Ondansetron Administration Prior to Subarachnoid Block in Cesarean Section: An Evidence Based Practice Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622724
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Other Graduate Paper
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Ondansetron Administration Prior to Subarachnoid Block in Cesarean Section: An Evidence Based Practice Analysis
Author(s):
Bustamante, Jeremy
Additional Author Information:
Jeremy Bustamante, DNAP, CRNA
Advisors:
Hadenfeldt, Sharon
Degree:
Doctoral – Other
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Bryan College of Health Sciences
Abstract:

Subarachnoid block (SAB) is a preferred regional technique utilized by many institutions for caesarean section. A sensory block height of T5 is necessary for a successful caesarean under SAB. Unfortunately, side effects often emerge related to the physiological changes as a result of sympathetic nervous system inhibition. Current research suggests up to 55%-90% of parturients experience extended block height resulting in hypotension and bradycardia.There is a reduction in cardiac output due to a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and venous pooling. Similarly, the shift of cardiac autonomic balance toward parasympathetic stimulation causes bradycardia and activation of left ventricular mechanoreceptors due to a decreased ventricular volume. The mechanism is known as the Bezold-Jarisch reflex (BJR).

Keywords:
Bezold-Jarisch reflex; bradycardia; Cesarean Section; hypotension; ondansetron; subarachnoid block
CINAHL Headings:
Cesarean Section; Ondansetron--Administration and Dosage; Hypotension--Etiology; Anesthesia, Spinal--Adverse Effects--In Pregnancy; Reflex; Ondansetron; Hypotension; Anesthesia, Spinal--Adverse Effects; Anesthesia, Spinal
Repository Posting Date:
2017-09-22T14:19:33Z
Date of Publication:
2017-09-22

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHadenfeldt, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorBustamante, Jeremyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T14:19:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-22T14:19:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-22-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622724-
dc.description.abstract<p>Subarachnoid block (SAB) is a preferred regional technique utilized by many institutions for caesarean section. A sensory block height of T5 is necessary for a successful caesarean under SAB. Unfortunately, side effects often emerge related to the physiological changes as a result of sympathetic nervous system inhibition. Current research suggests up to 55%-90% of parturients experience extended block height resulting in hypotension and bradycardia.There is a reduction in cardiac output due to a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and venous pooling. Similarly, the shift of cardiac autonomic balance toward parasympathetic stimulation causes bradycardia and activation of left ventricular mechanoreceptors due to a decreased ventricular volume. The mechanism is known as the Bezold-Jarisch reflex (BJR).</span></p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectBezold-Jarisch reflexen
dc.subjectbradycardiaen
dc.subjectCesarean Sectionen
dc.subjecthypotensionen
dc.subjectondansetronen
dc.subjectsubarachnoid blocken
dc.titleOndansetron Administration Prior to Subarachnoid Block in Cesarean Section: An Evidence Based Practice Analysisen_US
dc.typeOther Graduate Paperen
thesis.degree.grantorBryan College of Health Sciencesen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral – Otheren
dc.primary-author.detailsJeremy Bustamante, DNAP, CRNAen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.subject.cinahlCesarean Sectionen
dc.subject.cinahlOndansetron--Administration and Dosageen
dc.subject.cinahlHypotension--Etiologyen
dc.subject.cinahlAnesthesia, Spinal--Adverse Effects--In Pregnancyen
dc.subject.cinahlReflexen
dc.subject.cinahlOndansetronen
dc.subject.cinahlHypotensionen
dc.subject.cinahlAnesthesia, Spinal--Adverse Effectsen
dc.subject.cinahlAnesthesia, Spinalen
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