Evidence-Based Pilot for Improved Antibiotic Prescribing

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622718
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Observational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
Evidence-Based Pilot for Improved Antibiotic Prescribing
Author(s):
Nguyen, BaoTram Nina
Additional Author Information:
BaoTram Nina Nguyen, DNP, MSN, FNP-C
Advisors:
Rass, Juanita
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Chamberlain University
Abstract:

The nature and burden of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for self-limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care settings, continues to pose great threats to public health. This high prevalence leads to an increase of antimicrobial resistant infections, which calls for more Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) educational strategies.  The practice’s problem was identified as high rates of antibiotic prescribing for acute RTIs, without specific indications for antibiotic treatment.  This project was implemented with multi-faceted approaches by identifying strategies to improve provider-patient communication; increasing providers’ knowledge and awareness of current treatment guidelines, and disseminating educational information to patients about the importance of appropriate antibiotic treatment.  These educational strategies are the core principles in addressing quality care concerns within this practice, which aimed to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions in eight weeks. 

This study used a descriptive observational method where the pre- and post-interventional design was used to measure the effectiveness of EBP educational information through the delayed antibiotic prescribing strategy.  The findings supported the prominence of delayed antibiotic strategy for self-limiting RTIs recommended by the EBP Clinical Guidelines No. 69, entitled “Respiratory Tract Infections – Antibiotic Prescribing” developed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). 

These findings suggested that there was a change in knowledge and awareness in prescribing practices through the combined-educational interventions for providers and patients in delaying the antibiotic treatment.  This change in knowledge and awareness of antibiotic indications demonstrated that education affects providers’ awareness about their prescribing practices, as evident by antibiotic prescribing rates dropped immediately post-intervention stage.

Keywords:
Prescriptions, Drug; Antibiotics therapeutic use; prescription drug abuse; Respiratory Tract Infections psychology; Patient Education; Patient Education methods; Antibiotics therapeutic use; Antibiotic Prophylaxis utilization
CINAHL Headings:
Antibiotics; Antibiotics--Administration and Dosage; Inappropriate Prescribing; Respiratory Tract Infections; Respiratory Tract Infections--Drug Therapy; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based
Description:
This paper is submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-09-21T20:16:03Z
Date of Publication:
2017-09-21

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorRass, Juanitaen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, BaoTram Ninaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-21T20:16:03Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-21T20:16:03Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-21-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622718-
dc.descriptionThis paper is submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree.en
dc.description.abstract<p>The nature and burden of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for self-limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care settings, continues to pose great threats to public health. This high prevalence leads to an increase of antimicrobial resistant infections, which calls for more Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) educational strategies.  The practice’s problem was identified as high rates of antibiotic prescribing for acute RTIs, without specific indications for antibiotic treatment.  This project was implemented with multi-faceted approaches by identifying strategies to improve provider-patient communication; increasing providers’ knowledge and awareness of current treatment guidelines, and disseminating educational information to patients about the importance of appropriate antibiotic treatment.  These educational strategies are the core principles in addressing quality care concerns within this practice, which aimed to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions in eight weeks. </p> <p>This study used a descriptive observational method where the pre- and post-interventional design was used to measure the effectiveness of EBP educational information through the delayed antibiotic prescribing strategy.  The findings supported the prominence of delayed antibiotic strategy for self-limiting RTIs recommended by the EBP Clinical Guidelines No. 69, entitled “Respiratory Tract Infections – Antibiotic Prescribing” developed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). </p> <p>These findings suggested that there was a change in knowledge and awareness in prescribing practices through the combined-educational interventions for providers and patients in delaying the antibiotic treatment.  This change in knowledge and awareness of antibiotic indications demonstrated that education affects providers’ awareness about their prescribing practices, as evident by antibiotic prescribing rates dropped immediately post-intervention stage.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectPrescriptions, Drugen
dc.subjectAntibiotics therapeutic useen
dc.subjectprescription drug abuseen
dc.subjectRespiratory Tract Infections psychologyen
dc.subjectPatient Educationen
dc.subjectPatient Education methodsen
dc.subjectAntibiotics therapeutic useen
dc.subjectAntibiotic Prophylaxis utilizationen
dc.titleEvidence-Based Pilot for Improved Antibiotic Prescribingen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorChamberlain Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.primary-author.detailsBaoTram Nina Nguyen, DNP, MSN, FNP-Cen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelObservational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)en
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.subject.cinahlAntibioticsen
dc.subject.cinahlAntibiotics--Administration and Dosageen
dc.subject.cinahlInappropriate Prescribingen
dc.subject.cinahlRespiratory Tract Infectionsen
dc.subject.cinahlRespiratory Tract Infections--Drug Therapyen
dc.subject.cinahlProfessional Practice, Evidence-Baseden
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