patient aggression and nursing team efficacy in dealing with aggressive behaviours.</p> <p> </p> <p>Aims: To explore (1) whether managers' perception of patient and visitor aggression differs between countries, management levels and care settings (general hospital/mental health) and (2) perceived team-efficacy in association with social structural variables (e.g. communication), leadership characteristics, and organizational support factors (e.g. administration attitude, care environment).</p> <p> </p> <p>Methods: A cross-sectional, international open online survey amongst nurse managers in German-speaking countries (Switzerland, Germany, Austria). The survey tool comprised 86 items relating to 13 domains. Data were collected between November 2016 and February 2017 and analysed descriptively (frequencies, cross tabulation) and in logistic regression.</p> <p> </p> <p>Findings: 646 managers started the survey, 446 completed it. Overall, few differences between countries and management levels in the perception of patient and visitor aggression and team efficacy were observed. However, significantly more managers working in the mental health setting perceived patient and visitor aggression to be a potentially positive force.</p> <p>Four factors associated with perceived team efficacy were identified. These included a supportive organisational attitude, communication and reporting of incidents, adequate care environment (e.g. sufficient lighting etc.) and working in mental health.</p> <p><br /> Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of a positive organizational attitude towards reducing patient aggression. Nurse managers link clinical practice and organizational management and are thus in a key position to promote safer work environments by strengthening communication channels and influencing organisational attitudes. Furthermore, an exchange between nurse managers in mental health and general hospital nursing might contribute to improving team efficacy in general hospitals.</p>en
dc.subjectnurse manageren
dc.subjectaggressionen
dc.subjectsurvey researchen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Managersen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlAggressionen
dc.subject.cinahlHospitalsen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Staff, Hospitalen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Assaulten
dc.subject.cinahlProblem Patientsen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Assault -- Epidemiologyen
dc.subject.cinahlProfessional-Patient Relationsen
dc.subject.cinahlSurveysen
dc.date.available2017-09-21T14:56:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-21T14:56:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.descriptionThe author is a grant recipient of STTI and Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland. The author will be pursuing traditional journal publication using the information from this report.en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.-
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